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Shaping Social Policy: Governments, Organizations, the International Community and the Individual

1 Shaping Social Policy: Governments, Organizations, the International Community and the Individual

Introduction to Shaping Social Policy: Governments, Organizations, the International Community and the Individual …3

PRIMARY SOURCES

How Not to Help Our Poorer Brothers … 4
Theodore Roosevelt, 1897

The Danger Threatening Representative Government … 8
Robert M. La Follette Sr., 1897

Theodore Roosevelt on the Role of the State in Its Citizen's Lives … 10
Theodore Roosevelt, 1900

Theodore Roosevelt on Manhood and Statehood … 13
Theodore Roosevelt, 1901

Civic Cooperation … 17
Jane Addams, 1912

The Diffusion of Property Ownership … 21
Herbert Hoover, 1927

Justice as Fairness: Political not Metaphysical …23
John Rawls, 1985

Habitat for Humanity … 26
Lenny Ignelzi, 1990

Reparations: A National Apology … 29
Anonymous, 1990

Fourth World Conference on Women … 32
United Nations, 1995

United Nations Millennium Declaration … 35
United Nations, 2000

Establishment of White House Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives … 39
George W. Bush, 2001

UNICEF … 41
Jim Hollander, 2002

To Walk the Earth in Safety … 44
U.S. Department of State; Bureau of Political-Military Affairs, 2002

The Millennium Declaration to End Hunger in America … 47
Brandeis University, The Heller Center for Social Policy and Management: Institute on Assets and Social Policy—Center on Hunger and Poverty, 2003

Model Colonia … 51
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, 2004

International Red Cross … 53
Andrea Booher, 2005

Katrina: Our System for Fixing Broken Lives is Broken … 56
Brian A. Gallagher, 2005

Google Subpoena Roils the Web … 59
Hiawatha Bray, 2006

More Companies Ending Promises for Retirement… 62
Mary Williams Walsh, 2006

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"Shaping Social Policy: Governments, Organizations, the International Community and the Individual." Social Policy: Essential Primary Sources. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 15, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/social-sciences/applied-and-social-sciences-magazines/shaping-social-policy-governments-organizations-international-community-and-individual

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