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adipose tissue

adipose tissue Body fat–the cells that synthesize and store fat, releasing it for metabolism in fasting. Also known as white adipose tissue, to distinguish it from the metabolically more active brown adipose tissue, which is involved in heat production to maintain body temperature. Much of the body fat reserve is subcutaneous; in addition there is adipose tissue around the organs, which serves to protect them from physical damage. In lean people, 15–25% of body weight is adipose tissue, increasing with age; the proportion is greater in people who are overweight or obese. Adipose tissue contains 82–88% fat, 2–2.6% protein, and 10–14% water. The energy yield of adipose tissue is 8000–9000 kcal (34–38 MJ) per kg or 3600–4000 kcal (15.1–16.8 MJ) per pound.

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adipose tissue

adipose tissue A body tissue comprising cells containing fat and oil. It is found chiefly below the skin (see subcutaneous tissue) and around major organs (such as the kidneys and heart), acting as an energy reserve, providing insulation and protection, and generating heat. See brown fat; thermogenesis.

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adipose tissue

adipose tissue (ad-i-pohs) n. fibrous connective tissue packed with masses of fat cells. It forms a thick layer under the skin and occurs around the kidneys and in the buttocks.

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adipose tissue

adipose tissue (fatty tissue) Connective tissue made up of body cells which store large globules of fat.

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adipose tissue

adipose tissue Connective tissue that contains large cells in which fat is stored.

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adipose tissue

adipose tissue (ăd´əpōs´): see connective tissue.

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