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United Nations Commission on Sustainable Development

United Nations Commission on Sustainable Development

A committee of 53 nations created by the United Nations General Assembly for the purpose of implementing recommendations made during the 1992 United Nations Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro. Its overriding goal is to develop economies around the world while preserving the environment and existing natural resources . Major issues of interest include water quality , desertification , forest and species protection, toxic chemicals , and atmospheric and oceanic pollution .

Chaired by Malaysian representative Razalie Ismail, the commission endeavors to put into action the specific policies of Agenda 21, a United Nations plan aimed at stoppingor at least slowing downglobal environmental degradation . The United States has taken a strong leadership role in supporting the commission's objectives. Under President Bill Clinton and Vice President Albert Gore, the President's Council on Sustainable Development was created to balance environmental policies with sound economic development within this country.

With the formation of the commission, several developing countries have raised concerns that the group will withhold financial aid to them based on their environmental practices. Likewise, the more developed countries (MDC) worry that money and technology allotted to the less developed countries (LDC) will go toward other needs rather than towards protecting the environment. The commission has no legal authority to enforce any of its policies but relies on publicity and international pressure to achieve its goals.


RESOURCES

ORGANIZATIONS

Secretariat of the United Nations Commission on Sustainable Development, United Nations Plaza, Room DC2-2220, New York, NY USA 10017 (212) 963-3170, Fax: (212) 963-4260, Email: [email protected], <http://www.un.org/esa/sustdev/csd.htm>

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