fullers earth

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fuller's earth
1. A clay consisting mainly of expanding smectites such as montmorillonite used industrially for its absorptive properties.

2. Capitalized, Fuller's Earth is the stratigraphic name of a Jurassic clay formation outcropping in southern Britain.

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fuller's earth, mineral substance characterized by the property of absorbing basic colors and removing them from oils. It is composed mainly of alumina, silica, iron oxides, lime, magnesia, and water, in extremely variable proportions, and is generally classified as a sedimentary clay. In color it may be whitish, buff, brown, green, olive, or blue. It is semiplastic or nonplastic and may or may not disintegrate easily in water. It was originally used in the fulling of wool to remove oil and grease but is now used chiefly in bleaching and clarifying petroleum and secondarily in refining edible oils. Fuller's earth is mined in many parts of the United States, Georgia and Florida being the leading producers, and in England near Reigate, Nutfield, and Bath. Before it can be used, it has to be crushed and dried.

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fuller's earth
1. A clay consisting mainly of expanding clay minerals such as montmorillonite, which is used industrially for its absorptive properties.

2. Capitalized, Fuller's Earth is the stratigraphic name of a Jurassic clay formation outcropping in southern Britain.

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fuller's earth Clay-like substance containing over 50% silica. Once used for fulling (removing oil and grease from wool), it is now used to bleach petroleum and refine vegetable oils.

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ful·ler's earth • n. a type of clay used in fulling cloth and as an adsorbent.

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fuller's earth An adsorbent clay, calcium montmorillonite, or bentonite; adsorbs both by physical means and by ion exchange. Used to bleach oils, clarify liquids, and absorb grease.