Bauer, Catherine Krouse (1905–1964)

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Bauer, Catherine Krouse (1905–1964)

American housing expert. Name variations: Catherine Bauer Wurster. Born Catherine Krouse Bauer, May 11, 1905, in Elizabeth, New Jersey; died Nov 22, 1964, in Berkeley, California; dau. of Jacob Louise Bauer and Alberta Louise (Krouse) Bauer; m. William Wilson Wurster (architect), Aug 13, 1940; children: Sarah Louise Wurster, known as Sadie (b. 1945).

Authored articles on European architecture while living in Paris (late 1920s); met and was influenced by Lewis Mumford (late 1920s); appointed executive secretary of Regional Planning Association in NYC (1931); wrote Modern Housing (1934); as executive secretary of Labor Housing Conference, helped create around 75 labor housing committees, leading to passage of Wagner-Steagall Housing Act (1937); served as director of research and information at US Housing Authority (1937–40); was Rosenberg Professor of Public Social Services at University of California at Berkeley (1940–43); worked at University of California at Berkeley (1950–64), as professor of city and regional planning and associate dean of College of Environmental Design; authored what became foundation for the President's Commission on National Goals, "Framework for an Urban Society" (Goals for Americans, 1960); co-founded National Association of Housing Officials; was vice president of National Public Housing Conference and honorary member of American Institute of Planners; urged better public housing and coordination of housing, transportation and land control policies.

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Bauer, Catherine Krouse (1905–1964)

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