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Rosacea

Rosacea

Definition

Rosacea is a skin disease typically appearing in persons during their 30s and 40s. It is marked by redness (erythema) of the face, flushing of the skin, and the presence of hard pimples (papules) or pus-filled pimples (pustules) as well as small, visible spider-like veins called telangiectasia. In later stages of the disease, the face may swell and the nose may take on a bulbous appearance, a condition called rhinophyma.

Description

Rosacea produces redness and flushing of the skin, as well as pustules and papules. Areas of the face, including the nose, cheeks, forehead, and chin, are the primary sites, but some persons experience symptoms on their necks, backs, scalp, arms, and legs. It is a common disease that afflicts one out of every 20 Americans.

The similarity in appearance of rosacea to acne led people in the past to erroneously call the disease acne rosacea or adult acne. Like acne, the skin can have pimples

and papules. Unlike acne, however, persons with rosacea do not have blackheads.

Causes & symptoms

There is no known specific cause of rosacea. A history of redness and flushing precedes the disease in most patients. The consensus among many experts is that multiple factors may lead to an overreaction of the facial blood vessels, which triggers flushing. Over time, persistent episodes of redness and flushing leave the face continually inflamed. Pimples and blood-vessel changes follow.

Unidentified genetic factors may also come into play because 40% of rosacea sufferers have a family member who has rosacea. The disease is more common in women and in persons with light skin and fair hair. It may be more common in persons with a Celtic, English, Scandinavian, Swedish, Welsh, Polish, Lithuanian, or Balkan background.

Because certain antibiotics are useful in the treatment of rosacea, some researchers suspect a bacterium or other infectious agent may be the cause. One of the newest suspects is a bacterium called Helicobacter pylori, which has been implicated in causing stomach ulcers. The evidence supporting this suspicion is mixed.

Other investigators have observed that a particular parasite, the microscopic mite Demodex folliculorum, can be found on areas of the skin affected by rosacea. However, this mite can also be detected in the skin of persons who do not have the disease. It is likely that this mite does not cause rosacea, but merely aggravates it.

Rosacea may be caused by factors such as a deficiency of B-complex vitamins or hydrochloric acid (HCl) in the stomach. Some researchers suspect that yeast may cause rosacea.

In early stages of rosacea, patients typically experience repeated episodes of flushing. Later, areas of the face are persistently red and telangiectasia, as well as inflamed papules and pustules, appear on the nose and cheeks. Over time, the skin may take on a roughened, orange-peel texture. Very late in the disorder, a small group of patients with rosacea will develop rhinophyma, which can give the nose a reddened, bulbous appearance. The late actor W.C. Fields was affected with this condition. Men are three times more likely than women to develop rhinophyma.

Up to one-half of patients with rosacea may experience symptoms related to their eyes. Ocular rosacea, as it is called, frequently precedes the other manifestations on the skin. Telangiectasia may appear around the borders of the eyelid, the eyelids may be chronically inflamed, and small lumps called chalazions may develop. The cornea of the eye (the transparent covering over the lens) can also be affected, and in some cases vision will be affected. Most of these eye symptoms do not threaten sight, however.

Diagnosis

Diagnosis of rosacea is made by the presence of clinical symptoms. There is no specific test for the disease. Episodes of persistent flushing, redness (erythema) of the nose, cheeks, chin, and forehead, accompanied by pustules and papules are hallmarks of the disease. A dermatologist (skin disease specialist) will attempt to rule out a number of other diseases that have similar symptoms. Acne vulgaris is perhaps the disorder most commonly mistaken for rosacea, but acne patients do not have redness and spider-like veins. Blackheads and cysts are seen in acne patients, but not in those with rosacea.

Other diseases that produce some of the same symptoms as rosacea include perioral dermatitis , seborrheic dermatitis, and systemic lupus erythematosus .

Treatment

There is no cure for rosacea, but alternative and complementary treatments can be helpful in reducing the skin irritation and number of outbreaks associated with the disease. Green-tinted makeup can mask the redness associated with rosacea. Because rosacea may cause psychological distress, psychotherapy or support groups can be an important component of treatment.

Patients should avoid using skin care products that contain alcohol, witch hazel, peppermint , menthol, eucalyptus oil, or clove oil. Skin care products should be fragrance-free and have a smooth, non-grainy consistency. Men can shave with an electric razor to lessen skin irritation on the face.

Persons who are treated for rosacea with antibiotics over a long period are more prone to yeast infections . Long-term antibiotic use can decrease normal bacteria populations and increase the number of yeast. Eating a yeast-free diet (eliminating breads and other yeast products and sugars) can help to restore normal bacteria to the body.

Identifying food triggers

Certain foods are known to trigger an outbreak of rosacea. Although individual triggers vary, the following foods may aggravate rosacea: hot spices (pepper, paprika, and cayenne ), marinated meat, soy sauce, vanilla, vinegar, red plums, peas, lima and navy beans, sharp cheeses, cider, Asian food dishes, canned fish products, processed beef and pork, chocolate, tomatoes, citrus fruit, alcohol, and hot beverages. Nitrates, sulfites, and certain drugs can also trigger outbreaks. Food allergies can also cause rosacea. The three foods that most often cause food allergies are wheat products, sugar, and dairy products.

Rosacea patients should keep a food diary to identify the specific foods that trigger rosacea outbreaks. Outbreaks can occur hoursor as long as a dayafter the offending food has been eaten. The patient should stop eating a suspect food for a few months to observe the severity of the rosacea symptoms. If the rosacea improves, the patient can then eat a small amount of the offending food to confirm whether it triggers an outbreak. Once a rosacea trigger food is identified, it can be eliminated from the patient's diet.

Other treatments

Applying liquid-filled cold packs, a washcloth soaked in ice-cold water, or a compress of cold milk and ice-cold water to the neck and face can relieve flushing. Sucking on ice chips can also help relieve flushing. A cold compress of chamomile tea can soothe irritated skin. Applying ice to the face may feel good but it can cause frostbite, which would worsen the reddening.

Some practitioners advocate gentle circular massage for several minutes daily to the nose, cheeks, and fore-head. However, controlled studies on the effectiveness of this technique are lacking.

A deficiency of hydrochloric acid (HCl) in the stomach may be a cause of rosacea, and supplementation with HCl capsules (taken after meals) may bring relief in some cases.

Hypnosis may reduce stress , promote healthful behavior, and control bad habits. Hypnotherapy is especially useful in treating skin disease that can be triggered by emotions, including rosacea. As a complementary therapy, hypnosis has been shown to improve rosacea, especially the flushing component.

Nutritionists recommend eating more dark green vegetables such as kale, broccoli, asparagus, and spinach. These foods, and others that contain high levels of vitamins A and C, bioflavonoids , and beta-carotene, can improve rosacea by increasing capillary strength and boosting the immune system. Apple juice and dark grape juice drunk at room temperature between meals can help persons with rosacea.

A deficiency of B-complex vitamins can lead to rosacea. Vitamin E's antioxidant properties can help prevent skin damage. Zinc can speed wound healing. Omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acid deficiencies can lead to dry, irritated skin, which can worsen rosacea. Omega-3 fatty acids can be found in flaxseed oil, cod liver oil, salmon, mackerel, and herring. Omega-6 fatty acid is found in evening primrose oil .

Allopathic treatment

The mainstay of treatment for rosacea is oral antibiotics. These appear to work by reducing inflammation in the small blood vessels and structure of the skin, not by destroying bacteria that are present. One of the more widely used oral antibiotics is tetracycline. In many patients, antibiotics are effective against the papules and pustules that can appear on the face. But antibiotics appear to be less effective against the background redness, and they have no effect on telangiectasia. Patients frequently take a relatively high dose of antibiotics until their symptoms are controlled, and then they slowly reduce their daily dose to a level that just keeps their symptoms in check. Other oral antibiotics used include erythromycin and minocycline.

Some patients are concerned about long-term use of oral antibiotics. For them, a topical agent applied directly to the face may be tried in addition to an oral antibiotic or in its place. Topical antibiotics are also useful for controlling the papules and pustules of rosacea, but do not control the redness, flushing, and telangiectasias. The newest of these topical agents is metronidazole gel, which can be applied twice daily.

Vitamin A derivatives called retinoids also appear useful in the treatment of rosacea. An oral retinoid called isotretinoin, which is used in severe cases of acne, reduces the pustules and papules in severe cases of rosacea that do not respond to antibiotics. Isotretinoin must be taken with care, particularly in women of childbearing age, because the drug is known to cause birth defects.

Topical vitamin A compounds may have a role in the treatment of rosacea. Accumulating evidence suggests that topical isotretinoin and topical azelaic acid can reduce the redness and pimples.

For later stages of the disorder, a surgical procedure may be needed to improve the appearance of the skin. To remove the telangiectasias, a dermatologist may use an electrocautery device to apply an electrical current to the blood vessel. This procedure cuts off the blood to the blood vessel, effectively destroying it and eliminating its appearance as a red line. Special lasers, called tunable dye lasers, can selectively destroy these tiny blood vessels. A variety of surgical techniques can be used to improve the shape and appearance of a bulbous nose. Surgeons may use a scalpel or laser to remove excess tissue from the nose and restore a more natural appearance.

Expected results

The prognosis is good for controlling symptoms of rosacea and improving the appearance of the face. Many people require lifelong treatment and achieve good results. There is no known cure for the disorder.

Prevention

Rosacea cannot be prevented, but once its is correctly diagnosed, outbreaks can be treated and repeated episodes can be limited. Patients can reduce outbreaks of rosacea by following this advice:

  • Use mild soaps and cleansers. Avoiding anything that irritates the skin is a good preventive measure for persons with rosacea. Astringents and alcohol should be avoided.
  • Learn what triggers flushing. Reducing factors in the diet and environment that cause flushing of the face is another good preventive strategy. The specific things that provoke flushing vary considerably from person to person and it usually takes some trial and error to figure these out.
  • Cover the face. Limiting exposure of the face to excesses of heat and cold can also help. A sunscreen with a skin protection factor (SPF) of 15 or greater, used daily, can reduce rosacea outbreaks and limit the damage the sun causes to the skin and small blood vessels. Protective clothing (hats in the summer and scarves or ski masks in the winter) can reduce the skin's exposure to sun and cold temperatures.

Resources

BOOKS

Helm, Klaus F., and James G. Marks. Atlas of Differential Diagnosis in Dermatology. New York: Churchill Livingstone, 1998.

Macsai, Marian S., et al. "Acne Rosacea." In Eye and Skin disease. Edited by Mark J. Mannis, et al. Philadelphia: Lippincott-Raven, 1996.

PERIODICALS

Jansen, Thomas, and Gerd Plewig. "Rosacea: Classification and Treatment." Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine 90 (March 1997): 144150.

Litt, Jerome Z. "Rosacea: How to Recognize and Treat an Age-Related Skin Disease." Geriatrics 52 (November 1997): 39+.

Shenefelt, Philip D. "Hypnosis in Dermatology." Archives of Dermatology 136 (March 2000): 393399.

Thiboutot, Diane M. "Acne Rosacea." American Family Physician 50 (December 1994): 16911697.

ORGANIZATIONS

American Academy of Dermatology. 930 N. Meacham Road, PO Box 4014, Schaumburg, IL 60168-4014. (847) 330-0230. http://www.aad.org.

National Rosacea Society. 800 S. Northwest Highway, Suite 200, Barrington, IL 60010. (888) 662-5874. http://www.rosacea.org.

OTHER

"Rosacea." MotherNature.com. http://www.mothernature.com/library/books/homeseniors/rosacea.asp.

Belinda Rowland

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Rosacea

Rosacea

Definition

Rosacea is a skin disease typically appearing in people during their 30s and 40s. It is marked by redness (erythema) of the face, flushing of the skin, and the presence of hard pimples (papules) or pus-filled pimples (pustules), and small visible spider-like veins called telangiectasias. In later stages of the disease, the face may swell and the nose may take on a bulb-like appearance called rhinophyma.

Description

Rosacea produces redness and flushing of the skin, as well as pustules and papules. Areas of the face, including the nose, cheeks, forehead, and chin, are the primary sites, but some people experience symptoms on their necks, backs, scalp, arms, and legs.

The similarity in appearance of rosacea to acne led people in the past to erroneously call the disease acne rosacea or adult acne. Like acne, the skin can have pimples and papules. Unlike acne, however, people with rosacea do not have blackheads.

In early stages of rosacea, people typically experience repeated episodes of flushing. Later, areas of the face are persistently red, telangiectasia appear on the nose and cheeks, as well as inflamed papules and pustules. Over time, the skin may take on a roughened, orange peel texture. Very late in the disorder, a small group of patients with rosacea will develop rhinophyma, which can give the nose a bulb-like look.

Up to one half of patients with rosacea may experience symptoms related to their eyes. Ocular rosacea, as it is called, frequently precedes the other manifestations on the skin. Most of these eye symptoms do not threaten sight, however. Telangiectasia may appear around the borders of the eyelid, the eyelids may be chronically inflamed, and small lumps called chalazions may develop. The cornea of the eye, the transparent covering over the lens, can also be affected, and in some cases vision will be affected.

Causes and symptoms

There is no known specific cause of rosacea. A history of redness and flushing precedes the disease in most patients. The consensus among many experts is that multiple factors may lead to an overreaction of the facial blood vessels, which triggers flushing. Over time, persistent episodes of redness and flushing leave the face continually inflamed. Pimples and blood-vessel changes follow.

Certain genetic factors may also come into play, although these have not been fully described. The disease is more common in women and light-skinned, fair-haired people. It may be more common in people of Celtic background, although this is an area of disagreement among experts.

Certain antibiotics are useful in the treatment of rosacea, leading some researchers to suspect a bacterium or other infectious agent may be the cause. One of the newest suspects is a bacterium called Helicobacter pylori, which has been implicated in causing many cases of stomach ulcers but the evidence here is mixed.

Other investigators have observed that a particular parasite, the mite Demodex folliculorum, can be found in areas of the skin affected by rosacea. The mite can also be detected, however, in the skin of people who do not have the disease. It is likely that the mite does not cause rosacea, but merely aggravates it.

Diagnosis

Diagnosis of rosacea is made by the presence of clinical symptoms. There is no specific test for the disease. Episodes of persistent flushing, redness (erythema) of the nose, cheeks, chin, and forehead, accompanied by pustules and papules are hallmarks of the disease. A dermatologist will attempt to rule out a number of other diseases that have similar symptoms. Acne vulgaris is perhaps the disorder most commonly mistaken for rosacea, but redness and spider-like veins are not observed in patients with acne. Blackheads and cysts, however, are seen in acne patients, but not in those with rosacea.

Other diseases that produce some of the same symptoms as rosacea include perioral dermatitis and systemic lupus erythematosus.

Treatment

The mainstay of treatment for rosacea is oral antibiotics. These appear to work by reducing inflammation in the small blood vessels and structure of the skin, not by destroying bacteria that are present. Among the more widely used oral antibiotics is tetracycline. In many patients, antibiotics are effective against the papules and pustules that can appear on the face, but they appear less effective against the background redness, and they have no effect on telangiectasia. Patients frequently take a relatively high dose of antibiotics until their symptoms are controlled, and then they slowly reduce their daily dose to a level that just keeps their symptoms in check. Other oral antibiotics used include erythromycin and minocycline.

Some patients are concerned about long-term use of oral antibiotics. For them, a topical agent applied directly to the face may be tried in addition to an oral antibiotic, or in its place. Topical antibiotics are also useful for controlling the papules and pustules of rosacea, but do not control the redness, flushing, and telangiectasias. The newest of these topical agents is metronidazole gel, which can be applied twice daily. Like the oral antibiotics, topical preparations appear to work by reducing inflammation, not by killing bacteria.

Vitamin A derivatives, called retinoids, also appear useful in the treatment of rosacea. An oral retinoid, called isotretinoin, which is used in severe cases of acne also reduces the pustules and papules in severe cases of rosacea that do not respond to antibiotics. Isotretinoin must be taken with care, however, particularly in women of childbearing age. They must agree to a reliable form of contraception, because the drug is known to cause birth defects.

Topical vitamin A derivatives that are used in the treatment of acne also may have a role in the treatment of rosacea. Accumulating evidence suggests that topical isotretinoin and topical azelaic acid can reduce the redness and pimples. Some patients who use these medications experience skin irritation that tends to resolve with time.

For later stages of the disorder, a surgical procedure may be needed to improve the appearance of the skin. To remove the telangiectasias, a dermatologist may use an electrocautery device to apply a current to the blood vessel in order to destroy it. Special lasers, called tunable dye lasers, can also be adjusted to selectively destroy these tiny blood vessels.

A variety of surgical techniques can be used to improve the shape and appearance of a bulbous nose in the later stages of the disease. Surgeons may use a scalpel or laser to remove excess tissue from the nose and restore a more natural appearance.

Alternative treatment

Alternative treatments have not been extensively studied in rosacea. Some reports advocate gentle circular massage for several minutes daily to the nose, cheeks, and forehead. Scientifically controlled studies are lacking, however.

Many people are able to avoid outbreaks by reducing things that trigger flushing. Alcoholic beverages, hot beverages, and spicy foods are among the more common factors in the diet that can provoke flushing. Reducing or eliminating these items in the diet can help limit rosacea outbreaks in many people. Exposure to heat, cold, and sunlight are also known triggers of flushing. The specific things that provoke flushing vary considerably from person to person, however. It usually takes some trial and error to figure these out.

A deficiency in hydrochloric acid (HCl) in the stomach may be a cause of rosacea, and supplementation with HCl capsules may bring relief in some cases.

Prognosis

The prognosis for controlling symptoms of rosacea and improving the appearance of the face is good. Many people require life-long treatment and achieve good results. There is no known cure for the disorder.

Prevention

Rosacea cannot be prevented, but once correctly diagnosed, outbreaks can be treated and repeated episodes can be limited.

Use mild soaps

Avoiding anything that irritates the skin is a good preventive measure for people with rosacea. Mild soaps and cleansers are recommended. Astringents and alcohol should be avoided.

Learn what triggers flushing

Reducing factors in the diet and environment that cause flushing of the face is another good preventive strategy. Alcoholic and hot beverages, and spicy foods are among the more common triggers.

Use sunscreen

Limiting exposure of the face to excesses of heat and cold can also help. A sunscreen with a skin protection factor (SPF) of 15 or greater used daily can limit the damage to the skin and small blood vessels caused by the sun, and reduce outbreaks.

Resources

ORGANIZATIONS

American Academy of Dermatology. 930 N. Meacham Road, P.O. Box 4014, Schaumburg, IL 60168-4014. (847) 330-0230. Fax: (847) 330-0050. http://www.aad.org.

National Rosacea Society. 800 S. Northwest Highway, Suite 200, Barrington, IL 60010. (888) 662-5874. http://www.rosacea.org.

KEY TERMS

Blackhead A plug of fatty cells capped with a blackened mass.

Erythema A diffuse red and inflamed area of the skin.

Papule A small hard elevation of the skin.

Pustule A small pus-filled elevation of the skin.

Retinoid A synthetic vitamin A derivative used in the treatment of a variety of skin disorders.

Rhinophyma Long-term swelling and overgrowth in skin tissue of the nose that leaves it with a knobby bulb-like look.

Telangiectasia Small blood veins visible at the surface of the skin of the nose and cheeks.

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rosacea

rosacea (roh-zay-shiă) n. a chronic inflammatory disease of the face in which the skin becomes abnormally flushed. The disease occurs in both sexes and at all ages but is most common in women in their thirties.

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Rosacea

Rosacea

Definition

Rosacea is an acne-like chronic facial skin disorder affecting about 14 million citizens of the United States, especially persons with fair skin and who blush easily. Rosacea usually first appears intermittently when people are in the 30s, 40s, or 50s as a redness on cheeks, nose, chin, or forehead. This early stage is often dismissed as a complexion problem or as a sunburn. If the condition is not treated, the redness becomes permanent, with small blood vessels becoming visible. Bumps and pimples may develop, and the eyes may feel gritty and appear bloodshot. Especially in men the nose may become bumpy, red and swollen from excess tissue. Women usually develop rosacea on their cheeks and chin. In advanced cases, rosacea can cause facial disfigurement and disabling burning sensations. Rosacea cannot be cured but symptoms can be reduced and progression slowed through the use of medical treatment and modifications of lifestyle.

Description

Rosacea is not an infectious disease and there is no evidence that it can be transmitted through skin contact or inhalation. However, there is a possibility that rosacea can be inherited. A survey by the National Rosacea Society showed that almost 40 percent of rosacea patients could identify a relative with similar symptoms. Ethnicity may also be a factor, as people of Irish, English, Scandinavian, Scottish, Welsh, or Eastern European descent have elevated rates of rosacea, compared to the United States population as a whole.

Because of the effects of rosacea on personal appearance, the disease can result in significant social, psychological, and occupational difficulties if not treated. Patients may avoid public contact and social events and may miss work. The National Rosacea Society conducted a survey of more than 1,200 rosacea patients. Results of the survey indicated that 76 percent said rosacea's effect on their personal appearance had lowered their self-confidence and self-esteem; 69 percent felt embarrassed; and 63 percent reported difficulty in establishing new relationships because of the condition. Of those persons who described their rosacea as severe, 94 percent said it had damaged their self-confidence, and 77 percent reported that it had adversely affected their outlook on life.

Demographics

Rosacea affects approximately 14 million persons in the United States, although many people do not recognize that they have this disease. A Gallop survey indicated that seventy-eight percent of Americans are not aware of rosacea, do not know how to recognize the symptoms nor understand treatment options. The prevalence of rosacea is increasing, as the baby boom generation reaches the ages at which rosacea develops.

Causes and symptoms

The cause of rosacea is not yet definitely known. Many people who develop rosacea have a history of frequent blushing or flushing. Some researchers believe that rosacea is a vascular disorder because of the flushing, redness, and visible blood vessels associated with the disease. Others feel that the flushing may involve the nervous system, since a common trigger or aggravation of the conditions is emotional stress . Another theory is that increased blood flow during flushing may lead to an increase in levels of fluids in tissues, which accumulate faster than the lymphatic system can remove the fluids, thus resulting in swelling. This swelling may lead to skin thickening. A microscopic mite, Demodex folliculorum, a common inhabitant of human skin that feeds on dead skin cells, is found in higher numbers in rosacea patients, but it is not known whether the increased numbers of mites are a cause of rosacea or a result of the disease. Other theories include irritation of follicles, sun damage of connective tissue under the skin, or an abnormal immune or inflammatory response.

The long-term use of topical steroids may result in rosacea-like symptoms, referred to as steroid-induced rosacea.

Rosacea symptoms, for which a person should visit a dermatologist or other physician include:

  • redness of cheeks, nose, chin, or forehead
  • small visible blood vessels on the face
  • bumps or pimples on the face
  • watery or irritated eye

Facial burning, stinging, and itching are commonly associated with rosacea. Patients may also exhibit swelling of the face, especially in the area of the creases of the nose to the side of the mouth, resulting in baggy cheeks. This swelling can also contribute to excessive tissue on the nose, causing it to become bumpy and bulbous, in a condition called rhinophyma. Rarely does rosacea affect the neck, chest scalp, ears, or back, though rosacea has been reported in some patients to affect more than the face.

Hot flashes associated with menopause may result in a rosacea flare-up or even result in the initial onset of rosacea. Postmenopausal women with rosacea are more likely to also suffer from migraineheadaches .

QUESTIONS TO ASK YOUR DOCTOR

  • What lifestyle changes do I need to make?
  • What types of medications do I need to use, based on my symptoms and the effects of the disease on my life?
  • How can I control my triggers so as to minimize outbreaks?

Ocular rosacea occurs when the eyes are also affected. Eye symptoms include a watery or bloodshot appearance as well as a dry, gritty feeling associated with burning, itching, or stinging. Rosacea patients are also susceptible to styes, light sensitivity, and blurred vision. If untreated, the patient may develop decreased visual acuity.

Diagnosis

Rosacea is best diagnosed and treated by dermatologists, physicians who specialize in diseases of the skin. Patients with eye problems associated with rosacea should consult with an ophthalmologist also. There are no diagnostic tests for rosacea. The physician makes the diagnosis after a thorough examination of symptoms such as redness, flushing, bumps and pimples, burning, itching, or stinging, and a medical history.

Treatment

Rosacea is treated through the life-long use of medical therapy and lifestyle modifications. Since each patient may have different symptoms and different triggers that aggravate the disease, a treatment program is developed individually in conjunction with the patient's physician. Oral antibiotics and topical antibiotic medications are used to treat rosacea initially, followed by long-term use of topical therapy to keep the disease in remission. The effects of antibiotics are thought to be due to anti-inflammatory properties rather than antibacterial effects. The medicines usually work best on reducing pimples and bumps, while treatment of the skin redness is more difficult. Laser therapy, pulsed light sources, or other surgical treatments can be used to remove visible blood vessels, to reduce redness, or to correct nose disfigurement. Cardiovascular medicines are sometimes used to control severe flushing. Eye symptoms are usually treated with oral antibiotics and opthalmic therapy.

Alternative medical treatments that have been used to treat rosacea include the use of chrysanthellum indicum cream, green tea cream, niacinamide cream, zinc cream, and azelaic acid cream. Digestive enzymes and B vitamins have also been used as alternative treatments. A health care provider should be consulted before and while using these alternative treatments.

About half of patients with rosacea may experience dry and flaky skin, requiring daily moisturizing.

Nutrition/Dietetic concerns

A person with rosacea should avoid foods that may result in facial flushing, such as spicy foods or foods to which the person is allergic. However, it is possible that there may not be a dietary link involved. To determine if any foods are associated with rosacea symptoms, the use of an elimination/challenge diet under the supervision of a health practitioner can be used, which involves removing suspected foods from the diet for one to two weeks and them systematically reintroducing them to the diet to isolate foods that my cause reactions.

Therapy

Patients need to develop a gentle skin care routine that is compatible with rosacea. A mild, non-abrasive cleanser should be used, followed by a rinse with lukewarm water and face blotting with a thick, soft cotton towel. Patients should use a mild sunscreen with an SPF of 15 or greater. Cosmetics with green tints, which offset the redness, may be used to conceal rosacea symptoms. Medication should be used continuously, even between flare-ups and remission in order to control the disease. There are few long-term effects due to continuous therapy, and the medications do not lose their effectiveness over time.

Prognosis

The symptoms of rosacea usually become progressively worse without treatment. However, with treatment and lifestyle changes to avoid known triggers of outbreaks, rosacea can be controlled on a long-term basis. Usually it takes up to two months of treatment before an improvement in the skin is noted. As the disease is chronic, the patient may exhibit relapses and remissions through time. A study of 48 patients with rosacea showed that in 48 percent, the disease had disappeared, with an average duration of the disease being nine years. However, in 52 percent of the patients, after 13 years, the rosacea was still active.

KEY TERMS

Flushing —A redness of the face and neck, caused by increased blood flow through dilated facial blood vessels. During a flush, a patient with rosacea can turn various shades of red, depending on the amount of blood flowing through the skin. Depending on the stage of rosacea, a facial flush can last only a few seconds or be long-standing, lasting days, weeks, or months.

Rhinophyma —A form of rosacea characterized by chronic redness, inflammation, swelling, and increased tissue growth of the nose. The skin of the nose may thicken and have large pores, resembling the skin of an orange.

Prevention

A person with rosacea may experience a flare-up (a greater outbreak of redness, bumps, or pimples) when exposed to factors (called triggers) that cause the person to flush or overheat the face. Surveys conducted by the National Rosacea Society found that the most common triggers, listed in order mentioned by patients, were sun exposure, emotional stress, wind, hot weather, alcohol consumption, moderate to heavy exercise , hot baths, cold weather, spicy foods, humidity, indoor heat (for example, from showers and baths, hot cars, hair blowers, lights, or body heat in crowded places), certain skin care products, heated beverages, certain cosmetics, medications, medical conditions, certain fruits, marinated meats, certain vegetables, and possibly dairy products Individuals suffering from rosacea are encouraged to maintain a diary of potential triggers and and resulting rosacea symptoms, in order to identify their specific factors that are linked to flare-ups. These factors can then be reduced or eliminated for better control of the disease. However, it may be difficult for patients to avoid potential triggers, as they may encounter 20 to 50 triggers per day.

To prevent a rosacea outbreak due to exercise, a patient should work out in the early morning or late evening, when the temperatures are cooler. Workouts can be broken into more frequent, shorter intervals, and the room can be kept cooler by the use of a fan or an open window. A damp towel can be kept on the neck, and cold fluids or ice chips can be ingested. Low intensity or water aerobics should also be considered. Strenuous activities such as aerobics, jogging, and weightlifting should be avoided.

Caregiver concerns

A person on long-term antibiotics may exhibit common side effects, including nausea or vomiting, diarrhea , photosensitivity, allergic reactions, and vaginal yeast infections. A care giver of an elderly person being treated for rosacea should watch out for these possible side effects. The care giver also must be careful to help the patient avoid rosacea triggers and help the patient maintain a gentle skin care routine.

Resources

BOOKS

Barrows, Brady. Rosacea 101: Includes the Rosacea Diet Bloomington, IN: iUniverse Publishers, 2007.

Icon Health Publications. Rosacea-A Medical Dictionary, Bibliography, and Annotated Research Guide to Internet References. San Diego, CA: Icon Health Publications, 2004.

Lindstrom, Ann-Marie. The Rosacea Handbook: A Self Help Guide. Encinitas, CA: United Research Publishers, 2000

Nase, Geoffrey Beating Rosacea: Vascular, Ocular, and Acne Forms: A Must_Have Guide to Understanding and Treating Rosacea> Indianapolis, IN: Nase Publications, 2001.

ORGANIZATIONS

National Rosacea Society, Suite 200, 800 South Northwest Highway, Barrington, Illinois, 1-888-662-5874, [email protected], http://rosacea.org.

International Rosacea Organization, http://www.internationalrosaceafoundation.org/.

Judith L. Sims

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