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cordon

cordon.
1. String- or belt-course, usually a band, projecting slightly from a wall, normally used in connection with fortifications.

2. Slightly projecting step or riser at the lower edge of each part of a stepped ramp so that each section between steps has less of an inclination than the ramp as a whole (called scala cordonata or scala a cordoni), for surer footing. It is essentially a step-division in an inclined plane.

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cordon

cordon cordon bleu a cook of the highest class. The term (in French, literally ‘blue ribbon’) is recorded from the mid 18th century; the blue ribbon once signified the highest order of chivalry in the reign of the Bourbon kings.
cordon sanitaire a guarded line preventing anyone from leaving an area infected by a disease and thus spreading it; the term is recorded from the 19th century.

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cordon

cor·don / ˈkôrdn/ • n. 1. a line or circle of police, soldiers, or guards preventing access to or from an area or building. 2. an ornamental cord or braid. 3. Archit. another term for stringcourse. • v. [tr.] (cordon off) prevent access to or from (an area or building) by surrounding it with police or other guards.

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Cordon

Cordon

a continuous line or circle of persons or objects forming a barrier around a person, place, or building; a string or row of stones. See also chain.

Examples: cordon of admirers, 1854; of strike pickets; of police, 1883; cordon sanitaire; of troops.

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cordon

cordon projecting course of stones XVI; line of military posts or police XVIII. — It. cordone, augm. of corda CORD; superseded by F. cordon.

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cordon

cordonAbaddon, gladden, gladdon, Ibadan, madden, sadden •abandon, Brandon, Rwandan, Ugandan •Baden, Baden-Baden, Coloradan, garden, harden, lardon, Nevadan, pardon •Wiesbaden • bear garden •tea garden •Armageddon, deaden, leaden, redden •Eldon, Sheldon •Brendan, tendon •Dresden •Aden, Aidan, Haydn, laden, maiden •handmaiden •cedarn, cotyledon, dicotyledon, Eden, monocotyledon, Sweden •wealden •bestridden, forbidden, hidden, midden, outridden, ridden, stridden, unbidden •Wimbledon •linden, Lindon, Swindon •Wisden • Mohammedan • Myrmidon •harridan • hagridden • Sheridan •bedridden • Macedon • Huntingdon •Dryden, guidon, Leiden, Poseidon, Sidon, widen •Culloden, hodden, modern, sodden, trodden •Cobden • downtrodden •Auden, broaden, cordon, Gordon, Hordern, Jordan, warden •churchwarden • louden • bounden •loden, Snowdon •beholden, embolden, golden, olden •hoyden • Bermudan • wooden •Mukden • gulden • sudden •Blunden, London •Riordan • bourdon • bombardon •celadon • Clarendon •burden, guerdon

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