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Chavín de Huántar

Chavín de Huántar (chävēn´ dā wän´tär), archaeological site in the northeastern highlands of Peru, near the headwaters of the Marañon River. It flourished between c.900 BC and 200 BC The site features two monumental temples and intricate stone carvings depicting snarling human deities and a variety of animals, including caimans, jaguars, snakes, birds of prey, and mythical beasts. The site also features residential architecture covering c.18.5 acres (7.5 hectares). The term "Chavín" (or "Chavinoid" ), used as an adjective, refers to the intricate art style present at this site, which eventually spread throughout much of central and N Peru. Once considered one of the earliest large-scale ceremonial centers of the central Andes, archaeologists now realize that monumental architecture actually emerged considerably earlier in other parts of Peru. The spread of the Chavín style in media such as metallurgy, textiles, and ceramics dates to the last phase at the site (c.400–200 BC), when Chavín de Huántar was undoubtedly the most prestigious religious and urban center in Peru.

See J. A. Mason, Ancient Civilizations of Peru (1961); J. H. Rowe, Chavín Art: An Inquiry into Its Form and Meaning (1962); E. P. Benson, ed., Dumbarton Oaks Conference on Chavín, 1968 (1971); C. Kano, Origins of the Chavín Culture (1979); R. L. Burger, Chavín and the Origins of Andean Civilization (1992).

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Chavín

Chavín a civilization that flourished in Peru c.1000–200 bc, uniting a large part of the country's coastal region in a common culture. It is named after the town and temple complex of Chavín de Huantar in the northern highlands, where the civilization was centred.

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