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Greider, William (Harold) 1936-

GREIDER, William (Harold) 1936-

PERSONAL: Surname is pronounced Gry-der; born August 6, 1936, in Cincinnati, OH; son of Harold William (a chemist) and Gladys (a teacher; maiden name, McClure) Greider; married Linda Furry (a writer), June 17, 1961; children: Cameron, Katharine. Education: Princeton University, A.B., 1958. Politics: Democrat.

ADDRESSES: Home—5931 Utah Ave. NW, Washington, DC 20015. Office—c/o Nation, 1025 Connecticut Ave. NW, #205, Washington, DC, 20036. Agent—Lynn Nesbit, Janklow and Nesbit, 598 Madison Ave., New York, NY 10022.

CAREER: Wheaton Daily Journal, Wheaton, IL, reporter, 1960-62; Louisville Times and Courier-Journal, Louisville, KY, reporter and Washington correspondent, 1962-68; Washington Post, Washington, DC, reporter and assistant managing editor of national news, 1968-82; Rolling Stone, Washington, DC, columnist and national affairs editor, 1982-99; Nation, Washington, DC, national affairs correspondent, 1999—. On-air correspondent for six Frontline documentaries, Public Broadcasting Service (PBS).

AWARDS, HONORS: First prize award for economic understanding, Champion International Corp., and George Polk Award in Journalism, Long Island University, both 1982, both for Atlantic Monthly article "The Education of David Stockman and Other Americans"; Pulitzer Prize nomination for commentary, 1982; Emmy Award for PBS Frontline documentary, "Return to Beirut," 1985; Los Angeles Times Book Prize, 1988, for Secrets of the Temple: How the Federal Reserve Runs the Country; Harry Chapin Media Award for Nation article, "The Last Farm Crisis," 2001; James Aronson Award for social justice journalism, 2002, for Nation article "The Right and U.S. Trade Law: Invalidating the 20th Century."

WRITINGS:

The Education of David Stockman and Other Americans, Dutton (New York, NY), 1982.

Secrets of the Temple: How the Federal Reserve Runs the Country, Simon & Schuster (New York, NY), 1988.

The Trouble with Money: A Prescription for America's Financial Fever, illustrated by Jeffrey Smith, with photographs by George Lange and charts by Genigraphics Corp., Whittle Direct Books (Knoxville, TN), 1989.

Who Will Tell the People?: The Betrayal of American Democracy, Simon & Schuster (New York, NY), 1992.

One World, Ready or Not: The Manic Logic of Global Capitalism, Simon & Schuster (New York, NY), 1997.

Fortress America: The American Military and the Consequences of Peace, PublicAffairs, 1998.

The Soul of Capitalism: Opening Paths to a Moral Economy, Simon & Schuster (New York, NY), 2003.

Contributor to periodicals, including Ramparts, Today's Education, Washington Monthly, Common Dreams, Atlantic Monthly, Esquire, and Washington Post Book World, and to newspapers, including the Seattle Post Intelligencer, International Herald Tribune, and Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.

SIDELIGHTS: William Greider is a journalist who writes on economics from a leftist perspective. In The Education of David Stockman and Other Americans, Greider examined the economic policies of President Ronald Reagan. In Secrets of the Temple: How the Federal Reserve Runs the Country, he explains the role of America's central bank in controlling the nation's money supply and interest rates. His One World, Ready or Not: The Manic Logic of Global Capitalism is a critique of world trade, while The Soul of Capitalism: Opening Paths to a Moral Economy calls for redefining capitalism's moral framework at a grassroots level.

When an article titled "The Education of David Stockman" appeared in the Atlantic Monthly in 1981, its author, William Greider, found himself in the middle of a highly publicized controversy along with the subject of his essay, the new director of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) under President Ronald Reagan. Based on a series of interviews conducted over a nine-month period beginning when Stockman first assumed his post in 1981, Greider's article chronicled the events surrounding the new OMB director's formidable challenge: to balance the federal budget by 1984 while accommodating the president's fiscal plan—what became known as "Reaganomics"—to reduce income taxes and increase defense spending. Written before Reagan's first budget went into effect, the article was critical of the president's approach.

The Atlantic Monthly story, reprinted in Greider's 1982 book, The Education of David Stockman and Other Americans, created a national furor because it exposed current federal budget contradictions, sending "a deliciously shocking thrill across a nation that had begun to feel as ignorant as a hog and didn't dare to grunt," wrote Harold Evans in a Washington Post Book World commentary. "From the beginning everyone knew, or should have known," noted Lester C. Thurow in the New York Review of Books, "that you could not put together huge tax cuts, gigantic increases in defense spending, a modest slowdown in the rate of growth of social welfare spending, and tight monetary policies without bringing on disaster."

Nevertheless, Stockman, a Republican and former U.S. congressman known for his staunch conservatism, was initially optimistic—despite what he called an "absolutely shocking" economic forecast—and sought to cut the budget by about forty billion dollars. Later, however, the thirty-four-year-old OMB director, whom the press had referred to as "the whiz kid" and "the boy wonder" of the Reagan administration, admitted to Greider that "none of us [in the OMB] really understands what's going on with all these numbers." The article created a public uproar, as Evans suggested, "because the proliferation of the daily [news] stories had splintered the reality: only [Greider's] comprehensive narrative, decoded, enabled people to understand what had been going on."

In addition to the reprinted article, The Education of David Stockman and Other Americans contains Greider's analysis of the public reaction to his Atlantic Monthly interviews with Stockman, as well as an examination of Reaganomics and its shortcomings. In a review in the Chicago Tribune Book World, Clarence Petersen described the latter section of the book as a "thoughtfully streetwise essay on the problems of supply-side economics and the effects of the political process" on the American economy. "Greider's narrative is now a piece of history," observed New Republic critic Bruce Mazlish, who added that the work is "destined to appear in future anthologies of politics, for it raises fundamental issues of faith, loyalty, betrayal, morality, and personality…. The 'Educa tion of David Stockman' is not just the story of an ambitious and complicated young man learning more about himself and politics, but an education for all of us."

Greider was involved in a second controversy with the publication of Secrets of the Temple, a history and analysis of America's central bank. In Secrets of the Temple, Greider contends that the Federal Reserve Board, a privately-owned, seven-member body appointed by the president that determines the nation's money supply and lending interest rates, has often instituted measures which prove damaging to the economy. Much of the book is devoted to a study of the Fed under Paul Volcker, who served as chairman from 1979 to 1987 and pursued a tight money policy that helped control runaway inflation. In Greider's opinion, however, that policy also contributed to a severe recession, a massive debt burden, a trade deficit, and an inequitable distribution of the nation's wealth. In a Rolling Stone article, Greider stated, "During the 1980s, whenever the Federal Reserve erred, it nearly always erred on the side of hard money—sacrificing the real economy to protect prices." He described the consequences as "devastating, like deep body wounds still not healed." Greider further criticized the Fed for operating independently of other government organizations. Greider, declared Peter Cook in Toronto's Globe and Mail, "sees the existence of a bunch of unelected but powerful technocrats at the Fed as an affront to the U.S. political system."

Like the Atlantic Monthly article before it, Secrets of the Temple generated intense debate among politicians, economists, and bankers. For their part, Federal Reserve officials acknowledged that Greider was correct in his assertion that their efforts to control inflation hurt the poor disproportionately, but they denied that these efforts were a deliberate attempt to protect the moneyed classes. And though other critics also disputed Greider's arguments, many praised his depth of research. "After this book," wrote Adam Smith in the New York Times Book Review, "the Fed can scarcely be called secret and mysterious. Even experienced professionals can find something to learn."

Greider dealt with more hot-button economic issues in One World, Ready or Not. In this work, he contends that manufacturers are producing far too many goods for consumers to buy; a key contributing factor here is that companies from developed nations have moved production to developing countries to be able to employ workers at low wages—so low that they cannot afford to buy the things that come out of the factories where they labor. He also is concerned that the influence of financial markets on government monetary policy could lead to deflation and that growth of industry around the world could devastate the environment. He foresaw catastrophic clashes between people with money and people without it if the trends of the time were allowed to continue. Greider does more than predict problems, however; he offers solutions. These include improving the wages and working conditions of employees on the lower economic rungs; increasing the power and respect accorded labor in general; and developing industries that are able to consume the waste they produce. Greider sees a need for government involvement—indeed, cooperation by governments around the world—to implement these programs.

One World, Ready or Not drew widely divergent responses. Some reviewers decried its negative characterization of market forces and endorsement of government intervention in economic matters. Brink Lindsey, writing in Reason, pronounced it "the bestwritten book on the global economy I have yet read," but went on to lament, "The virtues of this book are unfortunate, however, because its vices are so colossal. At virtually every turn, Greider's economic and political analysis could not be more drastically wrongheaded. He completely misunderstands how new wealth is generated and spread by market competition; as a result he sees ruin where there is promise, and then proposes 'solutions' that would be ruinous if adopted." John O. McGinnis, in the National Review, argued that "neither Greider's analysis of the problems of international trade and global capital markets nor his solutions for controlling them are likely to persuade anyone who has been intellectually awake for the last three decades." Greider, McGinnis contended, seeks to cure economic ills by applying globally "every social theory that has failed at the level of the nation-state." New Statesman contributor Alec Cairncross reflected that "the author has little faith in the ability of governments to regulate the activities of multinational corporations…. Yet, when he does say what kind of action he favours, it is inevitably to governments that he turns."

Several other commentators found that Greider raised issues worthy of serious consideration. In the New York Times Book Review, Matthew Miller noted that One World, Ready or Not "fluctuates … maddeningly between brilliance and fallacy in its analysis," and thought some of Greider's predictions too pessimistic—such as his prognostication that U.S. wages will inevitably drop until they are as low as those in the third world. But, Miller added: "You don't need to agree we're facing apocalypse soon to know we're facing spiraling unfairness already…. Mr. Greider rightly calls on governments to moderate (not derail) the pace of this latest industrial revolution and push the global system toward more equitable outcomes." Foreign Affairs contributor Walter Russell Mead remarked that "if Greider's answers are not always consistent or clear, the questions he raises are important, and they shed light on some of the issues and problems that will shape national and international politics over the coming decades." Jeffrey E. Garten, critiquing for the Harvard Business Review, thought it unlikely that Greider's proposals for sweeping government regulation and cooperation would become reality, but said the author "at least sets a direction for thinking by making it clear that a world economy on automatic pilot will eventually drive itself off a cliff." Miller concluded on a similar note: "In a season when politicians seem determined to make no large plans, Mr. Greider's ideas deserve wide debate…. Given the choice between economists with little passion for justice and progressive journalists like Mr. Greider with little patience for economics, it's the latter who stand the best chance of pointing us to a brighter world."

In 2003, Greider published The Soul of Capitalism, which proposes a return to the morality of one of his own uncles, a former bank president who took a night job to pay back his clients when the bank collapsed in 1907. Greider shows readers how the American system of capitalism damages its prospects for future prosperity, and in his book, the author promotes the power of ordinary people, rather than government intervention, to make small changes that accumulate, eventually reforming the system.

James Galbraith observed in the Seattle Times, "Greider's thesis is at one level indisputable: For better capitalism, better capitalists would help. But there is a tendency here to the romantic, which can only obscure the hard political struggles we face." Andrew Leonard at Salon.com, on the other hand, recognized that Greider "isn't actually striving to critique capitalism in the classic manner of a fire-breathing radical. Instead, he is setting out to give us new ways to think about how things can be perceived and changed." Among the new developments Greider addresses are the widespread growth of employee stock ownership plans and the financial power of swelling pension funds. Leonard suggested, "Instead of simply saying capitalism is wrong, Greider is asking us how to make it more right. Above all, he is expressing a profound faith in the American character, in the restless curiosity and endless innovation inherent in the national fiber."

In an article for Business Ethics, Greider asked, "Can we alter the basic operating values of American capitalism so that the priorities of society become dominant? Can we realign financial power relationships so people have greater voice and responsibility in determining the conditions of their own lives?", and answers, "While such bedrock changes will not be quick or easy, I believe they are within reach." In a TomPaine.com article, he remarked, "I resist cynicism by looking elsewhere for politics, sustaining my faith in a countervailing reality. Far distant from power, people are still doing politics on a human scale, face to face, and often winning life-giving triumphs, large and small, for their communities and themselves."

BIOGRAPHICAL AND CRITICAL SOURCES:

books

Greider, William, The Education of David Stockman and Other Americans, Dutton (New York, NY), 1982.

periodicals

Across the Board, June, 1997, Thomas Naylor, review of One World, Ready or Not: The Manic Logic of Global Capitalism, p. 58; September-October, 2003, A. J. Vogl, "Taking on Capitalism" (interview), p. 33.

America, May 14, 1988, David Jones, review of Secrets of the Temple: How the Federal Reserve Runs the Country, p. 514.

American Banker, August 4, 1988, Lou Leventhal, "The Shadow Debate on the American Economy," p. 8.

Antioch Review, summer, 1997, Steve Brzezinski, review of One World, Ready or Not, p. 376.

Atlantic Monthly, February, 1982; March, 1997, Lester Thurow, review of One World, Ready or Not, p. 97.

Austin American-Statesman (Austin, TX), April 8, 1997, Matthew Miller, "Scribes Battle Nerds for Economic Common Ground," p. A11.

Australian (Sydney, Australia), December 10, 1997, Eric Jones, "Rough Trade," p. B12.

Bankers Magazine, September-October, 1988, Tom Cunningham, review of Secrets of the Temple. Bankers Monthly, March, 1988, Andrew Gray, review of Secrets of the Temple, p. 86.

Booklist, March 15, 1992, Brad Hooper, review of Who Will Tell the People?: The Betrayal of American Democracy, p. 1314; December 15, 1996, David Rouse, review of One World, Ready or Not, p. 699; August, 2003, Mary Whaley, review of The Soul of Capitalism: Opening Paths to a Moral Economy, p. 1936.

Business Ethics, fall, 2003, William Greider, "Beyond Scarcity: A New Story for American Capitalism."

Business Week, November 1, 1982, Norman Jonas, review of "The Education of David Stockman and Other Americans," p. 13; January 25, 1988, Sarah Bartlett, review of Secrets of the Temple, p. 18; June 13, 1988, Morton Reichek, review of Secrets of the Temple, p. 14; December 19, 1988, Denise Demong, review of Secrets of the Temple, p. 14; February 5, 1990, Karen Pennar, review of The Trouble with Money: A Prescription for America's Financial Fever, p. 13; May 25, 1992, Douglas Harbrecht, review of Who Will Tell the People?, p. 12; January 20, 1997, William Glasgall, review of One World, Ready or Not, p. 14; December 28, 1998, Stan Crock, review of The American Military and the Consequences of Peace, p. 18.

Capital Times (Madison, WI), April 11, 1997, "A Chilling Alarm on New Global Economy" (interview), p. 15A.

Catholic New Times, May 3, 1998, Blayne Haggart, "William Greider—In Search of Optimistic Revolutionaries," p. 14.

Challenge, May-June, 1988, Hyman Minsky, review of Secrets of the Temple, p. 58.

Chicago Tribune, January 20, 1997, section 4, p. 3.

Chicago Tribune Book World, September 5, 1982.

Christian Century, March 23, 2004, Douglas A. Hicks, review of The Soul of Capitalism, p. 24.

Christian Science Monitor, November 20, 1981, Rushworth Kidder, "The Atlantic and Stockman," p. 1; September 10, 1982, Peter Greier, review of "The Education of David Stockman and Other Americans," p. B1; July 8, 1992, Keith Henderson, review of Who Will Tell the People?, p. 19.

Columbia Journalism Review, March-April, 1988, Mark Hertsgaard, review of Secrets of the Temple, p. 52.

Commonweal, May 6, 1988, John Judis, review of Secrets of the Temple, p. 280; July 16, 2004, Eugene McCarraher, "Voodoo Economics," review of The Soul of Capitalism, p. 32.

Cross Currents, spring, 1998, M. D. Litonjua, review of One World, Ready or Not, p. 99.

Detroit News, April 13, 1982.

Ecologist, September-October, 1997, Colin Hines, review of One World, Ready or Not, p. 208.

Economist, February 6, 1988, review of Secrets of the Temple, p. 87; October 18, 1997, review of One World, Ready or Not, p. S3.

Editor and Publisher, November 28, 1981, "Greider-Stockman Meetings Were No Secret at the Post," p. 36.

Esquire, September, 2000, "The Only Reading List You'll Ever Need," p. 84.

Europe, November, 1992, Robert Bassman, review of Who Will Tell the People?, p. 47.

Europe Intelligence Wire, October 6, 2003, Vincent Boland, "The Market Must Find Its Soul."

Forbes, February 22, 1988, Ronald Bailey, review of Secrets of the Temple, p. 104.

Foreign Affairs, January-February, 1997, Walter Russell Mead, review of One World, Ready or Not, p. 146.

Fortune, February 1, 1988, Daniel Seligman, review of Secrets of the Temple, p. 108.

Globe and Mail (Toronto, Ontario, Canada), February 6, 1988; January 11, 1997, Andrew Allentuck, "Great Global Circle Game," p. D14.

Harvard Business Review, May-June, 1988, David Warsh, review of Secrets of the Temple, p. 22; January-February, 1997, Jeffrey E. Garten, review of One World, Ready or Not, p. 144.

Houston Chronicle (Houston, TX), March 9, 1997, "What Price a Global Economy?," p. 19.

Independent (London, England), September 13, 1997, Diane Coyle, "God, Mammon, and the Guardian Angels," p. 6.

Industrial and Labor Relations Review, January, 2003, Michael Gurdon, "Human Resources, Management, and Personnel," p. 363.

Institutional Investor, May, 1997, Kevin Muehring, review of One World, Ready or Not, p. 180.

International Economy, May-June, 1997, Jeff Faux, review of One World, Ready or Not, p. 30.

International Herald Tribune, January 14, 1997, Reginald Dale, "The Voices of Global Doom Are Wrong," p. 11.

Journal of Economic Issues, March, 1989, Christopher Niggle, review of Secrets of the Temple, p. 272; March, 1991, L. Randall Wray, review of The Trouble with Money, p. 271; September, 1998, Emily Northrop, review of One World, Ready or Not, p. 896.

Journal of International Affairs, fall, 1988, Martin Mayer, review of Secrets of the Temple, p. 199.

Journal of Monetary Economics, September, 1988, Thomas Havrilesky, review of Secrets of the Temple, p. 343.

Journal of Social, Political and Economic Studies, winter, 1997, Dwight Murphey, review of One World, Ready or Not, p. 497.

Kirkus Reviews, June 15, 2003, review of The Soul of Capitalism, p. 844.

Knight Ridder/Tribune Business News, September 15, 2003, Cecil Johnson, review of The Soul of Capitalism.

Library Journal, October 15, 1982, Kenneth Kister, review of "The Education of David Stockman and Other Americans," p. 1977; May 1, 1992, Karl Helicher, review of Who Will Tell the People?, p. 101; January, 1997, A. J. Sobczak, review of One World, Ready or Not, p. 115; November 15, 1998, Daniel Blewett, review of Fortress America: The American Military and the Consequences of Peace, p. 80.

Los Angeles Times Book Review, January 1, 1983, Tom Redburn, review of "The Education of David Stockman and Other Americans," p. 4; December 13, 1987, pp. 1, 12; January 29, 1989, p. 10; June 7, 1992, pp. 2, 7; December 14, 1997, Benjamin Barber, review of One World, Ready or Not, p. 6.

Money, December, 1998, "The Case for Priming the Pump" (interview), p. 36.

Multinational Monitor, May, 1997, Robert Weissman, review of One World, Ready or Not, p. 26.

Nation, January 23, 1988, Tim Metz, review of Secrets of the Temple, p. 93; May 4, 1992, "Deductible Democracy," p. 577; July 20, 1992, Lawrence Goodwyn, review of Who Will Tell the People?, p. 114; October 6, 2003, Lee Hall, "Friends of Animals," p. 19.

National Catholic Reporter, July 17, 1992, Gloria Emerson, review of Who Will Tell the People?, p. 20.

National Review, May 5, 1997, John O. McGinnis, review of One World, Ready or Not, p. 52; January 25, 1999, John Hillen, "Lonesome Dove," p. 50.

New Leader, February 8, 1988, Barry Gewen, review of Secrets of the Temple, p. 17.

New Republic, December 23, 1981, Bruce Mazlish, "The Faces of Stockman," p. 16; February 22, 1988, Robert Samuelson, review of Secrets of the Temple, p. 32; March 21, 1988, Alfred Kahn, "More Secrets of the Temple," p. 6; May 25, 1992, Alan Ehrenhalt, review of Who Will Tell the People?, p. 39.

New Statesman, March 20, 1998, Alec Cairncross, review of One World, Ready or Not, p. 55.

Newsweek, November 23, 1981, "Et tu, David Stockman?", p. 40; November 30, 1981, Meg Greenfield, "The Great American Flap Trap," p. 112; February 10, 1997, Michael Hirsh, review of One World, Ready or Not, p. 67.

New York Observer, September 22, 2003, Christopher Bray, "Fixing Capitalism Bit by Bit to Build Us All a Better World," p. 13.

New York Review of Books, October 7, 1982; June 25, 1992, Murray Kempton, review of Who Will Tell the People?, p. 49.

New York Times, November 13, 1981, Jonathan Friendly, "Post Allowed Editor to Scoop Newspaper," and "The Stockman Article: Excerpts from Atlantic," pp. 39, D17; November 13, 1981, David Stockman, "The Cat's Still Out of the Bag," pp. 30, A34; November 15, 1981, William Safire, "First Symbiosis Furor," p. E23; November 16, 1981, Anthony Lewis, "Does the Emperor Know?," pp. 21, A23; July 4, 1982, Kendall Wills, "The Education of David Stockman, Part 2," p. F17; February 26, 1985, John Corry, review of "Retreat from Beirut," p. C18; January 21, 1988, Christopher Lehmann-Haupt, review of Secrets of the Temple, pp. 21, C25; April 15, 1992, Walter Goodman, "The Betrayal of Democracy," pp. B3, C22; April 27, 1992, Christopher Lehmann-Haupt, review of Who Will Tell the People?, pp. B2, C18.

New York Times Book Review, January 17, 1988, Adam Smith, review of Secrets of the Temple, p. 7; January 14, 1990, John Taylor, review of The Trouble with Money, p. 10; May 24, 1992, Jefferson Morley, review of Who Will Tell the People?, p. 3; January 19, 1997, Matthew Miller, review of One World, Ready or Not, p. 12; November 29, 1998, James Stewart, review of Fortress America, p. 10; December 21, 2003, John Judis, "Government Isn't the Answer," p. 14.

New York Times Magazine, February 14, 1982, Diane McWhorter, "The Atlantic: In Search of a Role," p. 20.

Other Side, July-August, 2004, Scott Klinger, review of The Soul of Capitalism, p. 39.

Progressive, January, 1988, Molly Ivins, "Numbers Game," p. 39; May, 1988, James Galbraith, review of Secrets of the Temple, p. 30; December, 1992, Erwin Knoll, review of Who Will Tell the People?, p. 36; June, 1997, Eyal Press, "William Greider" (interview), p. 34; January, 1998, Matthew Rothschild, review of One World, Ready or Not, p. 41; June, 1999, William Arkin, review of Fortress America, p. 40.

Publishers Weekly, August 6, 1982, review of "The Education of David Stockman and Other Americans," p. 66; October 30, 1987, Genevieve Stuttaford, review of Secrets of the Temple, p. 60; March 30, 1992, review of Who Will Tell the People: The Betrayal of American Democracy, p. 94; October 28, 1996, review of One World, Ready or Not, p. 63; October 26, 1998, review of Fortress America, p. 57; May 19, 2003, review of The Soul of Capitalism, p. 59.

Reason, April, 1997, Brink Lindsey, review of One World, Ready or Not, p. 54.

Review of Radical Political Economics, winter, 1988, Gerald Epstein, review of Secrets of the Temple, p. 135.

Rolling Stone, August 10, 1995, P. J. O'Rourke, "P. J. Gets the Last Word," p. 40.

St. Louis Post-Dispatch, February 9, 1997, Joseph Losos, "Fearing World without Boundaries," p. 5C.

San Francisco Chronicle, January 26, 1997, Sanford Horwitt, "Global Warning," p. 1; December 24, 1997, Molly Ivins, "A Cure for What Ails Global Economy?," p. A17.

Seattle Post-Intelligencer, January 29, 1997, Bruce Ramsey, "Cheap Labor No Threat to World Economy," p. B4; February 29, 2004, Mike Whitney, "Howard Dean," p. F3.

Seattle Times (Seattle, WA), January 31, 1999, Lance Dickie, "Putting U.S. Defense in Hot Seat," p. M8; September 19, 2003, James Galbraith, "Searching for Morality in Capitalism," p. H38.

Sierra Magazine, January-February, 2004, Paul Rauber, interview with William Greider.

Sojourners, September-October, 1997, Thad Williamson, review of One World, Ready or Not, p. 62.

Star Tribune (Minneapolis, MN), September 7, 2001, Eric Black, "Media Watch," p. 16A.

Time, November 23, 1981, Janice Castro, "Hoist by His Own Quotes," p. 78; November 23, 1981, Ed Magnuson, "A Visit to the Woodshed," p. 10; November 30, 1981, Thomas Griffith, "Adversaries or Willing Victims," p. 80; December 7, 1987, Richard Hornik, "Money Gods," p. 80; May 11, 1992, Walter Shapiro, review of Who Will Tell the People: The Betrayal of American Democracy, p. 62; March 24, 1997, Richard Hornik, review of One World, Ready or Not, p. 99.

Time Canada, April 7, 1996, review of One World, Ready or Not, p. 59.

Times Literary Supplement, November 21, 1997, Oliver Letwin, review of One World, Ready or Not, p. 29.

Tribune Books (Chicago, IL), January 31, 1988, pp. 3, 11.

U.S. News and World Report, February 1, 1988, Susan Dentzer, "Paul Volcker's Biggest Critic," p. 46.

Utne Reader, March-April, 1989, Brad Edmondson, "The Deep, Dark Secret of Our Government," p. 14.

Wall Street Journal, January 6, 1988, Paul Weaver, review of Secrets of the Temple, pp. 15, 13; July 20, 1992, Suzanne Garment, review of Who Will Tell the People: The Betrayal of American Democracy, pp. A8, A12; January 17, 1997, section A, p. 11.

Washington Monthly, January, 1988, Alan Murray, review of Secrets of the Temple, p. 51; July-August, 1992, Todd Gitlin, review of Who Will Tell the People: The Betrayal of American Democracy, p. 54; April, 1997, David Ignatius, review of One World, Ready or Not, p. 42.

Washington Post, March 1, 1982; May 19, 1982; February 26, 1985, Tom Shales, review of "Retreat from Beirut," p. C10; January 17, 1988, Paul Blustein, "Backers Angrily Defend Volcker against Criticism in New Book," p. H7; January 21, 1988; March 18, 1988, Haynes Johnson, "Dead silence," p. A2; April 14, 1992, Mary McGrory, "Tracking the Font of Voter Rage," p. A2.

Washington Post Book World, October 3, 1982; January 3, 1988, p. 1; January 29, 1989, p. 12; February 25, 1990, p. 3; May 17, 1992, pp. 4-5.

Whole Earth, summer, 2000, Richard Moore, "Recommended Reading," p. 54.

Wilson Quarterly, autumn, 1998, Andrew Bacevich, review of Fortress America, p. 107.

World and I, December, 2003, John Attarian, review of The Soul of Capitalism, p. 216.

World Policy Journal, spring, 1999, David Rieff, review of Fortress America, p. 93.

online

Salon.com, http://www.salon.com/ (September 16, 2003), Andrew Leonard, "Desperately Seeking Capitalism's Soul."

Slate, http://slate.msn.com/id/2087957/ (September 4, 2003), Timothy Noah, "David Stockman, Working Class Hero."

TomPaine.com, http://www.tompaine.com/ (August 22, 2003), William Greider, "Parliament of Dreams."

William Greider Web site, http://www.williamgreider.com (September 23, 2004).*

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