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surface

sur·face / ˈsərfis/ • n. 1. the outside part or uppermost layer of something (often used when describing its texture, form, or extent): the earth's surface poor road surfaces. ∎  the level top of something: roll out the dough on a floured surface. ∎  (also surface area) the area of such an outer part or uppermost layer: the surface area of a cube. ∎  [in sing.] the upper limit of a body of liquid: fish floating on the surface of the water. ∎  [in sing.] what is apparent on a casual view or consideration of someone or something, esp. as distinct from feelings or qualities that are not immediately obvious: Tom was a womanizer, but on the surface he remained respectable| [as adj.] we need to go beyond surface appearances. 2. Geom. a set of points that has length and breadth but no thickness. • adj. of, relating to, or occurring on the upper or outer part of something: surface workers at the copper mines. ∎  denoting ships that travel on the surface of the water as distinct from submarines: the surface fleet. ∎  carried by or denoting transportation by sea or overland as contrasted with by air: surface mail. • v. 1. [intr.] rise or come up to the surface of the water or the ground: he surfaced from his dive. ∎  come to people's attention; become apparent: the quarrel first surfaced two years ago. ∎ inf. (of a person) appear after having been asleep: it was almost noon before Anthony surfaced. 2. [tr.] (usu. be surfaced) provide (something, esp. a road) with a particular upper or outer layer: a small path surfaced with terra-cotta tiles. DERIVATIVES: sur·faced adj. [often in comb.] a smooth-surfaced cylinder. sur·fac·er n.

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surface

surface XVII. — F., f. SUR-2 + face FACE.

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surface

surfaceabyss, amiss, bis, bliss, Chris, Diss, hiss, kiss, Majlis, miss, piss, reminisce, sis, Swiss, this, vis •dais •Powys, prowess •loess, Lois •Lewes, lewis •abbess • ibis •Anubis, pubis •cannabis • arabis • duchess • purchase •caddis, Gladys •Candice •Sardis, Tardis •vendace • Charybdis •bodice, goddess •demigoddess • Aldiss • jaundice •de profundis • prejudice • hendiadys •cowardice • stewardess • preface •Memphis • aphis • edifice • benefice •orifice • artifice • office •surface, surface-to-surface •undersurface • haggis • aegis •burgess •clerkess, Theodorákis •Colchis

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