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arcade

arcade, series of arches supported by columns or piers. An arcade may stand free; if it is attached to a wall it is called a wall arcade or a blind arcade. The earliest-known arcades were in Roman architecture, in which piers, ornamented with engaged columns carrying an entablature, formed the arch supports. However, in Diocletian's palace at Spalato there are arches supported by columns and resting directly upon their capitals, of the type that was given full development in Romanesque and Gothic architecture. In the early Christian basilica, columnar arcades separated the nave and side aisles and supported the wall of the clerestory. From this beginning the rich system of bays used in Romanesque and Gothic church interiors was developed, in which lofty arcades extended the full length of the nave. Both freestanding and blind arcades were used in Romanesque facades (notably in N Italy) and in the west fronts of English and French Gothic cathedrals, where the arches were often filled with statues of saints. Richly designed arcades surrounded the enclosed cloisters of the medieval and Renaissance monasteries; they were similarly used in the courts of houses in Italy and Spain and in the courtyards of Islamic mosques. The Romanesque structures of Spain, Sicily, and S Italy made frequent use of arcades composed of interlacing arches, in which the arch rings overlap to alternate columns or piers. Continuous arcades, extending over sidewalks, are common in Italian cities, notably in Bologna.

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arcade

arcade.
1. Series of arches on the same plane, supported by colonnettes, columns, piers, or pilasters. Varieties of arcade include:alternating: with arches springing from the ends of two-column colonnades, resembling a series of overlapping serlianas;blind: arcade engaged with or attached to a wall, also called surface-or wall-arcade;coupled: carried on coupled columns;interlacing or intersecting: overlapping arcades, e.g. Romanesque overlapping arcades, producing a series of pointed arches, as in Southwell Minster, Notts. (C12);nave: series of arches on piers separating the nave from the aisle and supporting the clerestorey in a church;regular: any series of repetitive arches, also called a simple arcade;screen: arcade standing on its own as a feature, or used as a screen;simple: see regular above;surface: see blind above;syncopated: two rows of arcade, one in front of the other, with the colonnette shafts of one set in front of the centres of the arches behind, as in Lincoln Cathedral;wall: see blind above.

2. Row of vertical arcade-posts carrying the arcade-plate, and set between the nave or central area and aisles of a timber-framed aisled building.

3. Top-lit roofed passage with shops on either side, known as a shopping-arcade, equivalent to the galerie, galleria, or passage on the Continent.

4. Avenue arched over with trees and shrubs.

4. Avenue arched over with trees and shrubs.

Bibliography

Alcock,, Barley,, Dixon,, & and Meeson (1996);
Geist (1983);
MacKeith (1986)

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arcade

ar·cade / ärˈkād/ • n. 1. a covered passageway with arches along one or both sides. ∎  a covered walk with stores along one or both sides. ∎ Archit. a series of arches supporting a wall, or set along it. 2. short for video arcade. DERIVATIVES: ar·cad·ed adj. ar·cad·ing n.

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arcade

arcade arched passage. XVIII. — F. — Pr. arcada or It. arcata, f. Rom. *arca ARCH1; see -ADE.

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arcade

arcadeabrade, afraid, aid, aide, ambuscade, arcade, balustrade, barricade, Belgrade, blade, blockade, braid, brigade, brocade, cannonade, carronade, cascade, cavalcade, cockade, colonnade, crusade, dissuade, downgrade, enfilade, esplanade, evade, fade, fusillade, glade, grade, grenade, grillade, handmade, harlequinade, homemade, invade, jade, lade, laid, lemonade, limeade, made, maid, man-made, marinade, masquerade, newlaid, orangeade, paid, palisade, parade, pasquinade, persuade, pervade, raid, serenade, shade, Sinéad, spade, staid, stockade, stock-in-trade, suede, tailor-made, they'd, tirade, trade, Ubaid, underpaid, undismayed, unplayed, unsprayed, unswayed, upbraid, upgrade, wade •nightshade • renegade • decade •Medicaid • motorcade • switchblade •Adelaide • accolade • rollerblade •marmalade • razor blade • handmaid •barmaid • Teasmade • milkmaid •dairymaid • bridesmaid • housemaid •chambermaid •parlourmaid (US parlormaid) •mermaid • nursemaid • escapade •ram raid • centigrade • multigrade •comrade • retrograde • lampshade •eyeshade • sunshade

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Arcade

Arcade ★½ 1993 (R)

All the kids in town are desperate to play the new virtual reality game Arcade, only the game is just a little too real. Seems it can transport you into another world with its stunning graphics and sound effects but you really put your life on the line. Only Alex (Ward) worries when kids start to disappear and she decides to battle the game for their lives. 85m/C VHS . Megan Ward, Peter Billingsley, John de Lancie, Sharon Farrell, Seth Green, Humberto Ortiz, Jonathan Fuller, Norbert Weisser; D: Albert Pyun; W: David S. Goyer; M: Alan Howarth.

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