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Ribaldry

561. Ribaldry

  1. Decameron, The Boccaccios bawdy panorama of medieval Italian life. [Ital. Lit.: Bishop, 314315, 380]
  2. Droll Tales Balzacs Rabelaisian stories, told in racy medieval style and frequently gross. [Fr. Lit.: Contes Drolatiques in Benét, 222]
  3. Fescennia Etrurian town noted for jesting and scurrilous verse (Fescennine verse). [Rom. Hist.: EB, TV: 112]
  4. Gargantua and Pantagruel Rabelaiss farcical and obscene 16th-century novel. [Fr. Lit.: Magill I, 298]
  5. Golden Ass, The tale of Lucius and his asininity, with a number of bawdy episodes. [Rom. Lit.: Apuleius Metamorphoses or The Golden Ass in Magill I, 309]
  6. Goliards scholar-poets interested mainly in earthly delights. [Medieval Hist.: Bishop, 292293]
  7. Iambe girl who amused Demeter with bawdy stories. [Gk. Myth.: Howe, 136]
  8. LaFontaine, The Tales of ribald stories in verse, adapted from Boccaccio and others. [Fr. Lit.: Contes en Vers in Benét, 222]
  9. Millers Tale, The lusty story told by the drunken Miller. [Br. Lit.: Canterbury Tales in Magill II, 131]
  10. Reeves Tale, The Oswald the Reeve retaliates in kind to The Millers Tale. [Br. Lit.: Canterbury Tales in Benét, 919]

Ridicule (See MOCKERY .)

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