Skip to main content

Cha, Theresa Hak Kyung (1951–1982)

Cha, Theresa Hak Kyung (1951–1982)

Korean-American performance artist and essayist. Name variations: Theresa Cha. Born Cha Hak Kyung, Mar 4, 1951, in Pusan, Korea; murdered by a stranger, Nov 5, 1982, age 31, in New York, NY; dau. of Cha Hyung Sang and Huo Hyung Soon (both teachers); attended University of San Francisco; University of California at Berkeley, BA in comparative literature, 1973, BA in art, 1975, MFA in art, 1977; also attended Centre d'Etudes Americaine du Cinema in Paris, 1976.

Performance art pieces include Barren Cave Mute (1974), A Secret Spill (1974), A Blé Wall (1975), Aveugle Voix (1975), Life Mixing (1975), Vampyr (1976), and Reveille Dans La Brume (1977); also published mail art series Audience Distant Relatives (1978), edited collection of essays Apparatus? Cinematographic Apparatus: Selected Writings (1980), and wrote the influential Dictée (1982); granted an NEA fellowship (1981) to shoot black-and-white film in Korea. Received Stuart McKenna Nelson Award for the Photographic Medium (1977).

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Cha, Theresa Hak Kyung (1951–1982)." Dictionary of Women Worldwide: 25,000 Women Through the Ages. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Sep. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Cha, Theresa Hak Kyung (1951–1982)." Dictionary of Women Worldwide: 25,000 Women Through the Ages. . Encyclopedia.com. (September 23, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/women/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/cha-theresa-hak-kyung-1951-1982

"Cha, Theresa Hak Kyung (1951–1982)." Dictionary of Women Worldwide: 25,000 Women Through the Ages. . Retrieved September 23, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/women/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/cha-theresa-hak-kyung-1951-1982

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.