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Prelinger, Elizabeth

Prelinger, Elizabeth

PERSONAL:

Education: Harvard University, A.B., A.M., Ph.D.

ADDRESSES:

Office—Georgetown University, 102-e Walsh, 37th and O Streets N.W., Washington, DC 20057.

CAREER:

Art historian. Georgetown University, Washington, DC, assistant professor of fine arts, became Keyser Family Professor of Art History.

WRITINGS:

NONFICTION

Edvard Munch, Master Printmaker: An Examination the Artist's Work and Techniques Based on the Philip and Lynn Straus Collection, W.W. Norton (New York, NY), 1983.

Käthe Kollwitz, National Gallery of Art (Washington, DC), 1992.

(With Michael Parke-Taylor) The Symbolist Prints of Edvard Munch: The Vivian and David Campbell Collection, Yale University Press (New Haven, CT), 1996.

After the Scream: The Late Paintings of Edvard Munch, High Museum of Art (Atlanta, GA)/Yale University Press (New Haven, CT), 2001.

"TREASURES FROM THE SMITHSONIAN AMERICAN ART MUSEUM" SERIES

The Gilded Age, Watson-Guptill (New York, NY), Smithsonian Art Museum (Washington, DC), 2000.

American Impressionism, Watson-Guptill (New York, NY), Smithsonian Art Museum (Washington, DC), 2000.

Scenes of American Life, Watson-Guptill (New York, NY), Smithsonian Art Museum (Washington, DC), 2001.

Contributor to books, including The Nabis and the Parisian Avant-Garde, edited by Patricia Eckert Boyer, Rutgers University Press (New Brunswick, NJ), 1988.

SIDELIGHTS:

Art historian Elizabeth Prelinger is the author of a number of works about celebrated Norwegian printmaker and painter Edvard Munch, best known for his iconic 1893 work The Scream. Deemed "an attractive and thoughtful consideration of early prints" by Library Journal contributor Jack Perry Brown, The Symbolist Prints of Edvard Munch: The Vivian and David Campbell Collection discusses Munch's background as a graphic artist, describes his innovative printmaking techniques, and examines his Symbolist themes. The work contains fifty-eight reproductions of the artist's prints, including most of his major works. In After the Scream: The Late Paintings of Edvard Munch, Prelinger examines more than sixty of the artist's works completed in the latter part of his life, in which he adopted a looser, more vibrant painting style.

In Käthe Kollwitz, a catalogue that accompanied a 1992 exhibition of the German sculptor and printmaker's work, Prelinger offers "an interesting and much needed overview of the artist's graphic techniques," stated Burlington Magazine contributor Colin Rhodes. According to Carol Small, writing in the Woman's Art Journal, Prelinger "emphasizes Kollwitz's extraordinary inventiveness and technical achievements."

Prelinger has also published a number of works in the "Treasures from the Smithsonian American Art Museum" series. The Gilded Age presents works by Winslow Homer, Cecilia Beaux, John Singer Sargent, Thomas Eakins, Mary Cassatt, and other notable American artists. American Impressionism features paintings by American artists who were influenced by European Impressionism, including James McNeill Whistler and Maurice Prendergast. In Scenes of American Life, a "nicely illustrated" work, according to Library Journal critic Douglas F. Smith, Prelinger focuses on Depression-era paintings and murals.

BIOGRAPHICAL AND CRITICAL SOURCES:

PERIODICALS

Belles Lettres, winter, 1992, Nancy Derr, review of Käthe Kollwitz, pp. 4-5.

Burlington Magazine, April, 1993, Colin Rhodes, review of Käthe Kollwitz, pp. 284-285.

Choice, February, 1984, review of Edvard Munch, Master Printmaker: An Examination the Artist's Work and Techniques Based on the Philip and Lynn Straus Collection, p. 814; November, 1992, J.A. Day, review of Käthe Kollwitz, p. 456; June, 1997, J.G. Holland, review of The Symbolist Prints of Edvard Munch: The Vivian and David Campbell Collection, p. 1652.

Hudson Review, autumn, 1992, John Loughery, review of Käthe Kollwitz, pp. 445-451.

Kliatt, July, 2001, Paula Rohrlick, review of Scenes of American Life, p. 41.

Library Journal, December 1, 1983, Douglas G. Campbell, review of Edvard Munch, Master Printmaker, p. 2245; June 15, 1997, Jack Perry Brown, review of The Symbolist Prints of Edvard Munch, p. 65; June 1, 2000, Jack Perry Brown, review of The Gilded Age and American Impressionism, p. 122; July, 2001, Douglas F. Smith, review of Scenes of American Life, p. 84.

London Review of Books, September 17, 1984, review of Edvard Munch, Master Printmaker, p. 2.

New York Times Book Review, July 19, 1992, Mignon Nixon, review of Käthe Kollwitz, p. 20; April 27, 1997, Robin Lippincott, review of The Symbolist Prints of Edvard Munch, p. 24.

Quill & Quire, April, 1997, Christopher Hume, review of The Symbolist Prints of Edvard Munch, p. 33.

School Arts, September, 2000, Kent Anderson, review of American Impressionism, p. 60; March, 2001, Kent Anderson, review of The Gilded Age, p. 54.

Times Literary Supplement, March 22, 1985, Roger Cardinal, review of Edvard Munch, Master Printmaker, p. 320; April 12, 2002, Chase Madar, review of After the Scream: The Late Paintings of Edvard Munch, p. 30.

Woman's Art Journal, spring-summer, 1994, Carol Small, review of Käthe Kollwitz, pp. 44-47.

Women's Review of Books, December, 1992, Karen Malpede, review of Käthe Kollwitz, p. 5.

ONLINE

Georgetown University Web site,http://www.georgetown.edu/ (April 15, 2007), "Elizabeth Prelinger."

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