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mail

mail1 / māl/ • n. letters and packages conveyed by the postal system. ∎  (also the mails) the postal system: you can order by mail the check is in the mail | [as adj.] a mail truck. ∎  [in sing.] a single delivery or collection of mail: the new magazine that came in the mail today. ∎ Comput. electronic mail. ∎ dated a vehicle, such as a train, carrying mail. ∎ archaic a bag of letters to be conveyed by the postal system. • v. [tr.] send (a letter or package) using the postal system: if you will mail the coupon, we'll send you a free trial package. ∎ Comput. send (someone) electronic mail. DERIVATIVES: mail·a·ble adj. mail2 • n. hist. armor made of metal rings or plates, joined together flexibly. ∎  the protective shell or scales of certain animals. • v. [tr.] clothe or cover with mail: [as adj.] (mailed) a mailed gauntlet. PHRASES: the mailed fist the use of physical force to maintain control or impose one's will.

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"mail." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Feb. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"mail." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (February 17, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/mail-0

"mail." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved February 17, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/mail-0

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mail

mail3 (now Sc. and U.S.) pack, bag XIII; bag of letters for conveyance by post; person or vehicle conveying this XVII. ME. male — OF. male (mod. malle bag, trunk), of Gmc. orig.
Hence vb. (orig. U.S.). send by post. XIX.

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"mail." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Feb. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"mail." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (February 17, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/mail-3

"mail." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved February 17, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/mail-3

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mail

mail2 (now Sc.) payment, tax, tribute. north. repr. of late OE. māl — ON. mál speech, agreement = OE. mæl speech; in sense the Eng. word corr. rather to ON. mǣli stipulation, stipulated pay.

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mail

mail1 ring or plate of armour; armour composed of rings XIV; breast feathers of a hawk XV. — (O)F. maille mesh:- L. macula spot, mesh.

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mail

mail: see postal service.

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"mail." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Feb. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"mail." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (February 17, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/mail

"mail." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved February 17, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/mail

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mail

mail See electronic mail.

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"mail." A Dictionary of Computing. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Feb. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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mail

mailail, ale, assail, avail, bail, bale, bewail, brail, Braille, chain mail, countervail, curtail, dale, downscale, drail, dwale, entail, exhale, fail, faille, flail, frail, Gael, Gail, gale, Grail, grisaille, hail, hale, impale, jail, kale, mail, male, nail, nonpareil, outsail, pail, pale, quail, rail, sail, sale, sangrail, scale, shale, snail, stale, swale, tail, tale, they'll, trail, upscale, vail, vale, veil, wail, wale, whale, Yale •Passchendaele • Airedale •Wensleydale • Clydesdale •Chippendale • Coverdale • Abigail •galingale • martingale • nightingale •farthingale • Windscale • timescale •blackmail • airmail •email, female •Ishmael • voicemail • vermeil

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"mail." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved February 17, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/mail

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