dub

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dub1 / dəb/ • v. (dubbed , dub·bing ) 1. [tr.] give an unofficial name or nickname to (someone or something): the media dubbed anorexia “the slimming disease.” ∎  make (someone) a knight by the ritual touching of the shoulder with a sword: he should be dubbed Sir Hubert. 2. [tr.] dress (an artificial fishing fly) with strands of fur or wool or with other material. ∎  incorporate (fur, wool, or other materials) into a fishing fly. 3. [tr.] smear (leather) with grease. Compare with dubbin. 4. trim or make smooth (wood) with an adze. dub2 • v. (dubbed , dub·bing ) [tr.] 1. provide (a film) with a soundtrack in a different language from the original: the film will be dubbed into French and Flemish. ∎  add (sound effects or music) to a film or a recording: background sound can be dubbed in at the editing stage. 2. make a copy of (a sound or video recording). ∎  transfer (a recording) from one medium to another. ∎  combine (two or more sound recordings) into one composite soundtrack. • n. 1. an instance of dubbing sound effects or music: the level of the dub can be controlled manually. 2. a style of popular music originating from the remixing of recorded music (esp. reggae), typically with the removal of some vocals and instruments and the exaggeration of bass guitar. dub3 inf. • n. an inexperienced or unskillful person. • v. (dubbed , dub·bing ) [tr.] Golf misplay (a shot).

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DUB. A clipping of double.
1. To alter a soundtrack, as in dubbing a film, especially to re-express dialogue in a different language, or to use a different voice, series of sounds, etc.: dubbingGone with the Windinto German; His voice was often dubbed for special effect.

2. To alter a soundtrack by removing some parts and adding or changing others. To dub in means to add (music, speech, etc.) to a film or tape: They'll dub the songs in later.

3. (Used especially of Afro-Caribbean disc jockeys speaking Creole) improvising against a soundtrack or a piece of recorded music. Dub is an especially Jamaican style of delivery that is associated with REGGAE and has spread in recent years to the UK, US, and West Africa. Performance poetry of this kind is called dub poetry and toasting; those who engage in it are dub poets. Compare RAP. See JAMAICAN CREOLE, RASTA TALK.

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Dub (d. 966), king of ‘Scotland’ (962–6). Son of Malcolm I. He succeeded on the death of Indulf at the hands of Norwegian raiders. He beat off a challenge for the throne by Indulf's son Cuilén in 965, at the battle of Duncrub (9 miles south-west of Perth). This may have marked the end of a period of dynastic solidarity which (with the possible exception of Malcolm I's accession in the early 940s) had seen no violent competition for the kingship for 75 years. Dub was not vanquished by dynastic rivalry, however, but by the men of Moray at Forres, an event which apparently coincided with an eclipse of the sun on 20 July 966. It is likely that this defeat undid whatever his father had gained by his victory in Moray.

Dauvit Broun

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dub invest with a dignity (spec. that of knighthood) XI; dress, trim XIII; spec. in tanning; smear with grease XVII. Late OE. *dubbian, in phr. dubbade tō rīdere, ‘dubbed to knight’, knighted, modelled on AN. aduber a chevaler. — AN. duber, aphetic of aduber, OF, adober (mod. adouber) equip with armour, repair, mend; of Gmc. orig.
Hence dubbin, dubbing preparation of grease for softening and waterproofing leather. XVIII; see -ING 1.

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dubblub, bub, chub, Chubb, club, cub, drub, dub, flub, grub, hub, nub, pub, rub, scrub, shrub, slub, snub, stub, sub, tub •Beelzebub • hubbub • syllabub •wolfcub • nightclub • bathtub •twintub • washtub

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dub. Old Eng. for tabor.