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longitude

longitude (lŏn´jĬtōōd´), angular distance on the earth's surface measured along any latitude line such as the equator east or west of the prime meridian. A meridian of longitude is an imaginary line on the earth's surface from pole to pole; two opposite meridians form a great circle dividing the earth into two hemispheres. By international agreement, the meridian passing through the original site of the Royal Greenwich Observatory at Greenwich, England, is designated the prime meridian, and all points along it are at 0° longitude. All other points on the earth have longitudes ranging from 0° to 180°E or from 0° to 180°W. Except where it is changed to account for populated areas, the international date line lies along the 180° meridian. Meridians of longitude and parallels of latitude together form a grid by which any position on the earth's surface can be specified. The term longitude is also used in various celestial coordinate systems (see ecliptic coordinate system).

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longitudinal

lon·gi·tu·di·nal / ˌlänjəˈt(y)oōdn-əl; ˌlôn-; -ˈt(y)oōdnəl/ • adj. 1. running lengthwise rather than across: longitudinal muscles longitudinal stripes longitudinal extent. ∎  (of research or data) involving information about an individual or group gathered over a long period of time. 2. of or relating to longitude; measured from east to west: longitudinal positions. DERIVATIVES: lon·gi·tu·di·nal·ly adv.

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longitude

lon·gi·tude / ˈlänjiˌt(y)oōd; ˈlôn-/ • n. the angular distance of a place east or west of the meridian at Greenwich, England, or west of the standard meridian of a celestial object, usually expressed in degrees and minutes: at a longitude of 2° W | lines of longitude. ∎  Astron. see celestial longitude.

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longitude

longitude Angular measurement around the Earth, usually in degrees e or w of an imaginary ns line through the prime meridian. All ns lines are called either meridians or lines of longitude.

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longitude

longitude length (spec. east or west in geog. and astron.; see LATITUDE). XIV. — L. longitūdō, f. longus LONG1; see -TUDE.

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longitude

longitudeallude, brood, collude, conclude, crude, delude, dude, elude, étude, exclude, extrude, exude, feud, food, illude, include, intrude, Jude, lewd, mood, nude, obtrude, occlude, Oudh, preclude, protrude, prude, pseud, pultrude, rood, rude, seclude, shrewd, snood, transude, unglued, unsubdued, who'd, you'd •habitude •magnitude • seafood • wholefood •Quaalude • postlude • interlude •Ermintrude • Gertrude • unvalued •prelude • quietude • hebetude •longitude • amplitude •similitude, verisimilitude •solitude • plenitude • finitude •decrepitude • turpitude • pulchritude •crassitude, lassitude •solicitude, vicissitude •attitude, beatitude, gratitude, latitude, platitude •exactitude • sanctitude • aptitude •rectitude • ineptitude • promptitude •fortitude • multitude • certitude •servitude • consuetude

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longitudinal

longitudinalannal, channel, flannel, impanel, multichannel, panel •cracknel •grapnel, shrapnel •carnal •antennal, crenel, fennel, kennel •regnal •anal, decanal •adrenal, officinal, penal, renal, venal •signal, spignel •hymnal • cardinal • libidinal • ordinal •attitudinal, latitudinal, longitudinal •altitudinal •imaginal, paginal •marginal, submarginal •aboriginal • virginal • disciplinal •seminal •criminal, liminal, subliminal •abdominal, nominal, phenomenal, pronominal •noumenal •germinal, terminal •vaticinal, vicinal •sentinel • intestinal • Juvenaldoctrinal, final, semi-final, spinal, urinal, vaginal •quarterfinal •cantonal, O'Connell •cornel • nounal •atonal, Donal, hormonal, Monel, patronal, polytonal, tonal, zonal •motional •lagoonal, monsoonal, tribunal •communal •Chunnel, funnel, gunnel, gunwale, runnel, tunnel •autumnal • meridional •embryonal, Lionel •diagonal, heptagonal, hexagonal, octagonal, tetragonal •trigonal • orthogonal • occasional •divisional, provisional, visional •delusional, fusional, illusional •regional • original • coronal • arsenal •medicinal •impersonal, interpersonal, personal, transpersonal •irrational, national, passional, rational •factional, fractional, redactional, transactional •confessional, congressional, expressional, impressional, obsessional, processional, professional, progressional, recessional, secessional, sessional, successional •connectional, correctional, directional, interjectional, intersectional, sectional, unidirectional •ascensional, attentional, conventional, declensional, intentional, tensional, three-dimensional, two-dimensional •conceptional, exceptional, perceptional •durational, locational, oblational, relational, vocational •rotational •additional, positional, tuitional, volitional •fictional, jurisdictional •inscriptional • optional • proportional •devotional, emotional, notional, promotional •constitutional, evolutional, institutional, substitutional •constructional, fluxional, instructional •conjunctional, dysfunctional, functional, multifunctional •versional • seasonal •colonel, diurnal, eternal, external, fraternal, infernal, internal, journal, kernel, maternal, nocturnal, paternal, supernal, vernal

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