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Melancholy

437. Melancholy (See also Grief.)

  1. Acheron river of woe in the underworld. [Gk. Myth.: Howe, 5]
  2. Anatomy of Melancholy lists causes, symptoms, and characteristics of melancholy. [Br. Lit.: Anatomy of Melancholy ]
  3. Barton, Amos beset by woes. [Br. Lit.: Sad Fortunes of Amos Barton in Walsh Modern, 45]
  4. black bile humor effecting temperament of gloominess. [Medieval Physiology: Hall, 130]
  5. blues melancholy, bittersweet music born among American Negroes. [Am. Music: Scholes, 113]
  6. Cargill, Rev. Josiah serious, moody, melancholic minister. [Br. Lit.: St. Ronans Well ]
  7. Carstone, Richard driven to gloom by collapse of expectations. [Br. Lit.: Bleak House ]
  8. cave of Trophonius oracle so awe-inspiring, consulters never smiled again. [Gk. Myth.: Brewer Dictionary, 1103]
  9. Eeyore amusingly gloomy, morose donkey. [Childrens Lit.: Winnie-the-Pooh ]
  10. Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard meditative poem of a melancholy mood. [Br. Lit.: Harvey, 266]
  11. Ellis Island immigration center where many families were separated; isle of tears. [Am. Hist.: Flexner, 193]
  12. Gummidge, Mrs. lone lorn creetur with melancholy disposition. [Br. Lit.: David Copperfield ]
  13. Hamlet black mood dominates his consciousness. [Brit. Lit.: Shakespeare Hamlet ]
  14. hare flesh brings melancholy to those who eat it. [Animal Symbolism: Mercatante, 125]
  15. Il Penseroso poem celebrating the pleasures of melancholy and solitude. [Br. Lit.: Milton Il Penseroso in Magill IV, 577]
  16. Jaques can suck melancholy out of a song. [Br. Lit.: As You Like It ]
  17. Mock Turtle forever weeping and bemoaning his fate. [Br. Lit.: Alices Adventures in Wonderland ]
  18. Mudville no joy here when Casey struck out. [Am. Sports Lit.: Casey at the Bat in Turlin, 642]
  19. Orpheus composed, sang many melancholic songs in memory of deceased Eurydice. [Gk. Myth.: Orpheus and Eurydice, Magill I, 700701]
  20. Roquentin, Antoine discomfited by his existences purposelessness, solitarily despairs. [Fr. Lit.: Nausea ]
  21. Sad Sack hapless and helpless soldier; resigned to his fate. [Comics: Horn, 595596]
  22. Valley of the Shadow of Death lifes gloominess. [O.T.: Psalms 23:4]
  23. Wednesdays child full of woe. [Nurs. Rhyme: Opie, 309]
  24. yew tree symbolizes grief. [Flower Symbolism: Flora Symbolica, 178]

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melancholy

mel·an·chol·y / ˈmelənˌkälē/ • n. a deep, pensive, and long-lasting sadness. ∎  another term for melancholia (as a mental condition). ∎  hist. another term for black bile. • adj. sad, gloomy, or depressed: she felt a little melancholy the dog has a melancholy expression. ∎  causing or expressing sadness; depressing: the study makes melancholy if instructive reading. DERIVATIVES: mel·an·chol·ic / ˌmelənˈkälik/ adj. mel·an·chol·i·cal·ly / ˌmelənˈkälək(ə)lē/ adv. ORIGIN: Middle English: from Old French melancolie, via late Latin from Greek melankholia, from melas, melan- ‘black’ + kholē ‘bile,’ an excess of which was formerly believed to cause depression.

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Melancholy

268. Melancholy

See also 28. ATTITUDES ; 279. MOODS

lypemania
an abnormal tendency toward deep melancholy.
melancholia
a condition of abnormal gloom or depression, of ten of an intensity to become a form of insanity. melancholiac , n., adj. melancholie , n., adj.
melancholy
1. black bile, one of the four bodily humors, formerly believed to be the cause of gloom, ill temper, and depression.
2. melancholia.
3. a pensive, contemplative mood.
4. Obsolete, ill temper. melancholiac , n., adj. melancholie , n., adj.
tristimania
melancholia.

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melancholy

melancholy †morbid condition of having too much ‘black bile’; † ill-temper; sadness and depression. XIV. — (O)F. mélancolie — late L. melancholia — Gr. melagkholíā, f. mélās, melan- black + kholḗ bile; see GALL1, -Y3.
So melancholic, melancholious XIV. Both adjs. were gen. superseded by an adj. use of the sb. (XVI), the termination of which suggests an adj. formation.

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melancholy

melancholy a deep, pensive, and long-lasting sadness. In the Middle Ages, melancholy was also synonymous with black bile, one of the four bodily humours.

The word comes ultimately from Greek melas ‘black’ + kholē ‘bile’, an excess of which was formerly believed to cause depression.

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melancholy

melancholybiyearly, really, yearly •Beardsley • lawyerly • immediately •hourly • cowardly • surely • marbly •pebbly •neighbourly (US neighborly) •dribbly, scribbly •Kimberley •bobbly, wobbly •Stromboli •bubbly, lubberly, rubbly, stubbly •husbandly • hyperbole •creaturely, teacherly •Wycherley • elderly •fiddly, twiddly •orderly • puddly •Offaly, waffly •snuffly •straggly, waggly •spangly • laggardly • beggarly •jiggly, squiggly, wiggly, wriggly •niggardly • sluggardly • leisurely •gingerly • soldierly • curmudgeonly •rascally • treacly • tickly • broccoli •knuckly • melancholy • sailorly •scholarly • gentlemanly • seamanly •anomaly • yeomanly • womanly •mannerly • panoply • Connolly •Gallipoli, ripply, tripoli •dimply •monopoly, oligopoly •rumply • purply • matronly •squirrelly • scoundrelly • Thessaly •thistly • tinselly • muscly •Natalie, philately, rattly •dastardly •headmasterly, masterly •schoolmasterly • westerly • painterly •easterly • Italy • winterly •sisterly, systole •writerly • doctorly • quarterly •fatherly • grandfatherly • weatherly •northerly •brotherly, motherly, southerly •grandmotherly • gravelly • Beverley •weaselly • frizzly • wizardly • miserly •Rosalie

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