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Markovits, Andrei S. 1948-

Markovits, Andrei S. 1948-

PERSONAL:

Born October 6, 1948, in Timisoara, Romania; immigrated to the United States, 1960; became naturalized citizen, 1971; son of Ludwig and Ida Markovits; married; wife's name Kiki. Education: Columbia University, B.A., 1969, M.B.A., 1971, M.A., 1973, M.Phil., 1974, Ph.D., 1976. Religion: Jewish.

ADDRESSES:

Home—Ann Arbor, MI. Office—University of Michigan, 3110 Modern Lang Bldg., 812 E. Washington St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1275. E-mail—[email protected]

CAREER:

Institute for Advanced Studies, Vienna, Austria, research associate, 1973-74; New York University, New York, NY, faculty member, 1974; John Jay College of Criminal Justice, City University of New York, New York, NY, faculty member, 1974; Columbia University, New York, NY, faculty member, 1975; Central European Studies, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, senior research associate, 1975-99; Wesleyan University, Middletown, CT, assistant professor of government, 1977-83; Wirtschafts und Sozialwissenschaftliches Institute, German Trade University Federation, Düsseldorf, Germany, research associate, 1979; International Institute for Comparative Social Research, Science Center, Berlin, Germany, research associate, 1980; Boston University, Boston, MA, associate professor of political science, 1983-92; University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA, department of politics, professor, chair, 1995-99; University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, department of Germanic languages and literature, department of political science, department of sociology, professor, 1999-2003, Karl W. Deutsch Collegiate professor of comparative politics and German studies, 2003—.

Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel, visiting professor, 1986; Osnabruck University, Osnabruck, Germany, visiting professor, 1987; Bochum University, visiting professor, 1991; University of Innsbruck, Austria, Fulbright professor, 1996; Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, visiting professor, 2002-03; St. Gallen University, Switzerland, visiting professor, 2004; Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel, visiting professor, 2005; Dortmund University, Dortmund, Germany, visiting professor, 2006; Webster University, Vienna, Austria, visiting professor, 2008. Presenter of academic papers at numerous conferences and lectures around the world; regular commentator for radio and television.

MEMBER:

New York Academy of Sciences, American Political Science Association, International Political Science Association, American Association of University Professors, Pi Sigma Alpha, Sigma Iota Rho.

AWARDS, HONORS:

University President's fellowship, Columbia University, 1969; New York State scholar, Columbia University, 1969; B'nai B'rith Foundation fellow, 1976-77; Kalmus Foundation fellow, 1976-77; Ford Foundation fellow, 1979; Hans Boeckler Foundation fellow, 1982; Institute for Advanced Study Berlin fellow, 1998-99; Golden Apple Award for Best Teacher, University of Michigan, 2007; Tronstein Award for Political Science, 2007; Leuphana University, Ph.D. (honorary), 2007; Center for Study in Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University Fellow, 2008-09.

WRITINGS:

(Editor, with Karl W. Deutsch) Fear of Science, Trust in Science: Conditions for Change in the Climate of Opinion, Oelgeschlager (Cambridge, MA), 1980.

(Editor) The Political Economy of West Germany: Modell Deutschland, foreword by George K. Romoser, Praeger Publishers (New York, NY), 1982.

(Editor, with Frank E. Sysyn) Nationbuilding and the Politics of Nationalism: Essays on Austrian Galicia, Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute (Cambridge, MA), 1982.

(Editor, with Karl W. Deutsch and John Platt) Advances in the Social Sciences, 1900-1980: What, Who, Where, How?, University Press of America (Lanham, MD), 1986.

The Politics of the West German Trade Unions: Strategies of Class and Interest Representation in Growth and Crisis, Cambridge University Press (New York, NY), 1986.

(Editor, with Mark Silverstein) The Politics of Scandal: Power and Process in Liberal Democracies, Holmes & Meier (New York, NY), 1988.

The West German Left, Polity Press (Oxford, England), 1993.

(With Philip S. Gorski) The German Left: Red, Green and Beyond, Oxford University Press (New York, NY), 1993.

(Editor, with Michael G. Huelshoff and Simon Reich) From Bundesrepublik to Deutschland: German Politics after Unification, University of Michigan Press (Ann Arbor, MI), 1993.

(With Simon Reich) The German Predicament: Memory and Power in the New Europe, Cornell University Press (Ithaca, NY), 1997.

Breakdown, Breakup, Breakthrough: Germany's Difficult Passage to Modernity, edited by Carl Lankowski, Berghahn Books (New York, NY), 1999.

(With Jürgen Elsässer) Die Fratze Der Eigenen Geschichte: Von Der Goldhagen-Debatte Zum Jugoslawien-Krieg, Elefanten Press (Berlin, Germany), 1999.

(With Steven L. Hellerman) Offside: Soccer and American Exceptionalism, Princeton University Press (Princeton, NJ), 2001.

(With Sieglinde K. Rosenberger) Demokratie: Mudus Und Telos, Bohlau Verlag (Vienna, Austria), 2001.

Amerika, Dich Hasst Sich's Besser: Antiamerikanismus Und Antisemitismus in Europa, KVV Konkret (Hamburg, Germany), 2004.

Uncouth Nation: Why Europe Dislikes America, Princeton University Press (Princeton, NJ), 2007.

Querpass: Sport Und Politik in Europa Und Den USA, Die Werkstatt (Göttingen, Germany), 2007.

Contributor of articles and book reviews to numerous journals, including French Politics, Society and Culture, American Historical Review, Contemporary Austrian Studies, American Political Science Review, American Journal of Sociology, British Journal of Industrial Relations, Central European History, German Studies Review, Industrial and Labor Relations Review, and Political Science Quarterly.

SIDELIGHTS:

Andrei S. Markovits was born on October 6, 1948, in Timisoara, Romania. An only child, he grew up speaking both German and Hungarian at home, while at school he was taught Romanian. Extending his multilingual training, he began to learn English when he was quite young, and later added French to his curriculum. When he was nine years old, Markovits left Romania with his father, immigrating to Vienna, Austria, and then moving once more, heading to the United States, arriving in New York. For the most of his primary and secondary schooling, he was educated in Vienna, returning home to New York and his father only during summers. Once he had graduated, however, he returned to New York for good and enrolled at Columbia University. He earned his undergraduate degree in 1969, but continued on at Columbia for his graduate work, ultimately completing the studies for an additional four degrees, including a master's degree, a master of business administration, a master of philosophy, and a doctorate. As he was completing his final course work and dissertation, Markovits spent a year in Vienna as a research associate for the Institute for Advanced Studies. He then served on the faculty of several New York-area colleges in an effort to gain teaching experience, including New York University and the John Jay College of Criminal Justice of the City University of New York. Once he had his doctorate, he moved to Harvard University as a research associate for the Center for European Studies, a position he held for more than twenty years, even as he divided his attention with his other efforts. Then in 1977, Markovits accepted a position as an assistant professor of government at Wesleyan University in Middletown, Connecticut, the first of a number of prestigious academic posts. He has worked at a number of schools, including Boston University, the University of California at Santa Cruz, and most recently the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, where in 2003 he was named the Karl W. Deutsch Collegiate professor of comparative politics and German studies. His primary areas of research and academic interest include the history and progression of German and European labor, social democracy in Europe and specifically in Germany, German-Jewish relations, Germany's role in modern Europe, and both anti-American and anti-Semitic sentiments in Europe. He is also interested in how sports have developed in modern culture, and in the ways that humans and their pets have altered their mode of interaction in the wake of the more politically correct "green" attitude toward everyday life. He has written or cowritten numerous books pertaining to social and political sciences, and to both Germany and Europe at large in relationship to the political atmosphere.

The German Left: Red, Green and Beyond, which Markovits wrote with Philip S. Gorski, discusses the rise of various small, somewhat independent political parties in Europe and how this affects Germany. A number of these parties voice new, fresh agendas for the twenty-first century, including a "green" outlook, "ecology," or "new politics." In Germany, politics in the wake of World War Two is understood to be attempting to redeem the nation in some way, either by improving its position socially or economically or in whatever way is necessary at the time, serving as a type of atonement for the war just past. The book looks at the green party and how it has influenced the country, then moves on to address leftist ideologies and in relation to the Green Party and their own agenda. Finally, it addresses green politics more specifically and evaluates the chances of a green candidate making it into office. James Stuart Brice, in a review for West European Politics, found the book to be "an excellent introduction to the post-war German Left which focuses especially on the constellation of forces affecting the rise and success of the Greens."

A joint effort with Steven L. Hellerman, Offside: Soccer and American Exceptionalism addresses the question of why soccer, so universally considered to be a major pastime and beloved sport in nations around the world, has never really developed a following in the United States. Markovits and Hellerman also use the sports discussion as an opportunity to point out that another popular subject, while the basis for the political systems of many a country around the world, has never caught on in the U.S. either—socialism. On the sports side, the authors provide a fairly in-depth look into why soccer is not as popular in the United States as one might expect, given its otherwise global appeal. Unlike football and baseball, sports considered to be purely American, soccer failed to get integrated into sports curriculums in high schools and universities, nor did it have a strong, unifying organizational group striving to help it become more popular and well known. It gained a reputation as a foreign sport early on, again contrasted against the attraction of playing a purely American sport. However, none of these early reasons appear to carry into the present, and Markovits and Hellerman fail to provide a suitably strong rationale for the continued failure of soccer to catch on in the U.S. Frank Deford, in a review for Sports Illustrated, remarked that Markovits and Hellerman actually miss the point of soccer's lack of popularity in the United States. He declared that "the authors ignore perhaps our greatest distinction. We don't import culture…. No, what we Americans do is we pass along our stuff to other, impressionable peoples: movies, music, Coca-Cola, the English language, basketball, bacon double cheeseburgers and what have you." He went on to conclude that "soccer developed outside the U.S., and unlike most everything else in the world, it lacks our influence."

In Uncouth Nation: Why Europe Dislikes America, Markovits addresses the issue of the disdain with which Europeans and, indeed, citizens of many other parts of the world, regard the citizens of the United States. Particularly in the wake of the U.S. invasion of Iraq, Americans have become most unpopular around the world. Markovits himself, a naturalized U.S. citizen, has taken to referring to himself as British when he travels out of the United States for any purpose. However, as he explains in his book, anti-American sentiments are not really a new phenomenon, though the George W. Bush administration, particularly given his second term in office, has gone a long way to exacerbate the issue. Markovits has researched his subject extensively, and the result is a long history filled with documentation that indicates that the United States was feared and disliked for many reasons and by many global citizens years before Bush took office. He offers readers a collection of quotes from notable Europeans in different eras, many of whom had little nice to say about the U.S. Mary Fitzgerald, however, in a review for the New Statesman, was unsure of the veracity of Markovits's claims. She remarked: "Markovits has dedicated his book to ‘transatlantic souls and beings all.’ Yet, in the end, he has parked himself firmly in one camp—mocking ‘virtuous Europe’ and … batting exclusively for his own team. This is a pity, because an intelligent, balanced debate on the subject is long overdue. Facile America-bashing has indeed become a boring, intellectually lazy European pastime. But it does not mean that America's riposte should be the same."

BIOGRAPHICAL AND CRITICAL SOURCES:

PERIODICALS

American Historical Review, October 1, 1995, Raymond Dominick, review of The German Left: Red, Green and Beyond, p. 1262.

American Journal of Sociology, January 1, 2002, John Wilson, review of Offside: Soccer and American Exceptionalism, p. 1131.

American Political Science Review, March 1, 1990, Paul E. Peterson, review of The Politics of Scandal: Power and Process in Liberal Democracies, p. 346; December 1, 1994, W. David Patterson, review of From Bundesrepublik to Deutschland: German Politics after Unification, p. 1015; March 1, 1995, Herbert Kitschelt, review of The German Left, p. 232; March 1, 1998, Beverly Crawford, review of The German Predicament: Memory and Power in the New Europe, p. 261.

Book World, March 4, 2007, "Exploring the Roots of Anti-Americanism among European Elites," p. 15.

Central European History, December 22, 1994, Diethelm Prowe, review of From Bundesrepublik to Deutschland, p. 123; January 1, 1995, review of The German Left, p. 116; April 1, 1995, Jeffry M. Diefendorf, review of The German Left, p. 116.

Change, March 1, 1982, review of Fear of Science, Trust in Science: Conditions for Change in the Climate of Opinion, p. 58.

Choice: Current Reviews for Academic Libraries, September 1, 1994, A. Pickel, review of The German Left, p. 203; November 1, 1997, review of The German Predicament, p. 558; December 1, 2001, M.L. Krotee, review of Offside, p. 723; August 1, 2007, P.H. Loedel, review of Uncouth Nation: Why Europe Dislikes America, p. 2173.

Chronicle of Higher Education, June 1, 2001, review of Offside.

Comparative Political Studies, April 1, 1995, Cyrus Ernesto Zirakzadeh, review of The German Left, p. 155; October 1, 1997, Cecilia Chessa, review of The German Predicament, p. 631.

Comparative Politics, October 1, 1997, Sheri Berman, review of The German Left, p. 101.

Contemporary European History, July 1, 1998, Jan Muller, review of The German Predicament, p. 271.

Contemporary Sociology, November 1, 1994, Peter H. Merkl, review of The German Left, p. 806; May 1, 1998, Jeffrey Herf, review of The German Predicament, p. 296; July 1, 2002, Steve Dawson, review of Offside, p. 437.

Environmental Politics, summer, 1994, Brian Doherty, review of The German Left, p. 335.

Ethics, January 1, 1990, Keith Graham, review of The Politics of Scandal, p. 466.

Foreign Affairs, July 1, 1994, Fritz Stern, review of The German Left; November 1, 1997, Stanley Hoffmann, review of The German Predicament.

German Politics and Society, fall, 2007, Jeffrey J. Anderson, review of Uncouth Nation, p. 89.

International Studies Quarterly, May 1, 1998, Richard C. Eichenberg, review of The German Predicament, p. 97.

Journal of Economic Literature, December 1, 1997, review of The German Predicament, p. 2204.

Journal of Modern History, June 1, 1999, Robert G. Moeller, review of The German Predicament, p. 504.

Journal of Politics, May 1, 1999, Helga A. Welsh, review of The German Predicament, p. 591.

Library Journal, March 1, 1997, Dennis L. Noble, review of The German Predicament, p. 86; March 1, 2007, David Keymer, review of Uncouth Nation, p. 98.

New Statesman, February 12, 2007, Mary Fitzgerald, "Love to Hate You," p. 59.

Publishers Weekly, February 17, 1989, Penny Kaganoff, review of The Politics of Scandal, p. 70.

Reason, December 1, 2000, review of The Politics of Scandal, p. 52.

Reference & Research Book News, May 1, 2007, review of Uncouth Nation.

Review of Politics, January 1, 1988, Christopher S. Allen, review of The Politics of the West German Trade Unions: Strategies of Class and Interest Representation in Growth and Crisis, p. 161; fall, 1994, E. Gene Frankland, review of The German Left, p. 813.

SAIS Review, summer, 1999, Ralf J. Leiteritz, review of The German Predicament.

Science & Society, winter, 2000, Renate Bridenthal, review of The German Predicament, p. 522.

Sociological Review, August 1, 2002, review of Offside, p. 455.

Sociology, November 1, 1997, Andreas Hess, review of The German Predicament, p. 822.

Sports Illustrated, July 2, 2001, Frank Deford, "Not Our Cup of Tea: Soccer Will Never Thrive Here, the Author Opines, Because It's Simply Un-American," p. 6.

Survival, spring, 1998, Steven Muller, review of The German Predicament, p. 158.

Times Literary Supplement, October 10, 1997, Alan S. Milward, review of The German Predicament, p. 8.

West European Politics, January 1, 1996, James Stuart Brice, review of The German Left, p. 187.

ONLINE

Princeton University Press Web site,http://press.princeton.edu/ (September 10, 2008), author profile.

University of Michigan Department of Political Science Web site,http://polisci.lsa.umich.edu/ (September 10, 2008), faculty profile.

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