Skip to main content
Select Source:

Tour de France

Tour de France Premier professional road cycling race in Europe. Raced over three weeks from the end of June, it travels across all types of terrain in a series of timed stages. It mostly circles France, occasionally venturing into neighbouring countries, and ends in Paris. The first Tour was in 1903.

Year

Winner

Country

1989

Greg Le Mond

USA

1990

Greg Le Mond

USA

1991

Miguel Induráin

Spain

1992

Miguel Induráin

Spain

1993

Miguel Induráin

Spain

1994

Miguel Induráin

Spain

1995

Miguel Induráin

Spain

1996

Bjarne Riis

Denmark

1997

Jan Ullrich

Germany

1998

Marco Pantini

Italy

1999

Lance Armstrong

USA

2000

Lance Armstrong

USA

2001

Lance Armstrong

USA

2002

Lance Armstrong

USA

2003

Lance Armstrong

USA


Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Tour de France." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 May. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Tour de France." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. (May 23, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/tour-de-france

"Tour de France." World Encyclopedia. . Retrieved May 23, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/tour-de-france

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

Tour de France

Tour de France a French race for professional cyclists held annually since 1903, covering approximately 4,800 km (3,000 miles) of roads in about three weeks, renowned for its mountain stages. The overall leader after each stage wears the famous yellow leader's jersey.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Tour de France." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 May. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Tour de France." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. (May 23, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/tour-de-france

"Tour de France." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Retrieved May 23, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/tour-de-france

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.