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Marion's Brigade

Marion's Brigade

MARION'S BRIGADE. After being named brigadier general of the South Carolina militia in December 1780, Marion was given command of all regiments east of the Santee, Wateree, and Catawba Rivers. The brigade's composition changed frequently, but began with the cavalry under the command of Colonel Peter Horry and was comprised of troops under Major Lemuel Benson and Captains John Baxter, John Postell, Daniel Conyers, and James McCauley. Lieutenant Colonel Hugh Horry (Peter's brother) commanded the foot regiment, while Colonel Adam McDonald was on parole. Companies were headed by Major John James and Captains John James, James Postell, and James Witherspoon. Colonel Hugh Ervin was Marion's second in command. Serving as aides de camp were Captains John Milton, Lewis Ogier, and Thomas Elliott, the latter handling the semiliterate commander's correspondence. An estimated 2,500 men served at one time or another in the brigade.

SEE ALSO Marion, Francis.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Rankin, Hugh F. Francis Marion: The Swamp Fox. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Company, 1973.

                            revised by Steven D. Smith

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