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Regurgitation

Regurgitation

An explanatory theory of materialization phenomena that suggests that the white substance issuing from a medium's body, which is taken for ectoplasm, is something that the medium swallowed before the sitting and brought up at the appropriate moment. The theory was put forward by the Society for Psychical Research, London, in the case of Eva C., accused of fraud in 1922. Wide public attention was also aroused by the case of the British medium Helen Duncan, in which the theory was considered a satisfactory explanation.

Sources:

Price, Harry. Regurgitation and the Duncan Mediumship. Council at the Rooms of the National Laboratory of Psychical Research, London, 1931.

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regurgitate

re·gur·gi·tate / riˈgərjəˌtāt/ • v. [tr.] bring (swallowed food) up again to the mouth: gulls regurgitate food for the chicks. ∎ fig. repeat (information) without analyzing or comprehending it: facts that can then be regurgitated at examinations. DERIVATIVES: re·gur·gi·ta·tion / riˌgərjəˈtāshən/ n.

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regurgitation

regurgitation refers most commonly to stomach contents moving back up into the oesophagus or all the way to the mouth — but short of the full reflex drama of vomiting. Also applied to backflow of blood through a leaking heart valve.

Stuart Judge


See heart; indigestion.

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regurgitation

regurgitation (ri-ger-ji-tay-shŏn) n.
1. the bringing up of undigested material from the stomach to the mouth (see vomiting).

2. the flowing back of a liquid in a direction opposite to the normal one. See aortic regurgitation, mitral regurgitation.

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regurgitate

regurgitate gush back again XVII; cast out again XVIII. f. pp. stem of medL. regurgitāre, f. RE- + late L. gurgitāre engulf, f. gurges, -git- whirlpool.
So regurgitation XVII. — medL.

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regurgitate

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