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Foch, Nina 1924–

Foch, Nina 1924–

PERSONAL

Full name, Nina Consuelo Maud Fock; born April 20, 1924, in Leyden, Netherlands; daughter of Dirk (a musical conductor) and Consuelo (an actress and singer; maiden name, Flowerton) Fock; married James Lipton (an actor, writer, and producer), June 6, 1954 (divorced, 1959); married Dennis de Brito (some sources cite surname as Brite), November 27, 1959 (divorced, 1963); married Michael Dewell, October 31, 1967 (divorced, 1993); children: (second marriage) Dirk. Education: Attended Columbia University and Parsons School of Art; trained for the stage at American Academy of Dramatic Arts; studied acting with Stella Adler, Lee Strasberg, Harold Clurman, and David Alexander. Avocational Interests: Painting, cooking, needlepoint.

Addresses: AgentWilliam Morris Agency, 151 El Camino Dr., Beverly Hills, CA 90212.

Career: Actress, director, acting coach, and teacher. Los Angeles Theatre Group, Los Angeles, founder, 1960–65; National Repertory Theatre, Washington, DC, member of board of directors, 1967–75; Ford's Theatre, Washington, DC, associate producer of inaugural night reopening, 1968; Nina Foch Studio, Hollywood, CA, founder and teacher, 1973–; American Film Institute, member of board of governors; also performed as concert pianist. University of Southern California, Los Angeles, adjunct professor, 1965–66, 1978–80, 1986–87; American Film Institute, faculty member at Center of Advanced Film Studies, 1971–74, senior faculty, 1974–77; artist in residence at University of North Carolina, 1965–66, Ohio State University, 1966, and California Institute of Technology, 1969.

Member: Actors' Equity Association, American Federation of Television and Radio Artists, Screen Actors Guild, Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, Academy of Television Arts and Sciences, (member of Hollywood board of governors, 1976–77), American Association of University Professors, Foreign Film Academy (member of executive committee), Actors Fund of America.

Awards, Honors: Film Daily Awards, 1949, 1953; National Board of Review Award, best supporting actress, Special Jury Prize (with others), Venice Film Festival, 1954, and Academy Award nomination, best supporting actress, 1955, all for Executive Suite; Emmy Award nomination, best supporting actress in a drama series, 1980, for "Hollywood," Lou Grant; received star on Hollywood Walk of Fame.

CREDITS

Film Appearances:

Jan Colburn, Wagon Wheels West, 1943.

Alice Blake, Nine Girls, Columbia, 1944.

Niki Saunders, Return of the Vampire, 1944.

Princess Celeste LaTour, Cry of the Werewolf (also known as Daughter of the Werewolf), 1944.

Lois Garland, Shadows in the Night, 1944.

Frieda Brenner, Strange Affair, 1944.

Jeanne, She's a Sweetheart (also known as Hello Mom), 1944.

Tessie Legruda, She's a Soldier Too, 1944.

Constantia, A Song to Remember, Columbia, 1945.

Title role, My Name Is Julia Ross, Columbia, 1945.

Eileen Carr, Escape in the Fog, Columbia, 1945.

Ellen Monk, I Love a Mystery, 1945.

Anne Graham, Prison Ship, 1945.

Sally Brown, Boston Blackie's Rendezvous (also known as Blackie's Rendezvous), 1945.

(Uncredited) Harem girl, A Thousand and One Nights (also known as 1001 Nights), 1945.

Harriet Hobbs (some sources cite Hobson), Johnny O'Clock, 1947.

Susie Pearson, The Guilt of Janet Ames, 1947.

Betty, The Dark Past, 1948.

Glenda Chapman, Johnny Allegro (also known as Hounded), 1949.

Judith Warren, The Undercover Man (also known as Chicago Story), 1949.

Milo Roberts, An American in Paris, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 1951.

Linda Kovacs, St. Benny the Dip (also known as Escape if You Can), 1951.

Marie Antoinette, Scaramouche, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 1952.

Joyce Laramie, Young Man with Ideas (also known as Young Man in a Hurry), 1952.

Elena Cantu, Sombrero, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 1953.

Mercedes Bellway, Fast Company, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 1953.

Erica Martin, Executive Suite, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 1954.

Maggie Flannery, Four Guns to the Border (also known as Shadow Valley), Universal, 1954.

Ellen Miles/Ellen Borden, Illegal, Warner Bros., 1955.

Gretchen Brendan, You're Never Too Young, Paramount, 1955.

Lieutenant McCoy, Three Brave Men, Twentieth Century-Fox, 1957.

Bithiah, The Ten Commandments, Paramount, 1957.

Helena Glabrus, Spartacus (also known as Spartacus: Rebel against Rome), Universal, 1960.

Maude Kennard, Cash McCall, Warner Bros., 1960.

Mrs. Wallman, Such Good Friends, Paramount, 1971.

Miss Evans, Mahogany, Paramount, 1975.

Mrs. Calley, Jennifer (also known as Jennifer the Snake Goddess), 1978.

Literary party guest, Rich and Famous, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 1981.

Real estate agent, Nomads, Atlantic Releasing, 1986.

Hazel Laidlaw, Dixie Lanes (also known as Relative Secrets), Miramax, 1988.

Marge, Skin Deep, 1989.

Mrs. McEvoy, Sliver (also known as Sliver—Gier der augen), Paramount, 1993.

Brandon's mother, It's My Party, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 1996.

Sophia Monroe, 'Til There Was You, Paramount, 1997.

Alice Baring, Hush, TriStar, 1998.

Betsy Collander, Pumpkin, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer/United Artists, 2002.

Grandma Halley, How to Deal, New Line Cinema, 2003.

Film Work:

Associate director, The Diary of Anne Frank, Twentieth Century-Fox, 1959.

Television Appearances; Movies:

Carol Flemming, Prescription: Murder (also known as Columbo: Prescription Murder), 1968.

Bibi Crosby, Gidget Grows Up, 1969.

Goody Rickby, "The Scarecrow," Hollywood Television Theatre, 1972.

Amelia Craig, Female Artillery, 1972.

Reverend Le Veyne, The Great Houdini (also known as The Great Houdinis), 1976.

Aunt Lavinia Culp, "Child of Glass," Disneyland (also known as Disney's Wonderful World, The Disney Sunday Movie, The Magical World of Disney, Walt Disney, Walt Disney Presents, Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color, and The Wonderful World of Disney), 1978.

Dr. Adela Teba, Ebony, Ivory and Jade, 1980.

Samantha's mother, Outback Bound, CBS, 1988.

Mrs. Venible, In the Arms of a Killer, NBC, 1992.

Miss Beasley, Morning Glory, 1993.

Burak, Alien Nation: Dark Horizon, Fox, 1994.

Peg Miller, Family Blessings (also known as LaVyrle Spencer's "Family Blessings"), CBS, 1999.

Sylvia Saxon, Shadow of Doubt (also known as Reasonable Doubt), Reasonable Doubt Productions, Cinemax, 1999.

Mrs. Holmes, Back When We Were Grownups, CBS, 2004.

Television Appearances; Series:

Two Girls Named Smith, 1951.

Panelist, Q.E.D., ABC, 1951.

Panelist, It's News to Me, CBS, 1954.

Moderator, Let's Take Sides, 1957–59.

Mrs. Pettigar, Salty, 1974.

Madeline, a recurring role, Bull, TNT, 2000.

Television Appearances; Miniseries:

Comtesse de Chambrun, War and Remembrance, ABC, 1989.

Ellen Scott, The Sands of Time (also known as Sidney Sheldon's "The Sands of Time"), CBS, 1992.

Frances "Frannie" Halcyon, Tales of the City (also known as Armistead Maupin's "Tales of the City"), PBS, 1993.

Television Appearances; Specials:

The 27th Annual Academy Awards, NBC, 1955.

Ceil, Oh! Baby, Baby, Baby …, 1974.

Gardy Farraday, Pottsville, 1980.

Hannah Kingsley, Chameleon, CBS, 1986.

Charlton Heston: For All Seasons, Arts and Entertainment, 1995.

Universal Horror, TCM, 1998.

Gene Kelly: Anatomy of a Dancer, 2002.

"John Ritter: In Good Company," Biography, Arts and Entertainment, 2002.

Hollywood Home Movies, Arts and Entertainment, 2004.

Eileen Carr (in archive footage), Budd Boetticiher: A Man Can Do That, TCM, 2005.

Television Appearances; Episodic:

"Three Cornered Moon," The Philco Television Playhouse (also known as Arena Theatre, The Philco-Goodyear Television Playhouse, and Repertory Theatre), 1949.

"Half an Hour," The Chevrolet Tele-Theatre (also known as The Broadway Playhouse and Chevrolet Television Theatre), 1949.

"Temporarily Purple," The Chevrolet Tele-Theatre (also known as The Broadway Playhouse and Chevrolet Television Theatre), 1949.

"The Creeper," Suspense, 1949.

"Morning Boat to Africa," Suspense, 1950.

"One and One's a Lonesome," Suspense, 1950.

"Only This Night," Armstrong Circle Theatre, 1950.

Flo, "Mine to Have," Lux Video Theatre (also known as Summer Video Theatre), CBS, 1951.

Jessica, "Dames Are Poison," Lux Video Theatre (also known as Summer Video Theatre), CBS, 1951.

"The House of Dust," Lights Out, 1951.

"The Case of the Calico Dog," Nash Airflyte Theatre (also known as Airflyte Theatre), 1951.

"Bride from Broadway," Faith Baldwin Romance Theatre (also known as Faith Baldwin Playhouse and Faith Baldwin Theatre), 1951.

"Betrayal," Cameo Theatre, 1951.

"In Hiding," Somerset Maugham TV Theatre (also known as Teller of Tales), 1951.

"Icebound," Pulitzer Prize Playhouse, 1951.

"The Buccaneer," Pulitzer Prize Playhouse, 1951.

"The Skin of Our Teeth," Pulitzer Prize Playhouse, 1951.

Your Show of Shows (also known as Sid Caesar's Show of Shows), 1951, 1952, 1953.

"The Jungle," Pulitzer Prize Playhouse, 1952.

Terry, "The Magnolia Touch," Lux Video Theatre (also known as Summer Video Theatre), CBS, 1952.

Jane Conway, "The Key," Lux Video Theatre (also known as Summer Video Theatre), CBS, 1952.

"Double By-Line," The Gulf Playhouse, 1952.

"Blood Relation," Lights Out, 1952.

"World So Wide," Schlitz Playhouse of Stars (also known as Herald Playhouse, The Playhouse, and Schlitz Playhouse), 1952.

"Bound Together," Tales of Tomorrow, 1952.

Panelist, That Reminds Me, NBC, 1952.

"The Kill," Studio One (also known as Studio One in Hollywood, Studio One Summer Theatre, Summer Theatre, Westinghouse Studio One, and Westinghouse Summer Theatre), CBS, 1952.

"Trapped," General Electric Theatre (also known as G.E. Theatre), 1953.

"All My Love," Studio One (also known as Studio One in Hollywood, Studio One Summer Theatre, Summer Theatre, Westinghouse Studio One, and Westinghouse Summer Theatre), CBS, 1953.

"Legal Affair," Hollywood Opening Night, 1953.

"The Fury of Senorita Gomez," Suspense, 1953.

"Hand Me Down," Danger, CBS, 1953.

"Ski Story," Armstrong Circle Theatre, 1953.

"Room 203," The Philip Morris Playhouse (also known as P.M. Playhouse), CBS, 1953.

"See No Evil," Danger, CBS, 1954.

"Main Feature: Death," Suspense, 1954.

"The Rise of Carthage," The U.S. Steel Hour (also known as The United States Steel Hour), CBS, 1954.

Kay Thorndyke, "State of the Union," Producers' Showcase, NBC, 1954.

Barbara, "A Guest at the Embassy," Studio One (also known as Studio One in Hollywood, Studio One Summer Theatre, Summer Theatre, Westinghouse Studio One, and Westinghouse Summer Theatre), CBS, 1954.

Mrs. Graff, "Reunion," Letter to Loretta (also known as The Loretta Young Show and The Loretta Young Theatre), 1955.

Melissa Turner, "Miss Turner's Decision," Studio One (also known as Studio One in Hollywood, Studio One Summer Theatre, Summer Theatre, Westinghouse Studio One, and Westinghouse Summer Theatre), CBS, 1955.

"Roberta," The Colgate Comedy Hour (also known as Colgate Summer Comedy Hour, Colgate Variety Hour, and Michael Todd Revue), 1955.

Mrs. Scott, "The Answer," Playwrights '56 (also known as The Playwright Hour), 1955.

Emily Rone, "Night of Execution," Climax! (also known as Climax Mystery Theatre), 1955.

Belle Thurmond, "The Undiscovered Country," Playwrights '56 (also known as The Playwright Hour), 1956.

Joyce Newell, "Manhattan Duet," Studio One (also known as Studio One in Hollywood, Studio One Summer Theatre, Summer Theatre, Westinghouse Studio One, and Westinghouse Summer Theatre), CBS, 1956.

Fran Dundee, "The Drop of a Hat," Studio One (also known as Studio One in Hollywood, Studio One Summer Theatre, Summer Theatre, Westinghouse Studio One, and Westinghouse Summer Theatre), CBS, 1956.

The Steve Allen Show, CBS, 1956.

Joan Byrnes, "Yacht on the High Sea," The 20th Century-Fox Hour (also known as Fox Hour of Stars), 1956.

Susan Harland, "One Life," The 20th Century-Fox Hour (also known as Fox Hour of Stars), 1956.

Libby Hanneman, "Heritage of Anger," Playhouse 90, CBS, 1956.

Mrs. Kelly, "The Playroom," Playhouse 90, CBS, 1957.

Brita, "A Double Life," The Alcoa Hour, 1957.

Clara Beauchamp, "The Clara Beauchamp Story," Wagon Train (also known as Major Adams, Trail Master), 1957.

"A Night of Rain," Kraft Television Theatre (also known as Kraft Mystery Theatre and Kraft Theatre), 1957.

"Nothing Personal," Kraft Television Theatre (also known as Kraft Mystery Theatre and Kraft Theatre), 1957.

Caroline Emmet, "Deadly Climate," Climax! (also known as Climax Mystery Theatre), 1957.

Ellen Townsend, "God Is My Judge," General Electric Theatre (also known as G.E. Theatre), 1958.

Wanda Newton, "Free Weekend," Playhouse 90, CBS, 1958.

Mrs. Claire Holden, "Ticket to Tangier," Pursuit, 1958.

Beatrice, "Much Ado about Nothing: Parts 1 & 2," Matinee Theatre, 1958.

Belinda Cattson, "The Laughing Willow," Studio One (also known as Studio One in Hollywood, Studio One Summer Theatre, Summer Theatre, Westinghouse Studio One, and Westinghouse Summer Theatre), CBS, 1958.

"Image of Fear," Studio One (also known as Studio One in Hollywood, Studio One Summer Theatre, Summer Theatre, Westinghouse Studio One, and Westinghouse Summer Theatre), CBS, 1958.

Grace Barlow, "Whisper of Evil," The U.S. Steel Hour (also known as The United States Steel Hour), CBS, 1959.

Madrina Wilcox, "Incident of the Judas Trap," Rawhide, 1959.

Title role, "The Case of Julia Walton," The U.S. Steel Hour (also known as The United States Steel Hour), CBS, 1959.

Joan Rogers, "The Red Dress," Letter to Loretta (also known as The Loretta Young Show and The Loretta Young Theatre), 1959.

"Lady Frankenstein," The Thin Man, 1959.

"A Time to Decide," The U.S. Steel Hour (also known as The United States Steel Hour), CBS, 1960.

Andromache, "Tiger at the Gates," Play of the Week, 1960.

Maude Hamilton, "The Fingers of Henri Tourelle," Naked City, ABC, 1961.

Lillian Aldrich, "A Bridge across Five Days," Route 66, CBS, 1961.

Rose Greenbow, "The Rebellious Rose," The Americans, 1961.

Merwitch, "The Little Mermaid," Shirley Temple's Storybook (also known as The Shirley Temple Show), 1961.

Anne Elliot, "State of Shock," Checkmate, 1961.

Mrs. Davenham, "Hercule Poirot," General Electric Theatre (also known as G.E. Theatre), 1962.

Kitty Lamson, "The Sweetly Smiling Face of Truth," Naked City, ABC, 1962.

Autumn Ely, "Across Walnuts and Wine," Route 66, CBS, 1962.

Kitty Blaine, "Cry to Heaven," Bus Stop, syndicated, 1962.

Ginny Thatcher, "Seeds of April," The Dick Powell Show (also known as The Dick Powell Theatre), 1962.

Frances Graham, "Vengeance is the Spur," The Virginian (also known as The Men from Shiloh), 1963.

Eva Fraser, "The Borderland," The Outer Limits, syndicated, 1963.

Nora Hildon, "Of Rusted Cannons and Fallen Sparrows," Sam Benedict, 1963.

Ellen Burnham, "My Name Is Martin Burnham," Arrest and Trial, ABC, 1963.

Sarah Middleton, "The End of the World, Baby," Kraft Suspense Theatre, CBS, 1963.

Angelica Cellini, "Leaves in the Wind," The Greatest Show on Earth, 1963.

Guest panelist, "Nina Foch vs. Michael Landon," Pantomime Quiz, 1963.

Samantha, "Where There's a Will, There's a Way: Parts 1 & 2," Route 66, CBS, 1964.

Anjanette Delacroix, "Who Killed 1/2 of Glory Lee?," Burke's Law (also known as Amos Burke, Secret Agent), ABC, 1964.

Maggie, "Maggie, Queen of the Jungle," Mr. Broadway, CBS, 1964.

The mother, "The Casket," Combat!, 1965.

Georgia Pettigrew, "My Name Is Lisa, and I Am Lost," Dr. Kildare, 1965.

Marlee Cole, "Marlee," A Man Called Shenandoah, 1966.

Carlotta, "Carlotta, Come Home," The Long, Hot Summer, 1966.

Dee, "And Baby Makes Five," Bob Hope Presents the Chrysler Theatre (also known as The Chrysler Theatre and Universal Star Time), 1966.

Vera Stannard, "A Time to Love," Bob Hope Presents the Chrysler Theatre (also known as The Chrysler Theatre and Universal Star Time), 1967.

Clarissa, "Clarissa," Bonanza (also known as Ponderosa), 1967.

Gerta, "Child Out of Time," I Spy, 1967.

Angela Morgan, "Collector's Edition," The Name of the Game, 1968.

Virginia Westphal, "Love," The Mod Squad, 1968.

Duchess Sophia, "The Night of the Cossacks," The Wild, Wild West, 1969.

Agatha Corey, "Coreyville," Gunsmoke (also known as Gun Law and Marshal Dillon), 1969.

Diana Masterson, "Beautiful People," To Rome with Love, 1970.

Terry Simms, "The Dollar," The F.B.I., 1970.

Police Sergeant F. J. Cameron, "Murder Arena, Part 2: Walk in the Dark," McCloud, 1970.

Mrs. Fredericks, "I Love You, Billy Baker: Parts 1 & 2," The Name of the Game, 1970.

Frances Nelson, "That Script," That Girl, 1971.

"Marathon," Storefront Lawyers (also known as Men at Law), 1971.

Guest, The Virginia Graham Show, 1972.

Marion Scott, "Little Girl Blue," Hawaii Five-0 (also known as McGarrett), CBS, 1973.

Sylvia Mitchell, "A Lesson in Loving," Owen Marshall: Counselor at Law, 1973.

Eleanor DeRoche, "Divorce—Murderer's Style," Barnaby Jones, 1973.

"Don't Kill My Child," The Mod Squad, 1973.

Irene Denore, "The Stainless Steel Lady," The Magician, 1974.

Madame Trevi, "The Trevi Collection," Kolchak: The Night Stalker (also known as The Night Stalker), 1975.

Nellie, "A Little Bit like Murder," Wide World of Mystery, 1975.

Myra Westmore, "The Stalking Horse," Barnaby Jones, 1976.

Marietta Galway, "Phillip's Game," McMillan and Wife (also known as McMillan), 1977.

Mrs. Polk, "Hollywood," Lou Grant, CBS, 1979.

Julie Luden, "Play Your Hunch," Trapper John, M.D., 1984.

Lawyer Camille Carlton, "Smoke Gets in Your Thighs," L.A. Law, NBC, 1990.

Gloria Morrell, "Acapulco Holiday," Hunter, 1990.

"A Midsummer Night's Reality," Room for Romance, 1990.

Charlotte Lacey, Dear John, NBC, 1990–91.

Katie Emhardt, "Tainted Lady," Murder, She Wrote, CBS, 1991.

Carmela Kaufman, "Lifelines: Parts 1 & 2," Reasonable Doubts, NBC, 1992.

Rebecca Kinkaid, "Death in Hawaii," Murder, She Wrote, CBS, 1994.

Beatrice, "Death & Violins," Dharma & Greg, ABC, 1999.

Catherine DuChamp, "Dial 'N' for Murder," Just Shoot Me, NBC, 2000.

Mrs. Vanessa Mallard, "The Meat Puzzle," Navy NCIS: Naval Criminal Investigative Service (also known as NCIS and NCIS: Naval Criminal Investigative Service), CBS, 2005.

Mrs. Victoria Mallard, "Untouchable," Navy NCIS: Naval Criminal Investigative Service (also known as NCIS and NCIS: Naval Criminal Investigative Service), CBS, 2006.

Also appeared in presentations of Dick Cavett, The Dinah Shore Show, The Merv Griffin Show, Mike Hammer, The Today Show, and The Tonight Show.

Television Appearances; Other:

Vera Claythorne, Ten Little Indians, 1959.

Mrs. Danvers, Rebecca, 1962.

Dr. Juliana Moorehouse, Shadow Chasers (pilot), 1985.

Television Director; Movies:

Family Blessings (also known as LaVyrle Spencer's "Family Blessings"), CBS, 1999.

Stage Appearances:

(Broadway debut) Mary McKinley, John Loves Mary, Booth Theatre, 1947, then Music Box Theatre, 1947–48.

Countess Olivia, Twelfth Night, Empire Theatre, New York City, 1949.

Congressional Baby, Albany, NY, 1950.

Dynamene, A Phoenix Too Frequent (double-bill with Freight), Fulton Theatre, New York City, 1950.

The Philadelphia Story, summer stock production, 1950.

Light Up the Sky, summer stock production, 1950.

Cordelia, King Lear, National Theatre, New York City, 1950–51.

Isabella, Measure for Measure, American Shakespeare Festival, Stratford, CT, 1956, then Phoenix Theatre, New York City, 1957.

Katharine, The Taming of the Shrew, American Shakespeare Festival, 1956, then Phoenix Theatre, 1957.

Jane, A Second String, Eugene O'Neill Theatre, New York City, 1960.

Masha, The Three Sisters, University of California Theatre, Los Angeles, 1960.

USA Revue, University of California Theatre, 1962.

Brecht on Brecht, University of California Theatre, 1965.

Freda Lawrence, "I Rise in Flames Cried the Phoenix," and Frances, "Windows," An Evening of Williams, Pinter and Schisgal, University of California Theatre, 1965.

The Seven Deadly Sins, San Francisco Ballet and Opera, San Francisco, CA, 1966.

The Wife, All Over, Seattle Repertory Theatre, Seattle, WA, 1972.

Madame Arkadina, The Seagull, Seattle Repertory Theatre, 1974.

Major Tours:

(Stage debut), Western Union, Please, U.S. cities, 1941.

Stage Director:

"Ways and Means," Tonight at 8:30, National Repertory Theatre, American National Theatre and Academy Theatre, New York City, and U.S. cities, 1966–67.

RECORDINGS

Videos:

100 Years of Horror: The Count and Company, 1996.

100 Years of Horror: The Double Demons, 1996.

100 Years of Horror: Scream Queens, 1996.

Taped Readings:

(With Earl Holliman and Denver Pyle) Program 3—If the Two of Them Are Dead, Hosted by Rod Serling, 1996.

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