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Wimmel, Carl Ludwig

Wimmel, Carl Ludwig (1786–1845). German architect. A pupil of Christian Friedrich Lange (1768–1833), Langhans, and Weinbrenner, he worked in Hamburg from 1814, becoming Director of the Building Department in 1841. His earliest buildings for the City included the Greek Doric Steintor and Millerntor (1818–19—both destroyed), and the arcuated General Hospital (1815–23—destroyed). For the Municipal Theatre (1826–7—destroyed) and the dignified terrace-houses at the Esplanade (1827–30) he chose a refined Classicism, but his best building, the Johanneum (two schools and a library grouped around a court, of 1837–40—destroyed), was in the rusticated Florentine round-arched style made fashionable by Gärtner and von Klenze in Munich. He chose a Neo-Cinquecento style for the Exchange (1837–41), designed, like the Johanneum, in collaboration with Franz Gustav Joachim Forsmann (1795–1878), whose finest work on his own account, the Jenisch House at Flottbeck, near Hamburg (1828–34), survives, a taut Grecian villa strongly influenced by the work of Schinkel.

Bibliography

Grundmann (1957);
Hannmann (1975);
W&M (1987)

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