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boulder (in geology)

boulder, large rock fragment formed by detachment from its parent consolidated rock by weathering and erosion. In engineering and geology, especially in the United States, the term is applied to loose rocks having specific sizes according to various systems of classification, i.e. the Wentworth scale (for C. K. Wentworth, American geologist), where a boulder has one linear dimension of at least 10.1 in. (25.4 cm). Boulders transported by glacial ice are usually referred to as glacial erratics; glacial boulder fields, or felsenmeer, containing large blocks of angular rock broken from intense frost action are evidence that the region has experienced glacial action in the past. See drift; moraine.

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boulder

boul·der / ˈbōldər/ (also bowl·der) • n. a large rock, typically one that has been worn smooth by erosion. DERIVATIVES: boul·der·y adj.

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boulder

boulder See PARTICLE SIZE.

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Boulder

Boulder

Boulder: Introduction
Boulder: Geography and Climate
Boulder: History
Boulder: Population Profile
Boulder: Municipal Government
Boulder: Economy
Boulder: Education and Research
Boulder: Health Care
Boulder: Recreation
Boulder: Convention Facilities
Boulder: Transportation
Boulder: Communications

The City in Brief

Founded: 1859 (incorporated 1871)

Head Officials: Mayor Mark Ruzzin (since 2001); City Manager Frank Bruno (since 2003)

City Population

1980: 76,685

1990: 85,127

2000: 94,673

2003 estimate: 93,051

Percent change, 19902000: 11.2%

U.S. rank in 1980: 250th

U.S. rank in 1990: 257th

U.S. rank in 2000: 283th (State rank: 9th)

Metropolitan Area Population (PMSA)

1980: 189,625

1990: 225,339

2000: 291,288

Percent change, 19902000: 29.3%

U.S. rank in 1980: 21st (CMSA)

U.S. rank in 1990: 22nd (CMSA)

U.S. rank in 2000: 19th (CMSA)

Area: 25.37 square miles (2002)

Elevation: 5,340 feet above sea level

Average Annual Temperature: 51.8° F

Average Annual Precipitation: 102.13 inches total (83.1 inches of snow)

Major Economic Sectors: Services, trade, manufacturing, government

Unemployment Rate: 4.8% (January 2005)

Per Capita Income: $27,262 (1999)

2002 FBI Crime Index Total: 3,743

Major Colleges and Universities: University of Colorado at Boulder, Naropa University, Front Range Community College

Daily Newspaper: Daily Camera

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boulder

boulderdodder, fodder, plodder, prodder •Isolde, solder •absconder, anaconda, Fonda, Golconda, Honda, nonda, ponder, responder, squander, Wanda, wander, yonder •hot-rodder •awarder, boarder, border, defrauder, hoarder, Korda, marauder, order, recorder, sordor, warder •alder, Balder, Calder •launder, maunder •sailboarder • skateboarder •keyboarder • snowboarder •camcorder • video recorder •chowder, Gouda, howdah, Lauda, powder •bounder, compounder, expounder, flounder, founder, grounder, impounder, pounder, propounder, rounder, sounder •gunpowder •Clodagh, coda, coder, exploder, loader, Oder, odour (US odor), pagoda, Rhoda, Sargodha, Schroder, soda, vocoder •beholder, boulder, folder, holder, moulder (US molder), polder, scolder, shoulder, smoulder (US smolder), upholder, withholder •cardholder • shareholder •stakeholder •freeholder, keyholder •leaseholder • copyholder •policyholder • stockholder •smallholder, stallholder •householder • freeloader •avoider, embroider •joinder • Schadenfreude

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boulder

boulder XIII. First as bulder ston, of Scand. orig.; Cf. Sw. dial. bullersten, buldurstajn; perh. orig. a stone that causes a rumbling noise in water (Cf. Sw. buller sb., bullra vb. rumble).

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