Heenan, David A. 1940-

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HEENAN, David A. 1940-

PERSONAL: Born 1940. Education: College of William and Mary, A.B., 1961; Columbia University, M.B.A., 1966; University of Pennsylvania, Wharton School, Ph.D., 1972.

ADDRESSES: Agent—c/o Caroline O'Connell, Caroline O'Connell Communications 11275 La Maida St., Suite 200, North Hollywood, CA 91601-4514. E-mail—[email protected]

CAREER: Author and businessman. Caltex Oil Corporation, New York, NY, assistant to the director, 1966, sales manager, Sydney, Australia, 1967-68; McKinsey & Co., New York, associate, 1969; First National City Bank, New York, director of human resources, 1969-72; Citicorp, New York, 1972-75; University of Hawaii, vice president for academic affairs, 1975-82; Theodore H. Davies and Co., Ltd., Honolulu, chairman of the board, chief executive officer, and president, board of directors, 1982—; trustee for estate of James Campbell. Maui Land & Pineapple Co. Inc., chairman, 2003. Military service: U.S. Marine Corps, captain, 1961-65.

WRITINGS:

Multinational Management of Human Resources: A Systems Approach, Bureau of Business Research, University of Texas (Austin, TX), 1975.

(With Howard V. Perlmutter) Multinational Organization Development, Addison-Wesley (Reading, MA), 1979.

The Re-United States of America: An Action Agenda for Improving Business, Government, and Labor Relations, Addison-Wesley (Reading, MA), 1983.

The New Corporate Frontier: The Big Move to Small Town, USA, McGraw-Hill (New York, NY), 1991.

(With Warren Bennis) Co-Leaders: The Power of Great Partnerships, John Wiley (New York, NY), 1999.

Double Lives: Crafting Your Life of Work and Passion for Untold Success, Davies-Black Publishers (Palo Alto), 2002.

SIDELIGHTS: David A. Heenan has distinguished himself in the academic world and in business. He has written steadily throughout his professional life, with titles that include Multinational Management of Human Resources: A Systems Approach and Double Lives: Crafting Your Life of Work and Passion for Untold Success. Over the years, Heenan has focused on defining styles of leadership and the characteristics of successful leaders, as well as identifying techniques that enable people to work together more productively. Quality of life issues have also been among his concerns. He has addressed this topic in two books, Double Lives and The New Corporate Frontier: The Big Move to Small Town, USA.

In Co-Leaders: The Power of Great Partnerships Heenan and coauthor Warren Bennis argue that the future belongs not to solitary leaders, but to those individuals willing to work with a partner. As a reviewer in Publishers Weekly pointed out, the form this partnership often takes is that of one very visible individual who is working in tandem with someone else of equal capability, but who maintains a significantly lower public profile. Heenan and Bennis's book presents a detailed look at successful leadership partnerships, defining the different styles and the elements that lead to their productivity. Examples are not drawn exclusively from the business world. Figures from politics, sports, and literature are also included. The authors employ an historical approach, looking at leadership from ancient Crete up to and including contemporary times. By examining the lives of people who have occupied a secondary, but crucial role, Heenan and Bennis show how and why this arrangement can produce beneficial results. Although most of the attention is paid to the value of shared leadership at the highest level, the authors suggest that shared responsibility at all levels of an organization produces the most desirable result. Critics responded positively to the ideas and arguments offered in Co-Leaders.

The New Corporate Frontier describes the late-twentieth-century trend of large businesses relocating to smaller towns. In 1960 130 of the Fortune 500 companies were located in New York; by 1990 that figure had fallen to only forty-three. Chicago and other large cities showed similar decreases. The new, desirable business locations are in parts of the country that are not within commuting distance to large cities. Larger corporations are generally relocating to small cities, suburbs and business enclaves set in rural areas. These areas offer lower business costs, in the form of tax relief, cheaper labor and occupancy fees. Jan Hawn commented in a review in Government Finance Review that employees have the advantage of better schools, homes, jobs, decreased crime, and a slower pace of life. Heenan expresses some concern for the effects of this trend on urban life and challenged the reader to think about the future of the large cities. He is, however, an advocate of the move away from the cities, and has found a receptive audience among city council members, urban planners and economic development experts. Ten guideposts based on the success of these new communities are described, as well as clear advice to CEO's contemplating such a change. The book was lauded for its thoughtful look at an important trend.

Double Lives is concerned with quality of life, but in a more personal way than The New Corporate Frontier.This book moves away from strictly business and organizational interests and enters the realm of philosophy and psychology. In approaching this topic, however, Heenan maintains his straightforward approach, complete with useful checklists. Double Lives asserts that it is important to live a life of clear meaning and purpose. While recognizing the necessity of taking care of life's requirements, he argues for the importance of finding deep satisfaction through the pursuit of a personal interest. Profiled are such people as James Wolfensohn, Winston Churchill, and Sally Ride, all people with strong avocations that brought them an additional sense of fulfillment. In her review in Booklist, Mary Whaley pointed out that Heenan includes a list of twenty items aimed at keeping the individual focused and able to achieve the desired goal. The list includes the value of learning from failure, avoidance of procrastination, and the necessity of defining success.

BIOGRAPHICAL AND CRITICAL SOURCES:

PERIODICALS

Booklist, August, 2002, Mary Whaley, review of Double Lives: Crafting Your Life of Work and Passion for Untold Success, p. 1890.

Business Credit, October, 1991, Cindy Tursman, review of The New Corporate Frontier: The Big Move to Small Town, USA, p. 35.

Business Horizons, June, 1983, Calvin Reynolds, review of The Re-United States of America: An Action Agenda for Improving Business, Government, and Labor Relations, pp. 81-83.

Business Week, September 30, 1991, Bruce Hager, review of The New Corporate Frontier, p. 10.

Choice, December, 1991, R. A. Beauregard, review of The New Corporate Frontier, p. 634.

Forbes, September 16, 1991, James Cook, review of The New Corporate Frontier, p. 56; September 16, 2002, Caspar W. Weinberger, review of Double Lives, p. 37.

Government Finance Review, December, 1992, Jan Hawn, review of The New Corporate Frontier, p. 44.

HR Magazine, July, 1999, Jeanine Brannon, review of Co-Leaders: The Power of Great Partnerships, p. 150.

Journal of Business Strategy, September, 1999, Bristol Lane Voss, review of Co-Leaders, p. 45.

National Review, June 10, 1983, George Viksnins, review of The Re-United States of America, p. 708.

New York Times Book Review, December, 26, 1982, Paul Lewis, review of The Re-United States of America, p. 9.

Publishers Weekly, February 22, 1999, review of Co-Leaders, p. 80; June 17, 2002, review of Double Lives, p. 56.

Wall Street Review of Books, summer, 1984, Michael M. Kurth, review of The Re-United States of America, pp. 184-186.*