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Ikenberry, G. John

PERSONAL:

Male. Education: Manchester College, B.A.; University of Chicago, Ph.D., 1985.

ADDRESSES:

Home—Princeton, NJ. Office—Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University, Robertson Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544-1013. E-mail—[email protected]

CAREER:

Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, assistant professor, 1985-92, Albert G. Milbank Professor of Politics and International Affairs, 2004—; Carn- egie Endowment for International Peace, senior associate, 1992-93; University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, professor, 1993-99, director of the Lauder Institute, 1994-98; Georgetown University, Washington, DC, Peter F. Krogh Professor of Geopolitics and Global Justice in the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service, 2001-04. Member of advisory group and former member of Policy Planning staff, U.S. State Department, 1991-92; senior associate, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, 1992-93; member, Henry Kissinger-Lawrence Summers commission on the Future of Transatlantic Relations, Council on Foreign Relations. Lecturer in Asia, Europe, and the United States.

AWARDS, HONORS:

Transatlantic Fellow, German Marshall Fund; fellow, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars; Hitachi International Affairs Fellow, Council on Foreign Relations; U.S.-Japan Foundation grant; Committee for Global Partnership grant; Wilson Center fellow, 1998-99; nonresident senior fellow, Brookings Institution, 1997-2002; Schroeder-Jervis Award, American Political Science Association, 2002, for After Victory: Institutions, Strategic Restraint, and the Rebuilding of Order after Major Wars.

WRITINGS:


Reasons of State: Oil Politics and the Capacities of American Government, Cornell University Press (Ithaca, NY), 1988.

(Editor, with David A. Lake and Michael Mastanduno) The State and American Foreign Economic Policy, Cornell University Press (Ithaca, NY), 1988.

(Editor) American Foreign Policy: Theoretical Essays, Scott, Foresman (Glenview, IL), 1989, 5th edition, Georgetown University (New York, NY), 2005.

(With John A. Hall) The State, University of Minnesota Press (Minneapolis, MN), 1989.

(Editor, with Michael C. Doyle) New Thinking in International Relations Theory, Westview Press (Boulder, CO), 1997.

(Editor, with Michael Cox and Takashi Inoguchi) American Democracy Promotion: Impulses, Strategies, and Impacts, Oxford University Press (New York, NY), 2000.

After Victory: Institutions, Strategic Restraint, and the Rebuilding of Order after Major Wars, Princeton University Press (Princeton, NJ), 2001.

(Editor) America Unrivaled: The Future of the Balance of Power, Cornell University Press (Ithaca, NY), 2002.

(Editor, with T.V. Paul and John A. Hall) The Nation-State in Question, Princeton University Press (Princeton, NJ), 2003.

(With Joseph M. Grieco) State Power and World Markets: The International Political Economy, W.W. Norton (New York, NY), 2003.

(Editor, with Takashi Inoguchi) Reinventing the Alliance: U.S.-Japan Security Partnership in an Era of Change, Palgrave Macmillan (New York, NY), 2003.

(Editor, with Michael Mastanduno) International Relations Theory and the Asia-Pacific, Columbia University Press (New York, NY), 2003.

Contributes regularly to foreign policy and international relations journals, and to Foreign Affairs. Coeditor, International Relations of the Asia Pacific; editorial committee, World Politics; book reviewer, Foreign Affairs.

WORK IN PROGRESS:

An essay collection titled Liberal Order and Imperial Ambition: American Power and International Order, for Princeton University Press.

SIDELIGHTS:

G. John Ikenberry is an educator, writer, and political theorist with a broad professional background in international relations, particularly as they relate to U.S. foreign policy. He has written a variety of books on politics, international policy, and the place of the United States in the global political and economic arena. An opponent of U.S. policy regarding the war against terrorism, Ikenberry believes the end result of American actions abroad will be the alienation of the nation's traditional allies and a blow to the global economy.

In After Victory: Institutions, Strategic Restraint, and the Rebuilding of Order after Major Wars, Ikenberry looks at major institutions that were created in the wake of international conflict and how the victorious nations in each war succeeded as a result. New Republic reviewer Stephen Holmes wrote: "Ikenberry's leading idea—that the United States stabilized and increased its power after 1945 by ‘a strategy of self-binding’—is paradoxical and provocative, but it is not entirely convincing. He admits as much when he describes it as a ‘stylization’ or an ‘ideal type.’"

New Thinking in International Relations Theory, which Ikenberry edited with Michael W. Doyle, addresses various schools of thought regarding international relations. Robert W. Cox, in a review for the American Political Science Review, noted that, despite the international moniker, "not only are the contributing authors all Americans, teaching in American universities, but the frame of reference of discussion concerning IR theory is also specifically American." He went on to remark that "within the limits of this intellectual framework, the book has considerable merit." Writing for the Political Science Quarterly, John W. Outland found that the "book has much to commend it. It is broad and sophisticated in its coverage, and it has a theme, of sorts. Certain of its articles—such as those by Kahler, Grieco, and Deudney—are especially valuable."

In International Relations Theory and the Asia-Pacific, which Ikenberry edited with Michael Mastanduno, contributors address the question of whether Asia will remain politically and economically sound, or whether conflict will undermine the region's stability, while also examining whether western theory, particularly American theory, can be applied to the Asian political and economic model. Reviewing the volume for Pacific Affairs, Yasuhiro Izumikawa remarked: "The end product is a collection of theoretically sound yet empirically rich articles on East Asia." Of the organization of the volume, he added that it "yields an interesting analysis even for area study specialists."

BIOGRAPHICAL AND CRITICAL SOURCES:


PERIODICALS


American Political Science Review, December, 1998, Robert W. Cox, review of New Thinking in International Relations Theory, p. 972.

Foreign Affairs, March-April, 1997, David C. Hendrickson, review of American Foreign Policy: Theoretical Essays, p. 184.

Joint Force Quarterly, spring, 2002, Geoffrey D.W. Wawro, "The Fight for Peace," review of After Victory: Institutions, Strategic Restraint, and the Rebuilding of Order after Major Wars, p. 111.

Middle East Journal, winter, 2004, review of The Nation-State in Question, p. 168.

National Interest, summer, 2001, J.M. Roberts, "Pushing Restraint," review of After Victory, p. 125.

New Republic, November 19, 2001, Stephen Holmes, "Alone Together," review of After Victory, p. 45.

Pacific Affairs, spring, 2004, Yasuhiro Izumikawa, review of International Relations Theory and the Asia-Pacific, p. 96.

Perspectives on Political Science, summer, 2003, Fred H. Lawson, review of America Unrivaled: The Future of the Balance of Power, p. 173.

Political Science Quarterly, winter, 1999, John W. Outland, review of New Thinking on International Relations Theory, p. 58; summer, 2001, Peter Liberman, review of After Victory, p. 333.

ONLINE


Princeton University Web site,http://www.wws.princeton.edu/ (July 18, 2006), faculty biography on Ikenberry.

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