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Cleverly, Charles Peter

Cleverly, Charles Peter (1923–2002). English architect. Disgusted by the damage being inflicted on London by Corbusian and CIAM-inspired high-rise developments in the 1960s, he left London to practise in Suffolk. He created the North Quad of Pembroke College, Oxford (1956–64), from a disparate series of houses backing on to Beef Lane. He specialized in conserving churches and ancient houses, and collaborated with the National Trust, carrying out restoration work at Felbrigg Hall, Norfolk, the Rotunda at Ickworth, Suffolk, Thorington Hall, Stoke by Nayland, Suffolk, Flatford Mill, Essex, Bourne Mill, Essex, and Paycocke's, Coggeshall, Essex, among other places. Some 85 medieval churches were in his care, and he campaigned for the sensitive conversion of traditional East Anglian barns into houses. His great-grandfather, Charles St George Cleverly (1819–97) was responsible for the original layout of Hong Kong, and his grandfather Professor Frederick Moore Simpson (1855–1928) was the author of A History of Architectural Development (1905–11).

Bibliography

The Times (8 July 2002), 34

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