Foley, Edna (1878–1943)

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Foley, Edna (1878–1943)

American nurse. Born Edna Lois Foley, Dec 17, 1878, in Hartford, Connecticut; died Aug 4, 1943; dau. of William R. and Matilda (Baker) Foley; graduate of Smith College (1901) and Hartford Hospital Training School for Nurses (1904).

Became a Chicago Visiting Nurses Association (VNA) superintendent (1912); studied and integrated nurse practices from around the world and elevated VNA's reputation; succeeded Mary Gardner as chief nurse of the American Red Cross Tuberculosis Commission for Italy (1919); chaired meeting that led to establishment of the National Organization for Public Health Nursing (1912) and served as its 1st vice president and as one of its presidents (1920–21); appointed director of the National Society for Study and Prevention of Tuberculosis (1916); appointed director of Chicago Tuberculosis Institute (1931); advocated increased opportunities for African-American nurses. Wrote the popular Visiting Nurse Manual (1914).