catalysis

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catalysis The acceleration of a chemical or biochemical reaction that is brought about by the action of a catalyst. The catalyst, which is not affected by the overall reaction, acts by either lowering the activation energy of the reaction through a reorientation of molecules in collision, or by facilitating an alternative mechanism that has a different activation energy. Enzymes are naturally occurring catalysts which are universally present in all living cells. Enzymes are generally much more efficient and more specific than other catalysts.

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catalysis The acceleration of a chemical or biochemical reaction that is brought about by the action of a catalyst. The catalyst, which is not affected by the overall reaction, acts by either lowering the activation energy of the reaction through a reorientation of molecules in collision, or by facilitating an alternative mechanism that has a different activation energy. Enzymes are naturally occurring catalysts which are universally present in all living cells. Enzymes are generally much more efficient and more specific than other catalysts.

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catalysis †dissolution XVII; (chem.) chemical action brought about by a substance that remains unchanged XIX. — modL. — Gr. katálusis, f. katalúein dissolve, f. CATA- 2 + lúein loosen.
Hence catalyse, catalytic XIX, catalyst XX; after analyse, etc.

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ca·tal·y·sis / kəˈtaləsis/ • n. Chem. & Biochem. the acceleration of a chemical reaction by a catalyst.

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catalysis A chemical term, literally meaning ‘breaking down’, and in digestive physiology referring specifically to the breaking down of ingested food by an animal's own digestive enzymes. Compare AUTOCATALYSIS.

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catalysis The process of changing the rate of a chemical reaction by use of a catalyst.