Roos, Fred 1934–

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ROOS, Fred 1934–

PERSONAL

Full name, Frederick Ried Roos; born May 23, 1934, in Santa Monica, CA; son of Victor Otto and Florence Mary (maiden name, Stout) Roos. Education: University of California, Los Angeles, B.A., 1956.

Addresses: Office—2980 Beverly Glen Circle, Los Angeles, CA 90077.

Career: Producer. FR Productions, Los Angeles, CA, producer. Worked as a story editor for various companies, including Robert Lippert Productions, 1960–70; film producer, beginning 1964; Zoetrope studios, San Francisco, CA, producer; MCA, Los Angeles, CA, agent; also worked as casting director. Military service: U.S. Army, director of documentary films for Armed Forces Radio and Television Network, 1957–59.

Awards, Honors: Golden Palm (with others), Cannes Film Festival, and Academy Award nomination, best picture, 1974, both for The Conversation; Academy Award (with others), best picture, 1974, for The Godfather, Part II; Golden Palm (with others), best picture, Cannes Film Festival, Academy Award nomination (with others), best picture, and Film Award nomination, best picture, British Academy of Film and Television Arts, 1979, all for Apocalypse Now; Lifetime Achievement Award, Casting Society of America, 1988; Emmy Award nomination (with others), outstanding informational special, 1992, for Hearts of Darkness: A Filmmaker's Apocalypse.

CREDITS

Film Producer:

Back Door to Hell, Twentieth Century–Fox, 1964.

Flight to Fury (also known as Cordillera), Twentieth Century–Fox, 1966.

(With Francis Ford Coppola) The Conversation, Paramount, 1974.

(With Coppola and Gray Frederickson) Mario Puzo's The Godfather, Part II, Paramount, 1974.

(With Coppola, Frederickson, and Tom Sternberg) Apocalypse Now, United Artists, 1979.

(With Sternberg) The Black Stallion, United Artists, 1979.

(With Ronald Colby and Don Guest) Hammett, Warner Bros., 1982.

(With Frederickson and Armyan Bernstein) One from the Heart, Columbia, 1982.

(With Sternberg and Doug Claybourne) The Black Stallion Returns, Metro–Goldwyn–Mayer/United Artists, 1983.

(With Frederickson) The Outsiders, Warner Bros., 1983.

(With Claybourne) Rumble Fish, Universal, 1983.

(With Robert Evans and Silvio Tabet) The Cotton Club, Orion, 1984.

One Magic Christmas, Buena Vista, 1985.

Seven Minutes in Heaven (also known as Deslices de joventud), Warner Bros., 1986.

(With Barbet Schroeder and Tom Luddy) Barfly, Cannon, 1987.

(With Fred Fuchs) Tucker: The Man and His Dreams, Paramount, 1988.

(With Fuchs) "Life without Zoe," New York Stories, Buena Vista, 1989.

(With Frederickson, Coppola, and Charles Mulvehill) Mario Puzo's The Godfather, Part III, Paramount, 1990.

(With Luddy and Erwin Provoost) Wait until Spring,Bandini (also known as Bandini, Le ragioni del cuore, Aspetta primavera Bandini, and John Fante's Wait until Spring, Bandini), Warner Home Video, 1991.

(With Fuchs and Luddy) The Secret Garden, Warner Bros., 1993.

(With Rick McCallum) Radioland Murders, Universal, 1994.

Town and Country, 1999.

(With others) The Virgin Suicides (also known as Sofia Coppola's the Virgin Suicides), 2000.

The Young Black Stallion, Buena Vista, 2003.

Film Executive Producer:

The Escape Artist, Warner Bros., 1981.

(With Stan Weston, Jay Emmett, and David Valdes), Gardens of Stone, TriStar, 1987.

Lost in Translation, Focus Features, 2003.

Television Work; Series:

Executive producer, The Outsiders, Fox, 1990.

Television Work; Movies:

Producer, Montana, TNT, 1990.

Television Work; Specials:

Executive producer, Hearts of Darkness: A Filmmaker's Apocalypse, Showtime, 1991.

Television Appearances; Specials:

The 47th Annual Academy Awards, 1975.

The Godfather Family: A Look Inside, HBO, 1990.

Hearts of Darkness: A Filmmaker's Apocalypse, Showtime, 1991.

The Making of "American Graffiti," 1998.

Interviewee, Intimate Portrait: Teri Garr, Lifetime, 2000.

Interviewee, Andy Garcia: Latin Rhythms & America Dreams, Arts and Entertainment, 2001.

Television Appearances; Episodic:

American Cinema, PBS, 1995.

ADAPTATIONS

The film Flight to Fury (also known as Cordillera) was adapted from a story by Roos and released by Twentieth Century–Fox in 1966.

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Roos, Fred 1934–

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