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transfer

trans·fer • v. / transˈfər; ˈtransfər/ (-ferred , -fer·ring ) [tr.] move (someone or something) from one place to another: he would have to transfer money to his own account. ∎  move or cause to move to another group, occupation, or service: [intr.] she transferred to the Physics Department | [tr.] employees have been transferred to the installation team. ∎  [intr.] enroll in a different school or college: Ron transferred to the University of Idaho. ∎  (in professional sports) move or cause to move to another team: [intr.] he transferred to the Dodgers | [tr.] when a player is transferred to the minors by a major league club. ∎  [intr.] change to another place, route, or means of transportation during a journey: John advised him to transfer from Rome airport to the railroad station. ∎  make over the possession of (property, a right, or a responsibility) to someone else. ∎  convey (a drawing or design) from one surface to another. ∎  [usu. as adj.] (transferred) change (the sense of a word or phrase) by extension or metaphor: a transferred use of the Old English noun. ∎  redirect (a telephone call) to another line or extension. • n. / ˈtransfər/ an act of moving something or someone to another place: a transfer of wealth to the poorer nations | a patient had died after transfer from the County Hospital to St. Peter's. ∎  a change of employment, typically within an organization or field: she was going to ask her boss for a transfer to the city. ∎ Brit. an act of selling or moving an athlete to another team: his transfer from Rangers cost £800,000. ∎  a student who has enrolled in a different school or college: [as adj.] the impact of transfer students on enrollment figures. ∎  a conveyance of property, esp. stocks, from one person to another. ∎  a small colored picture or design on paper that can be transferred to another surface by being pressed or heated: T-shirts with iron-on transfers. ∎  a ticket allowing a passenger to change from one public transportation vehicle to another as part of a single journey. DERIVATIVES: trans·fer·ee / ˌtransfəˈrē/ n. trans·fer·or / transˈfərər; ˈtransfərər/ n. ( chiefly Law ) trans·fer·rer n.

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Transfer

TRANSFER

To remove or convey from one place or person to another. The removal of a case from one court to another court within the same system where it might have been instituted. An act of the parties, or of the law, by which the title to property is conveyed from one person to another.

Transfer encompasses the sale and every other method, direct or indirect, of (1) disposing of property or an interest therein or possession thereof; or (2) fixing a lien (a charge against property to secure a debt) absolutely or conditionally, voluntarily or involuntarily, with or without judicial proceedings, in the form of a conveyance, sale, payment, pledge, lien, mortgage, gift, or otherwise. The term transfer has a general meaning and can include the act of giving property by will.

Transfer is the comprehensive term used by the uniform commercial code (UCC)—a body of law adopted by the states that governs mercantile transactions—to describe the act that passes an interest in an instrument (a written legal document) from one person to another.

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transfer

transfer convey from place to place XIV; make over by legal process XVI; convey (a design) from one surface to another XIX. — L. transferre (or F. transférer), f. TRANS- + ferre BEAR2.
Hence transfer sb., transference XVII.

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