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Ricarda, Ana (c. 1925–)

Ricarda, Ana (c. 1925–)

American Spanish dancer and choreographer. Born c. 1925 in San Francisco, CA; trained with La Argentina and La Argentinita.

Trained in ballet as well as Spanish dance technique; performed with Markova-Dolin concert troupe in NY; appeared at Metropolitan Opera in Carmen; performed numerous Fanny Elssler Spanish dance specialties, including La Cachucha and Pas Espagnol; joined Grand Ballet du Marquis de Cuevas (1949), where she served as dancer and choreographer, and created such well-known works as Del Amor y de la Muerte (1953), La Tertulia (1952), and Bolero 1830 (1953); taught in London at Royal Ballet and staged numerous dances for that company. Works of choreography include Dona Ines de Castro (1952), Bolero 1830 (1953), Serenade (1955), La Chanson de l'Eternelle Tristesse (1957) and La Esponta (1971).

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