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Locricchio, Matthew 1947-

Locricchio, Matthew 1947-

PERSONAL:

Born June 3, 1947, in Detroit, MI; son of Paul (a caterer) and Virginia (a caterer) Locricchio. Ethnicity: "Sicilian-American." Education: Attended Eastern Michigan University; trained with American Conservatory Theater.

ADDRESSES:

Home—Bronx, NY. E-mail—[email protected]

CAREER:

Chef and cookbook author; presenter of international cooking programs at American Museum of Natural History and the Institute of Culinary Education. Professional actor on stage, in films and television presentations, and in commercials.

MEMBER:

International Association of Culinary Professionals, Actors' Equity Association, Screen Actors Guild, American Federation of Television and Radio Artists.

AWARDS, HONORS:

Best Book in the United States for Children and Family and Best Book in the World for Children and Family Honorable Mention, Gourmand World Cookbook, both 2005, and Disney Adventures Book Award for Best Hands-On Book, all for The International Cookbook for Kids.

WRITINGS:

"SUPERCHEF" COOKBOOKS FOR CHILDREN SERIES

The Cooking of France, Benchmark Books (New York, NY), 2003.

The Cooking of China, Benchmark Books (New York, NY), 2003.

The Cooking of Mexico, Benchmark Books (New York, NY), 2003.

The Cooking of Italy, Benchmark Books (New York, NY), 2003.

The Cooking of Brazil, Benchmark Books (New York, NY), 2005.

The Cooking of Thailand, Benchmark Books (New York, NY), 2005.

The Cooking of India, Benchmark Books (New York, NY), 2005.

The Cooking of Greece, Benchmark Books (New York, NY), 2005.

The International Cookbook for Kids, Marshall Cavendish Children's Books (New York, NY), 2005.

SIDELIGHTS:

Matthew Locricchio told CA: "I write cookbooks because of my love for good food prepared the right way with wholesome, fresh ingredients. I have wanted to communicate this love to young chefs because I believe the younger generation is ready to eat better and to eat healthier. I think international recipes from pizza to tacos to stir-fries offer a way to encourage this.

"As a cookbook author I am of course greatly influenced by the classic cookbook authors: Julia Child, Marcella Hazan, James Beard. I am also heavily influenced by my parents, who were wonderful cooks and who passed on to me their love of cooking and the pleasure of sharing food with friends and family.

"My interest in food writing was really planted in me by my mother. She was such a fine, intuitive cook that she usually prepared dishes without using recipes. That changed when she started her catering company. She researched and developed the recipes that they used, and that taught me the value of consistency in good recipe development.

"I start with the recipes. When I created the ‘Superchef Series,’ I looked for the dishes that best represented each culture. Once the recipes were in place, then I began the long process of testing and adapting them to the readership and making sure they worked. The introductions to my books, which are a very important part of them, came last.

"Just because you have a publisher for a book or a series of books does not mean they will support what you have written. It is up to the author to keep a book alive.

"My books are like members of my family. I love each one for a different reason. They all are unique.

"The only effect I can hope for [my books to have] is that the reader will try my recipes, discover they work, and be inspired to return to the kitchen and keep cooking. I also want my readers to understand the value of local and organic ingredients and why it is so important to support local farmers."

BIOGRAPHICAL AND CRITICAL SOURCES:

PERIODICALS

Booklist, December 15, 2002, Gillian Engberg, review of The Cooking of France, p. 749.

Children's Bookwatch, April, 2003, review of "Superchef" series, p. 7; January, 2005, review of The International Cookbook for Kids; February, 2005, review of "Superchef" series.

Horn Book Guide, review of "Superchef" series, p. 155.

Library Media Connection, August, 2003, review of The Cooking of France, p. 94; April-May, 2005, Anitra Gordon, review of The International Cookbook for Kids, p. 93.

Publishers Weekly, January 10, 2005, review of The International Cookbook for Kids, p. 58.

School Library Journal, February, 2003, Genevieve Gallagher, review of The Cooking of China, p. 164; April, 2003, Augusta R. Malvagno, review of The Cooking of Italy, p. 185; January, 2005, Joyce Adams Burner, review of The International Cookbook for Kids, p. 105; February, 2005, Joyce Adams Burner, review of The International Cookbook for Kids, p. 59; February, 2005, Joyce Adams Burner, review of The Cooking of India, p. 148; April, 2005, Joyce Adams Burner, review of The Cooking of Greece, p. 155; October, 2005, review of The International Cookbook for Kids, p. S55.

ONLINE

Matthew Locricchio Home Page,http://www.matthewlocricchio.com (February 19, 2007).

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