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Barnsley, Sidney Howard

Barnsley, Sidney Howard (1865–1926). Birmingham-born English architect, educated at the Royal Academy Schools, articled to R. Norman Shaw, he travelled in Greece with Robert Schultz Weir, with whom he collaborated on Byzantine Architecture in Greece (1901). His finest work is the Church of St Sophia, Lower Kingswood, Surrey (1891), in a free Byzantine style, which includes several Antique fragments. Barnsley joined his brother ( E. A. Barnsley) and Gimson when they moved to the Cotswolds, and settled at Sapperton where Sidney designed his own cottage, Beechanger. He also designed a number of buildings in an Arts-and-Crafts vernacular style. He superintended the completion of works at Bedales School, near Petersfield, Hants., after Gimson's death, and when his brother died he worked on Rodmarton Manor, near Cirencester, Glos. He carried out tactful additions to Lodge Farm and Gyde Almshouses, Painswick, Glos. Works on Bedales were continued after his death by his son, Edward Barnsley.

Bibliography

Carruthers (1992);
A. S. Gray (1985)

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