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Remorse

554. Remorse (See also Regret.)

  1. Ayenbite of Inwit (Remorse of Conscience ) Middle English version of medieval moral treatise, c. 1340. [Br. Lit.: Barnhart, 74]
  2. Deianira commits suicide out of remorse for unwittingly having killed husband, Hercules. [Gk. Myth.: Benét, 709]
  3. Hermione commits suicide upon the funeral pyre of her beloved Pyrrhus for having instigated his murder. [Fr. Drama: Racine Andromaque ]
  4. Jocasta commits suicide when she realizes she has married son, Oedipus. [Gk. Lit.: Oedipus Rex ]
  5. Lord Jim tormented by his memory of having saved himself from a sinking ship with 800 Muslims aboard. [Br. Lit.: Joseph Conrad Lord Jim in Magill I, 522]
  6. Manfred magician, living alone in an Alpine castle, broods on his alienation from mankind and on his destruction of the woman he loved. [Br. Poetry: Byron Manfred]
  7. Mannon, Orin crazed by guilt for inciting mothers suicide. [Am. Lit.: Mourning Becomes Electra ]
  8. Oedipus blinds self upon learning of his crimes. [Gk. Lit.: Oedipus Rex ]
  9. Othello commits suicide from guilt for wifes murder. [Br. Lit.: Othello ]

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remorse

re·morse / riˈmôrs/ • n. deep regret or guilt for a wrong committed: they were filled with remorse and shame. DERIVATIVES: re·morse·ful / -fəl/ adj. re·morse·ful·ly / -fəlē/ adv.

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remorse

remorse XIV. — OF. remors (mod. remords) — medL. remorsus, f. remors-, pp. stem of L. remordēre vex, torment, f. RE- + mordere bite.

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