co-adaptation

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co-adaptation The development and maintenance of advantageous genetic traits, so that mutual relationships can persist (i.e. both parties evolve adaptations that increase the effectiveness of the relationship). Predator-prey and flower—pollinator relationships often exhibit examples of co-adaptation, which is an aspect of co-evolution. For example, the relationship between the ant Pseudomyrex ferruginea and the plant Acacia hindsii is obligatory and dependent on co-adaptations. The ant is active 24 hours a day (which is unusual for ants) and thereby provides continuous protection for the acacia. In a similar evolutionary gesture, the acacia bears leaves throughout the year (most related species lose their leaves), providing a continuous source of food for the ants.

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co-adaptation The development and maintenance of advantageous genetic traits, so that mutual relationships can persist (i.e. both parties evolve adaptations that increase the effectiveness of the relationship). Predator-prey and flower-pollinator relationships often exhibit examples of co-adaptation, which is an aspect of co-evolution. For example, the relationship between the ant Pseudomyrex ferruginea and the plant Acacia hindsii is obligatory and dependent on co-adaptations. The ant is active 24 hours a day (which is unusual for ants) and thereby provides continuous protection for the acacia. In a similar evolutionary gesture, the acacia bears leaves throughout the year (most related species lose their leaves), providing a continuous source of food for the ants.

views updated

co-adaptation The development and maintenance of advantageous genetic traits, so that mutual relationships can persist. Predator-prey and flower-pollinator relationships often exhibit examples of co-adaptation, which is an aspect of co-evolution.

views updated

co-adaptation Development and maintenance of advantageous genetic traits, so that mutual relationships can persist. Predator-prey, and flower-pollinator relationships often exhibit examples of co-adaptation, which is an aspect of co-evolution.