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Pegasus

Pegasus

A winged horse in Greek mythology, Pegasus was supposedly the offspring of the sea god Poseidon and the Gorgon Medusa. According to legend, Pegasus was born from the blood that spurted from Medusa's neck when the hero Perseus killed her. Pegasus served Perseus until his death and afterward went to the home of the Muses. The water that gave the Muses their inspiration had dried up, so Pegasus stamped his hoof and created a spring.

Gorgon one of three ugly monsters who had snakes for hair, staring eyes, and huge wings

Muse one of nine sister goddesses who presided over the arts and sciences

With the help of the goddess Athena*, the hero Bellerophon later tamed Pegasus and rode the horse when he slew the monster called the Chimaera. Later Bellerophon tried to ride Pegasus to the top of Mount Olympus* so that he could join the Greek gods. However, Zeus* caused a fly to bite Pegasus, and the horse threw Bellerophon to earth, crippling him for life.

See also Bellerophon; Medusa; Muses; Perseus.

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Pegasus (in Greek mythology)

Pegasus, in Greek mythology, winged horse that carries the thunderbolt of Zeus. He sprang full-grown from the neck of the dying Gorgon Medusa. With a slash of his hoof, he created the Hippocrene, a sacred spring of the Muses on Mt. Helicon. Hence, he has often been associated with the arts, especially poetry. Pegasus was captured by Bellerophon, who rode him through many adventures. His name indicates a pre-Greek origin.

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Pegasus

Pegasus in Greek mythology, a winged horse which sprang from the blood of Medusa when Perseus cut off her head. Pegasus was ridden by Perseus in his rescue of Andromeda, and by Bellerophon when he fought the Chimera; the spring Hippocrene arose from a blow of his hoof.

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Pegasus

Pegasus In Greek mythology, winged horse. Born out of the blood of Medusa, it was tamed by Bellerophon and helped him in his battles. Later, it carried the thunderbolts of Zeus.

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