Skip to main content

Shelly, Adrienne 1966–2006

Shelly, Adrienne 1966–2006

PERSONAL

Original name, Adrienne Levine; born June 24, 1966 (some sources cite June 30), in Queens, New York; murdered, November 1, 2006, in New York, NY. Actress, director, and writer. Shelly was a fixture in the independent film scene, working first as an actress then moving on to writing and directing. Her first film appearances were in 1990 in the independent films The Unbelievable Truth and Trust, both directed by independent filmmaker Hal Hartley. Shelly also worked in theatre with New York's Workhorse Theatre. She appeared in such films as Big Girls Don't Cry … They Get Even, Sleeping with Strangers, and Dead Dog. Shelly also dabbled in television, guest starring in episodes of Homicide: Life on the Street, Oz, and Law & Order. Her first writing and directing credit was for the short film Urban Legend in 1994. In 1997 she wrote, directed, and appeared in Sudden Manhattan, a comedy. Two years later she wrote, directed, and appeared in another comedy, I'll Take You There. Shelly's final film was Waitress, which she also wrote and directed. It was released posthumously in 2007.

PERIODICALS

New York Times, November 4, 2006.

Playbill, November 3, 2006.

Variety, November 13, 2006.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Shelly, Adrienne 1966–2006." Contemporary Theatre, Film and Television. . Encyclopedia.com. 15 Nov. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Shelly, Adrienne 1966–2006." Contemporary Theatre, Film and Television. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 15, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/education/news-wires-white-papers-and-books/shelly-adrienne-1966-2006

"Shelly, Adrienne 1966–2006." Contemporary Theatre, Film and Television. . Retrieved November 15, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/education/news-wires-white-papers-and-books/shelly-adrienne-1966-2006

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.