Hoeveler, J. David, Jr. 1943-

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HOEVELER, J. David, Jr. 1943-

PERSONAL:

Born July 31, 1943, in Bridgeport, CT; son of John D. (a financial executive) and Virginia (a homemaker; maiden name, Thornburgh) Hoeveler; married Diane Long (a professor), January 29, 1972; children: John, Emily. Education: Lehigh University, B.A., 1965; University of Illinois—Urbana-Champaign, M.A., 1967, Ph.D., 1971.

ADDRESSES:

Home—3004 East Hampshire St., Milwaukee, WI 53211. Office—Department of History, University of Wisconsin—Milwaukee, P.O. Box 413, Milwaukee, WI 53201. E-mail[email protected]

CAREER:

University of Illinois—Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, instructor in history, 1970-71; University of Wisconsin—Milwaukee, Milwaukee, assistant professor of history, 1971-73; Yale University, New Haven, CT, research fellow at Institution for Social and Policy Studies, 1973-74; University of Wisconsin—Milwaukee, assistant professor, 1974-77, associate professor, 1977-83, professor of history, 1983—, department chair, 1989-92, senior fellow of Center for Twentieth Century Studies, 1980 and 1989, and coordinator of Comparative Studies of Religion Program.

MEMBER:

American Historical Association, Organization of American Historians, American Society for Eighteenth Century Studies, National Trust for Historic Preservation, Wisconsin State Historical Society.

AWARDS, HONORS:

Grants from American Council of Learned Societies, 1973, and Lynde Bradley and Harry Bradley Foundation, 1988.

WRITINGS:

The New Humanism: A Critique of Modern America, 1900-1940, University Press of Virginia (Charlottesville, VA), 1977.

James McCosh and the Scottish Intellectual Tradition: From Glasgow to Princeton, Princeton University Press (Princeton, NJ), 1981.

Watch on the Right: Conservative Intellectuals in the Reagan Era, University of Wisconsin Press (Madison, WI), 1991.

The Postmodernist Turn: American Thought and Culture in the 1970s, Twayne Publishers (New York, NY), 1996.

Creating the American Mind: Intellect and Politics in the Colonial Colleges, Rowman & Littlefield (Lanham, MD), 2002.

Contributor of articles and reviews to history journals.

SIDELIGHTS:

J. David Hoeveler, Jr., once told CA: "My work has varied between somewhat formalistic intellectual history and an institutional focus for the study of ideas. In my study of the new humanists (Paul Elmer More, Irving Babbitt, and others) I used the dualistic philosophy of the humanists to trace the continuity of their thinking in the several fields of American life they addressed (literature and criticism, education, politics, and religion) and to define their points of differentiation from competing intellectual groups. In my work on James McCosh I endeavored to set the Scottish philosophy, of which McCosh was a late adherent, in a transatlantic context, especially defining its import for McCosh's academic and administrative career as the president of the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University). In Watch on the Right: Conservative Intellectuals in the Reagan Era and The Postmodernist Turn: American Thought and Culture in the 1970s I am exploring contemporary subjects, including conservatism, postmodernism, and post-structuralism in both their European and American settings."

BIOGRAPHICAL AND CRITICAL SOURCES:

PERIODICALS

American Historical Review, April, 1978; June, 1982.

American Spectator, July, 1991, review of Watch on the Right: Conservative Intellectuals in the Reagan Era, p. 39.

Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, January, 1993, review of Watch on the Right, p. 181.

Booklist, April 15, 1991, review of Watch on the Right, p. 1606.

Choice, November, 1991, review of Watch on the Right, p. 522; July, 1997, review of The Postmodernist Turn: American Thought and Culture in the 1970s, p. 1864.

Christian Century, September 4, 1991, review of Watch on the Right, p. 824.

Journal of American History, June, 1982; March, 1992, review of Watch on the Right, p. 1529.

Journal of Southern History, November, 1992, review of Watch on the Right, p. 755.

Library Journal, June 1, 1991, review of Watch on the Right, p. 166.

National Review, May 13, 1991, Geoffrey Morris, review of Watch on the Right, p. 50.

Perspectives on Political Science, summer, 1992, review of Watch on the Right, p. 161.

Political Science Quarterly, winter, 1991, review of Watch on the Right, p. 747.

Publishers Weekly, March 8, 1991, Genevieve Stuttaford, review of Watch on the Right, p. 60.

Reference Services Review, January, 1996, review of Watch on the Right, p. 50.

Reviews in American History, September, 1992, review of Watch on the Right, p. 400.

Sewanee Review, October, 1978.

Times Literary Supplement, August 2, 1991, review of Watch on the Right, p. 20.

ONLINE

University of Wisconsin—Milwaukee Web Site,http://www.uwm.edu/ (April 16, 2003), Terry Higgins, review of Creating the American Mind: Intellect and Politics in the Colonial Colleges.*