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Gay, Kathlyn 1930-

GAY, Kathlyn 1930-

PERSONAL: Born March 4, 1930, in Zion, IL; daughter of Kenneth Charles (an accountant) and Beatrice (Anderson) McGarrahan; married Arthur L. Gay (an elementary school teacher), August 28, 1948; children: Martin, Douglas, Karen. Education: Attended Northern Illinois University, two years. Politics: Democrat.

ADDRESSES: Home—11633 Bayonet Ln., New Port Richey, FL 34654. E-mail—[email protected]

CAREER: Church World Service, Christian Rural Overseas Program (CROP), editor and public relations writer in Elkhart, IN, and New York, NY, 1962-66; Juhl Advertising Agency, Elkhart, IN, publicity and public relations writer, 1966; freelance writer, 1966—; partner in rental business, 1971—. Community relations director for Americana Healthcare Center, 1976-79; instructor in creative writing, Elkhart Area Career Center, beginning 1970. Past writer for political campaigns, including Mayor Richard J. Daley's political campaign in Chicago, IL, 1967. Writing consultant to Lyons & Carnahan, 1969-70, Ginn & Co., 1971, and Science Research Associates, 1972-73.

MEMBER: Authors Guild, Society of Children's Book Writers and Illustrators.

AWARDS, HONORS: Honorable mention, Writer's Digest short story contest, 1962; first prize in literary section, Northern Indiana Arts Festival, 1965, for oneact play; "Outstanding Book" selection, National Council for the Social Studies and National Science Teachers' Association, 1983, for Acid Rain, and 1988, for Silent Killers: Radon and Other Hazards; "one of the most important books on education" selection, National Education Association convention, 1987, for Crisis in Education: Will the United States Be Ready for the Year 2000?; Notable Books for Young People selection, American Library Association (ALA), 1993, for Global Garbage: Exporting Trash and Toxic Waste; Books for the Teen Age list, New York Public Library, 1994, for Church and State: Government and Religion in the United States and Caretakers of the Earth, 1995, for Getting Your Message Across and Pregancy: Private Decisions, Public Debates, and 1996, for Keep the Buttered Side Up: Food Superstitions from around the World; ALA recommended list for YA books on terrorism, 2000, for Silent Death: The Threat of Chemical and Biological Terrorism.

WRITINGS:

Girl Pilot, Messner (New York, NY), 1966.

Money Isn't Everything: The Story of Economics at Work, Delacorte (New York, NY), 1967.

Meet the Mayor of Your City, Hawthorn (New York, NY), 1967.

Meet Your Governor, Hawthorn (New York, NY), 1968.

Beth Speaks Out, Messner (New York, NY), 1968.

Careers in Social Service, Messner (New York, NY), 1969.

Where the People Are: Cities and Their Future, Delacorte (New York, NY), 1969.

The Germans Helped Build America, Messner (New York, NY), 1971.

Proud Heritage on Parade, Contemporary Drama Service (Colorado Springs, CO), 1972.

Core English: English for Speakers of Other Languages, Ginn (Lexington, MA), 1972.

A Family Is for Living: The Changing Family in a Changing World, Delacorte (New York, NY), 1972.

Our Working World, Science Research Associates (Palo Alto, CA), 1973.

Body Talk, Scribner (New York, NY), 1974.

Be a Smart Shopper, Messner (New York, NY), 1974.

(With Ben E. Barnes) The River Flows Backward, Ashley Books (Port Washington, NY), 1975.

What's in a Name?, Elkhart Community Schools (Elkhart, IN), 1975.

Care and Share: Teenagers and Volunteerism, Messner (New York, NY), 1977.

Look Mom! No Words!, Houghton (Boston, MA), 1977.

(With son Martin Gay and Marla Gay) Get Hooked on Vegetables, Messner (New York, NY), 1978.

(Coauthor) English around the World, Scott, Foresman (Glenview, IL), 1979.

(With Martin Gay) Eating What Grows Naturally, illustrated by Brian Byrn, And Books (South Bend, IN), 1980.

(With Ben E. Barnes) Your Fight Has Just Begun, Messner (New York, NY), 1980.

(With Ben E. Barnes) Beginner's Guide to Better Boxing, McKay (New York, NY), 1980.

(Coauthor) I Like English, Scott, Foresman (Glenview, IL), 1981.

English for a Changing World, Scott, Foresman (Glenview, IL), 1981.

Boxes and More Boxes, Houghton (Boston, MA), 1981.

(Coauthor) Family Living, Prentice-Hall (Englewood Cliffs, NJ), 1982, 3rd edition, 1988.

Junkyards, Enslow Publishers (Hillside, NJ), 1982.

Acid Rain, F. Watts (New York, NY), 1983.

Cities under Stress, F. Watts (New York, NY), 1985.

The Greenhouse Effect, F. Watts (New York, NY), 1986.

Ergonomics: Making Products and Places Fit People, Enslow Publishers (Hillside, NJ), 1986.

Crisis in Education: Will the United States Be Ready for the Year 2000?, F. Watts (New York, NY), 1986.

The Rainbow Effect: Interracial Families, F. Watts (New York, NY), 1987.

Changing Families: Meeting Today's Challenges, Enslow Publishers (Hillside, NJ), 1988.

Science in Ancient Greece, F. Watts (New York, NY), 1988.

Silent Killers: Radon and Other Hazards, F. Watts (New York, NY), 1988.

Bigotry, Enslow Publishers (Hillside, NJ), 1989.

Ozone, F. Watts (New York, NY), 1989.

Adoption and Foster Care, Enslow Publishers (Hill-side, NJ), 1990.

They Don't Wash Their Socks!: Sports Superstitions, Walker (New York, NY), 1990.

Water Pollution, F. Watts (New York, NY), 1990.

Cleaning Nature Naturally, Walker (New York, NY), 1991.

Air Pollution, F. Watts (New York, NY), 1991.

Garbage and Recycling, Enslow Publishers (Hillside, NJ), 1991.

Day Care: Looking for Answers, Enslow Publishers (Hillside, NJ), 1992.

Church and State: Government and Religion in the United States, Millbrook (Brookfield, CT), 1992.

Global Garbage: Exporting Trash and Toxic Waste, F. Watts (New York, NY), 1992.

Caution! This May Be an Advertisement: Teen Guide to Advertising, F. Watts (New York, NY), 1992.

Caretakers of the Earth, Enslow Publishers (Hillside, NJ), 1993.

The Right to Die: Public Controversy, Private Matter, Millbrook (Brookfield, CT), 1993.

Getting Your Message Across, Macmillan (New York, NY), 1993.

Breast Implants: Making Safe Choices, Macmillan (New York, NY), 1993.

Pregnancy: Private Decisions, Public Debates, F. Watts (New York, NY), 1994.

Rainforests of the World, ABC-Clio Press (Santa Barbara, CA), 1994.

The New Power of Women in Politics, Enslow Publishers (Hillside, NJ), 1994.

Pollution and the Powerless: The Environmental Justice Movement, F. Watts (New York, NY), 1994.

I Am Who I Am: Speaking Out about Multiracial Identity, F. Watts (New York, NY), 1995.

Keep the Buttered Side Up: Food Superstitions from around the World, Walker (New York, NY), 1995.

(With Martin Gay) Encyclopedia of North American Eating and Drinking Traditions, Customs, and Rituals, ABC-Clio Press (Santa Barbara, CA), 1995.

Rights and Respect: What You Need to Know about Gender Bias and Sexual Harassment, Millbrook (Brookfield, CT), 1995.

(With Martin Gay) Heroes of Conscience: A Biographical Dictionary, ABC-CLIO (Santa Barbara, CA) 1996.

Saving the Environment: Debating the Costs, F. Watts (New York, NY), 1996.

(With son Douglas Gay) The Not-So-Minor Leagues, Millbrook (Brookfield, CT), 1996.

(With Martin Gay) The Information Superhighway, Holt (New York, NY), 1996.

Communes and Cults, Twenty-First Century Books (New York, NY), 1997.

Militias: Armed and Dangerous, Enslow Publishers (Hillside, NJ), 1997.

Neo-Nazis: A Growing Threat, Enslow Publishers (Hillside, NJ), 1997.

(With Martin Gay) Emma Goldman, Lucent Books (San Diego, CA), 1997.

(Coauthor) After the Shooting Stops: The Aftermath of War, Twenty-First Century Books (New York, NY), 1998.

Who's Running the Nation?: How Corporate Power Threatens Democracy, F. Watts (New York, NY), 1998.

Child Labor: A Global Crisis, Millbrook (Brookfield, CT), 1998.

(With Martin Gay) Encyclopedia of Political Anarchy, ABC-CLIO (Santa Barbara, CA), 1999.

Leaving Cuba: From Operation Pedro Pan to Elian, Twenty-First Century Books (New York, NY), 2000.

Silent Death: The Threat of Chemical and Biological Terrorism, Twenty-First Century Books (New York, NY), 2001.

(With Christine Whittington) Body Marks: Tattooing, Piercing, and Scarification, Millbrook (Brookfield, CT), 2002.

Epilepsy: The Ultimate Teen Guide, Scarecrow (Lanham, MD), 2002.

The Encyclopedia of Women's Health Issues, Oryx (Phoenix, AZ), 2002.

Eating Disorders: Anorexia, Bulimia, and Binge Eating, Enslow (Hillside, NJ), 2003.

Cultural Diversity: Conflicts and Challenges, Scarecrow (Lanham, MD), 2003.

Abortion: Understanding the Debate, Enslow (Hill-side, NJ), 2004.

Death and Dying A-Z, Greenhaven (San Diego, CA), 2004.

Volunteering: The Ultimate Teen Guide, Scarecrow (Lanham, MD), in press.

Also author of teaching manuals, including activities and stories for numerous publishers. Contributor to books, including Spotlights, Houghton (Boston, MA), 1986; and Currents, Houghton (Boston, MA), 1986. Contributor to Childcraft Annual, Field Enterprises (Chicago, IL), 1969, The New Book of Knowledge, and Collier's Encyclopedia. Contributor to "Young America Basic Reading" series, Lyons & Carnahan (Chicago, IL). Contributor of articles and short stories to periodicals, including Women in Business, Michiana Magazine, Better Homes and Gardens, Red Cross Journal, Success, Highlights for Children, and Popular Medicine.

"VOICES FROM THE PAST" SERIES; WITH MARTIN GAY

World War I, Twenty-First Century Books (New York, NY), 1995.

World War II, Twenty-First Century Books (New York, NY), 1995.

War of 1812, Twenty-First Century Books (New York, NY), 1995.

Spanish-American War, Twenty-First Century Books (New York, NY), 1995.

Revolutionary War, Twenty-First Century Books (New York, NY), 1995.

Civil War, Twenty-First Century Books (New York, NY), 1995.

Korean War, Twenty-First Century Books (New York, NY), 1996.

Persian Gulf War, Twenty-First Century Books (New York, NY), 1996.

Vietnam War, Twenty-First Century Books (New York, NY), 1996.

WORK IN PROGRESS: American Radicals, American Landmarks, and What Americans Believe.

SIDELIGHTS: With over a hundred books to her credit, Kathlyn Gay has established herself as a prolific writer of nonfiction information books for teens and juvenile readers. Gay has explored topics including environmental issues, politics, military history, sports, manufacturing, multiculturalism, and pressing social concerns in books that are held up as examples of what a good informational title should be. Gay's works are "insightful, well-researched, and intellectually stimulating," according to Booklist's Stephanie Zvirin. Her books have also been called "relevant [and] engrossing," by Booklist's Roger Leslie, and "factual, well-organized, straightforward, and readable," by Diane P. Tuccillo in School Library Journal. Neither does Gay steer away from "thorny contemporary issues," noted Chris Sherman in Booklist. "Writing, for me," Gay once told CA, "has become a way of life, and I could not imagine trying to function as an individual without exercising this form of communication."

Born in Zion, Illinois, in 1930, Gay was brought up in a community controlled by a church group that originated at the turn of the twentieth century. "'Outsiders' were seldom welcome in this community," Gay once noted in CA, "and it was here I learned the real dangers of 'exclusiveness' and isolation. Even at nine and ten years old I felt there was little opportunity for growth in a closed community. What is good and right and productive in life takes many forms, not just one. Each of us may come from a different place and still arrive at the same goal or end." Such an upbringing instilled in Gay a fervent belief in a pluralistic society and a respect for individual difference, concerns reflected in many of her nonfiction titles. Gay started writing when she was ten, publishing articles for her elementary school newspaper. As she grew up, she more and more began to define herself by such writing, dreaming of a career in journalism or perhaps advertising.

Attending Northern Illinois University, she met her future husband, Arthur L. Gay; they married in 1948. Gay's husband was an educator, and the family lived variously in Barrington, Illinois, Ventura, California, and then for thirty-six years in Elkhart, Indiana. Gay did not realize her youthful dreams of becoming a professional writer until her daughter was born in 1957. In fact, the expectant mother penned her first article, which was subsequently published in a travel magazine, in the hospital the very day her daughter was born. The subsequent fifteen dollars she earned for the article convinced Gay that she could build a career in writing. Working part time in a variety of jobs and raising a family, Gay still found time to turn out articles on her portable typewriter. More articles followed, and then some textbooks and teaching materials for the educational market. From there, she branched out to writing books on a wide range of topics of interest for young readers. Soon Gay had built a thriving career as a nonfiction writer for young adults and juvenile readers, collaborating with her husband on some titles, or with her children—as they grew older—on others.

Gay has written numerous books on environmental topics, beginning with the award-winning 1983 Acid Rain, a discussion of one of the hottest ecological issues of the 1980s. Gay explicates the impacts of such end results of pollution in a book that has "short chapters with clear explanations," according to Paula J. Lacey in Voice of Youth Advocates. She does the same about the build-up of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere in The Greenhouse Effect, "a balanced, well-written book on a difficult and important technology-induced problem of our time," as Indira Nair noted in a review for Appraisal. Similarly, School Library Journal critic Meryl Silverstein found the same book to be "a thorough overview and introduction to a complex and difficult problem." The threat posed by a hole in the ozone layer is examined in Ozone, an "outstanding introduction to a complex problem, enhanced by lucid writing," according to a critic for Kirkus Reviews. Toxic dangers are explored in Silent Killers: Radon and Other Hazards.

Gay also shows how insects and microorganisms can be used in Cleaning Nature Naturally, "impressively researched" with a "carefully balanced perspective," as a contributor for Kirkus Reviews described the book. "This is a thorough look at an expanding technology with a few sparks of wit here and there," added Paula J. Lacey in Voice of Youth Advocates. Various forms of pollution are dealt with in subsequent titles. Water Pollution tackles that issue head on, examining both causes and effects. Charles Harmon, writing in Booklist, felt that "Gay's discussion of protective and cleanup measures merit special praise." The author also provides a "well-documented, thought-provoking study" in her Air Pollution, according to Mary Romano Marks in Booklist. A critic for Kirkus Reviews had similar praise, calling the book a "comprehensive, upto-date, well-balanced look at our industrialized society's poisoning of the air we breathe." Addressing the issue of recycling, Gay penned Garbage and Recycling, a "short book," according to Herbert J. Mason in Science Books and Films, "but the author has made every word count." More environmental solutions are proposed in Saving the Environment: Debating the Costs, while in Rainforests of the World, Gay presents a reference handbook covering that unique ecosystem.

Gay tackles controversial social issues in numerous other titles. Her 1989 Bigotry is "a comprehensive and well-documented account of the complex problems of bigotry and prejudice," according to Sylvia V. Meisner, writing in School Library Journal. Not only racial, but also gender, sexual, and economic prejudices are explored in this "worthwhile tool for research papers," as Meisner further noted. One form of such bias is further examined in Rights and Respect: What You Need to Know about Gender Bias and Sexual Harassment, a book written in "an anecdotal style that is very readable," according to Chris Sherman in Booklist. Gay used her own personal experiences growing up in a closed society in Communes and Cults, a discussion of both religious and secular societies. Looking at groups from the Branch Davidians of Waco, Texas, to Jim Jones's People's Temple, she provides "a valuable title, clearly written, and informative," thought Libby K. White in School Library Journal. In Neo-Nazis: A Growing Threat, she looks at far-right cults in "a scary, informative introduction to the subject," according to Booklist's Jean Franklin.

Turning to social issues with more of a personal concern, Gay authored Pregnancy: Private Decisions, Public Debates, examining the controversy around abortion. Lois McCulley, writing in School Library Journal, felt that "superior writing and a well-organized, thoughtful presentation mark this volume." Likewise, a contributor for Kirkus Reviews found the book to be a "well-informed overview," as well as "lively." For Booklist's Stephanie Zvirin, Gay "does her customarily balanced, well-documented job" in this title. Euthanasia is the subject of The Right to Die: Pubic Controversy, Private Matter, a book presented "in lucid, interesting, and easily understood language," as noted by School Library Journal's Kathryn Havris, who also felt that "this book is a great place to start for information" for the continuing debate over the right to die. A writer for Kirkus Reviews also praised Gay's "fully-documented, well-integrated" approach to the subject. Education comes under the Gay lens in Crisis in Education: Will the United States Be Ready for the Year 2000?, an outline of the basic issues shaping education and educational reform in the mid-1980s. A Booklist commentator lauded Gay for approaching the topic "without jargon or preaching" and for discussing "many hotly debated issues with considerable fairness."

Other nonfiction titles from Gay deal with multiculturalism. I Am Who I Am: Speaking Out about Multiracial Identity earned a starred Booklist review from Stephanie Zvirin, who called it "positive, supporting, and informative," and won similar praise from Brenda Moses in Voice of Youth Advocates, as "an excellent source for information." Changing Families: Meeting Today's Challenges and The Rainbow Effect: Interracial Families are two titles that deal with the ever-developing and altering nature of families in the United States. Rosie Peasley, writing in School Library Journal, found Changing Families "an excellent presentation," and both "accepting and hopeful" of new family arrangements.

Political issues and government are examined in some of Gay's titles. The separation of government and religion is analyzed in Church and State: Government and Religion in the United States, a book that evidences "Gay's even-handedness," according to Dem Polacheck in Voice of Youth Advocates. "Gay has performed admirably in presenting the issues," Polacheck further commented. Cities under Stress takes a look at the state of the urban centers in America, while The New Power of Women in Politics focuses on women in politics from Abigail Adams to today. "Gay treats her subjects as working leaders in public life," declared Mary Harris Veeder in a Booklist review, "not as oddities." And in the 1999 Who's Running the Nation?: How Corporate Power Threatens Democracy, Gay looks at the corporate threat to democracy in "an insightful analysis of current social trends," according to Jonathan Betz-Zall, writing in School Library Journal. From the robber barons of the nineteenth century to today's corporate welfare, the history of such abuses of power is presented in a "welldocumented account," as Betz-Zall further described the title.

Lighter in tone are sports books, such as They Don't Wash Their Socks!: Sports Superstitions, which Voice of Youth Advocates critic Sari Feldman felt was a "fine hilo title" about an "entertaining" topic. Amateur boxing is the subject of Your Fight Has Just Begun, "an enthusiastic initiation to a subject about which little has been written specifically for teens," according to a reviewer for Booklist. Richard Luzer, writing in School Library Journal, also felt that Gay and her coauthor, Ben E. Barnes, "do an excellent job of capturing a very special American subculture." Minor league baseball takes center stage in The Not-So-Minor Leagues, written with one of her sons, Douglas Gay. Debbie Carton, reviewing the title in Booklist, thought it would make an "excellent addition to basic baseball collections."

Gay displays her wide range of researching and writing abilities in many other titles dealing with military history and wars in which Americans have fought.

Writing in the "Voices from the Past" series in collaboration with her son Martin, the authors offer brief overviews of wars, including causes, battles, outcomes, and ample quotations from people involved in the conflicts, tracing the history of American warfare from the Revolutionary War to the Persian Gulf War over two hundred years later. Reviewing Civil War, World War I, and World War II in School Library Journal, Rosalyn Pierini commented upon the "serviceably written texts . . . interwoven with excerpts from letters, diaries, and newspaper accounts." Hazel Rochman, in a Booklist review of World War I and World War II, similarly praised the personal quoted material that "enlivens the facts." Rochman also predicted that "the military drama will draw readers." Reviewing Vietnam War and Korean War in Booklist, Susan Dove Lempke applauded how Gay "evenhandedly discusses the divisiveness surrounding the conflict" of Vietnam and also how she "shows the atrocities committed by all sides." Roxy Ekstrom, writing in Voice of Youth Advocates, felt that Vietnam War "presents a concise, comprehensive, clear and unbiased overview." Barbara Jo McKee, reviewing Persian Gulf War in Voice of Youth Advocates, wrote that Gay "describes in detail" the events of that conflict in an economical manner. For McKee, the volume could be "very useful" not only at the middle school level, but also for "high school students who are reluctant readers or who want a concise version of the war." Judith L. Miller, reviewing the same title in School Library Journal, called it "a clearly written, objective overview of the military conflict."

Gay takes a different look at war in her Silent Death: The Threat of Chemical and Biological Warfare, an investigation of the use and proliferation of such weaponry. Booklist's Roger Leslie thought the book's "content" was "so staggering that the author need only present information in a straightforward manner to rouse the reader." Similarly, Ann G. Brouse, writing in School Library Journal, felt that while "this information is alarming, the presentation is not alarmist." After the Shooting Stops: The Aftermath of War is another view on war, or rather on its aftermath in social, political, and technological terms. Allison Trent Bernstein called this book a "solid addition" in a School Library Journal review. Booklist's Roger Leslie felt that the book offers "an easy-to-read, information-packed history lesson."

In other titles, Gay continues to demonstrate her versatility. Science in Ancient Greece takes a look at scientific achievements in that ancient culture, while Leaving Cuba: From Operation Pedro Pan to Elian traces the experiences of children who have fled Castro's Cuba. Reviewing the latter title, Nell Beram, writing in Horn Book Guide, commended Gay's "rich narrative." Voice of Youth Advocates critic Delia A. Culberson likewise lauded this "well-documented book [that] looks at the various aspects of the Cuban diaspora and its impact on Cubans and their American hosts."

Among the author's popular and well-respected encyclopedias and reference guides are Encyclopedia of Women's Health Issues, and Encyclopedia of Political Anarchy. Gay offers two hundred alphabetical entries in the first title, including controversies in women's health, concise biographies, and entries on sexual abuse, abortion, dieting, obesity and a wealth of other topics. "The book's approach is evenhanded," noted a Booklist reviewer, who also felt that "the reading level should be comfortable for both general adults and teen audiences." Barbara M. Bibel, writing in Library Journal, called the same title "a good starting point for research on gender issues in healthcare policy." In her Encyclopedia of Political Anarchy, written in collaboration with son Martin, Gay attempts to clear up what she feels is one of the most misunderstood political movements in history. Her one hundred and seventy entries include short biographical profiles on people from Mary Wollstonecraft to Emma Goldman and Noam Chomsky, and on topics from the Haymarket affair to the Black Panthers. The first English-language encyclopedia of anarchism, the work is "well-written," according to Stephen L. Hupp in Library Journal, and a "very useful curriculum-support tool," as a Booklist contributor noted. Douglas Wooley, reviewing the book in School Library Journal, found the articles "cogent [and] concise."

Gay is expanding on this work with another title on radicalism and dissent in the United States. This involves, as Gay told CA, "both peaceful and violent protests that have been part of the American scene since colonial times and have had much to do with shaping and changing the nation." Gay further explained, "Unfortunately, I believe that dissent is being stifled today and that those who do not accept the established point of view are being ostracized, harassed, or assaulted. It will be a challenge to present profiles of American radicals who represent various movements and ideologies—individuals who have challenged the state, the church, political parties, the military, and big industry. I hope to cover such historical periods as the American Revolution; the abolitionists and early women's rights and utopianism movements; anarchism, socialism, and labor reform movements; civil rights and peace movements; and social and environmental justice."

"Through the written word," Gay told CA, "I feel I have been able to share with young people and adults some of the observations and impressions I have had on what it means to be a person, a productive human being. So many different conditions and factors shape each one of us as individuals that I am often amazed we are able to understand one another at all. Happily, though, there are many experiences in life that are common to all of us and a writer can draw on these in stories and articles to help readers see, hear, feel with real or imaginary people."

BIOGRAPHICAL AND CRITICAL SOURCES:

PERIODICALS

Appraisal, winter, 1987, Indira Nair, review of The Greenhouse Effect, pp. 28-29; summer, 1995, Carol Bilge, review of Pollution and the Powerless: The Environmental Justice Movement, pp. 23-24.

Booklist, June 1, 1980, review of Your Fight Has Just Begun, p. 1418; December 1, 1986, review of Crisis in Education: Will the United States Be Ready for the Year 2000?, p. 567; January 1, 1991, Charles Harmon, review of Water Pollution, p. 919; December 1, 1991, Mary Romano Marks, review of Air Pollution, p. 686; August, 1994, Stephanie Zvirin, review of Pregnancy: Private Decisions, Public Debates, p. 2036; February 15, 1995, Mary Harris Veeder, review of The New Power of Women in Politics, p. 1068; June 1, 1995, Stephanie Zvirin, review of I Am Who I Am: Speaking Out about Multiracial Identity, p. 1756; October 1, 1995, Chris Sherman, review of Rights and Respect: What You Need to Know about Gender Bias and Sexual Harassment, p. 300; December 15, 1995, Hazel Rochman, review of World War I and World War II, p. 700; May 15, 1996, Debbie Carton, review of The Not-So-Minor Leagues, p. 1577; July, 1996, Sally Estes, review of The Information Superhighway, p. 1816; September 1, 1996, Frances Bradburn, review of Saving the Environment: Debating the Costs, p. 71; November 15, 1996, Susan Dove Lempke, review of Korean War and Vietnam War, p. 582; April 1, 1997, review of Heroes of Conscience: A Biographical Dictionary, pp. 1356-1357; September 1, 1997, Jean Franklin, review of Neo-Nazis: A Growing Threat, p. 70, Chris Sherman, review of Communes and Cults, p. 70; August, 1998, Roger Leslie, review of After the Shooting Stops: The Aftermath of War, p. 1982; December 1, 1998, Lauren Peterson, review of Science in Ancient Greece, p. 678; July, 1999, review of Encyclopedia of Political Anarchy, p. 1973; March 1, 2001, Roger Leslie, review of Leaving Cuba: From Operation Pedro Pan to Elian, p. 1270; April 1, 2001, Roger Leslie, review of Silent Death: The Threat of Chemical and Biological Terrorism, p. 1458; August, 2002, review of Encyclopedia of Women's Health Issues, pp. 2010-2011; December 1, 2002, Roger Leslie, review of Body Marks: Tattooing, Piercing, and Scarification, p. 654.

Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books, February, 1992, Deborah Stevenson, review of Caution! This May Be an Advertisement: Teen Guide to Advertising, p. 155; June, 1993, Deborah Stevenson, review of Breast Implants: Making Safe Choices, pp. 314-315; October, 1996, Susan S. Verner, review of Saving the Environment, p. 59.

Choice, April, 1997, W. Arant, review of Encyclopedia of North American Eating and Drinking Traditions, Customs and Rituals, pp. 1307-1308; July-August, 2002, J. M. Coggan, review of Encyclopedia of Women's Health Issues, p. 1938.

Five Owls, May, 1993, Mary Lou Burket, review of Caution! This May Be an Advertisement, p. 108.

Horn Book Guide, fall, 1993, Barbara Barstow, review of Breast Implants, p. 352; spring, 1997, Carolyn Shute, review of Saving the Environment, p. 97; spring, 1999, Peter D. Sieruta, review of Who's Running the Nation?: How Corporate Power Threatens Democracy, p. 89; spring, 2001, Nell Beram, review of Leaving Cuba, p. 96; fall, 2001, Peter D. Sieruta, review of Silent Death, p. 337.

Kirkus Reviews, June 15, 1978, review of Get Hooked on Vegetables, p. 641; August 1, 1986, review of Ergonomics: Making Products and Places Fit People, p. 1211; October 1, 1989, review of Ozone, p. 1474; November 1, 1991, review of Air Pollution, pp. 1401-1402, review of Cleaning Nature Naturally, p. 1402; August 1, 1993, review of The Right to Die: Public Controversy, Private Matter, p. 1000; June 1, 1994, review of Pregnancy, p. 774.

Library Journal, June 1, 1990, review of Ozone, p. 88; July, 1999, Stephen L. Hupp, review of Encyclopedia of Political Anarchy, pp. 80-81; December, 2002, Barbara M. Bibel, review of Encyclopedia of Women's Health Issues, p. 106.

Reference and User Services Quarterly, summer, 2003, Jennifer M. Boudreaux, review of The Encyclopedia of Women's Health Issues, p. 364.

School Library Journal, January, 1981, Richard Luzer, review of Your Fight Has Just Begun, p. 69; August, 1986, Meryl Silverstein, review of The Greenhouse Effect, p. 100; March, 1988, Rosie Peasley, review of Changing Families: Meeting Today's Challenges, p. 219; December, 1988, Diane P. Tuccillo, review of Silent Killers: Radon and Other Hazards, p. 126; September, 1989, Sylvia V. Meisner, review of Bigotry, p. 280; September, 1993, Kathryn Havris, review of The Right to Die, pp. 254-255; July, 1994, Lois McCulley, review of Pregnancy, p. 123; February, 1996, Rosalyn Pierini, review of Civil War, World War I, and World War II, p. 106; February, 1997, Judith L. Miller, review of Persian Gulf War, p. 115; July, 1997, Libby K. White, review of Communes and Cults, pp. 102-103; September, 1998, Allison Trent Bernstein, review of After the Shooting Stops, p. 216; March, 1999, Jonathan Betz-Zall, review of Who's Running the Nation?, p. 221; November, 1999, Douglas Wooley, review of Encyclopedia of Political Anarchy, p. 78; January, 2001, Sylvia V. Meisner, review of Leaving Cuba, p. 144; April, 2001, Ann G. Brouse, review of Silent Death, p. 158; October, 2002, Elaine Baran Black, review of Body Marks, p. 182.

Science Books and Films, January, 1987, Thomas T. Liao, review of Ergonomics, p. 172; May, 1989, Wilton T. Adams, review of Silent Killers, p. 296; October, 1991, Herbert J. Mason, review of Garbage and Recycling, p. 204; September, 2001, David W. Lillie, review of Silent Death, pp. 209-210.

Voice of Youth Advocates, April, 1984, Paula J. Lacey, review of Acid Rain, p. 46; August, 1990, Sari Feldman, review of They Don't Wash Their Socks!: Sports Superstitions, p. 174; February, 1992, Paula Lacey, review of Cleaning Nature Naturally, p. 393; February, 1993, Dem Polacheck, review of Church and State: Government and Religion in the United States, p. 368; October, 1995, Brenda Moses, review of I Am Who I Am, p. 247; February, 1997, Roxy Ekstrom, review of Vietnam War, pp. 345-346; June, 1997, Barbara Jo McKee, review of Persian Gulf War, p. 130; June, 2001, Delia A. Culberson, review of Leaving Cuba, pp. 140, 142.

ONLINE

AuthorsDen.com,http://www.authorsden.com/ (May 25, 2003), "Kathlyn Gay."

Link-On: The Book Web of Kathlyn Gay,http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/kathy/ (May 26, 2003).*

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