Skip to main content
Select Source:

montmorillonite

montmorillonite An important clay mineral of the approximate composition {Al4[Si3AlO10]2(OH)4}2−.nH2O with some K+, Na+, or Ca+ ions also present; it belongs to the 2:1 group of phyllosilicates (sheet silicates) and the montmorillonite or smectite group includes bentonite; most members of this group are designated expansive clays by engineers, because they can accommodate many water molecules into their structure and they all possess an overall negative charge; sp. gr. variable but 2.0–2.7; hardness 2; monoclinic; white to grey with tints of blue, pink, pink-red, and green; dull lustre; usually occurs in massive, microcrystalline aggregates of very fine, scale-like crystals, but in soils as a hydrous aluminosilicate clay mineral with a layer-lattice structure (two sheets of tetrahedral silicon crystals enclosing a sheet of octahedral aluminium crystals) that expands when water enters between layers, thus making a soil material, typically with variable water content, subject to swelling and contraction; found very extensively, it results from the decomposition of volcanic ashes in marine basins, and also occurs in the weathering crust of basic igneous rocks, e.g. diabases, basalts, gabbros, and peridotites. It is used extensively as an absorbant, for refining out suspended matter, in the textile and chemical industries.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"montmorillonite." A Dictionary of Earth Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 May. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"montmorillonite." A Dictionary of Earth Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. (May 24, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/montmorillonite

"montmorillonite." A Dictionary of Earth Sciences. . Retrieved May 24, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/montmorillonite

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

montmorillonite

montmorillonite See fuller's earth.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"montmorillonite." A Dictionary of Food and Nutrition. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 May. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"montmorillonite." A Dictionary of Food and Nutrition. . Encyclopedia.com. (May 24, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/montmorillonite

"montmorillonite." A Dictionary of Food and Nutrition. . Retrieved May 24, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/montmorillonite

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.