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COLON

COLON. The PUNCTUATION mark (:). It has an anticipatory effect, leading from what precedes to what follows. The following are the main uses: (1) To introduce a list of items: You will need the following: a pen, pencil, rubber, piece of paper, and ruler. (2) To introduce speech or quoted material, as a stronger alternative to the comma: I told them last week: ‘Do not in any circumstances open this door.’ (3) To lead or ‘point’ from one CLAUSE to another: from introduction to theme (I want to say this: we are deeply grateful to all of you); from statement to example (It was not easy: to begin with, I had to find the right house); from cause to effect (The weather was bad: so we stayed at home); from premiss to conclusion (There are hundreds of wasps in the garden: there must be a nest there); from statement to explanation (I gave up: I had tried everything without success). (4) To introduce an antithesis or highlight a contrast: He died young: but he died rich; They spoke bitterly: and yet they were forgiving. (5) To produce a staccato or paratactic effect, either by replacing a conjunction such as but (I called: you did not answer) or in a progression or sequence (He arrived: he knocked at the door: we waited: he went away). See SEMICOLON.

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"COLON." Concise Oxford Companion to the English Language. . Encyclopedia.com. 22 Jul. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"COLON." Concise Oxford Companion to the English Language. . Retrieved July 22, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/colon

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colon

co·lon1 / ˈkōlən/ • n. a punctuation mark (:) indicating: ∎  that a writer is introducing a quotation or a list of items. ∎  that a writer is separating two clauses of which the second expands or illustrates the first. ∎  a statement of proportion between two numbers: a ratio of 10:1. ∎  the separation of hours from minutes (and minutes from seconds) in a statement of time given in numbers: 4:30 p.m. ∎  the number of the chapter and verse respectively in biblical references: Exodus 3:2. co·lon2 • n. Anat. the main part of the large intestine, which passes from the cecum to the rectum and absorbs water and electrolytes from food that has remained undigested.

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colon

colon 2 member of a sentence; the punctuation mark (:). XVI. — L. cōlon — Gr. kôlon limb, clause.

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colon (in punctuation)

colon, in writing: see punctuation.

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Notes:
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