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Servant

582. Servant (See also Butler.)

  1. Abigail helpmeet of King David; traditional name for hand-maiden. [O.T.: I Samuel 25]
  2. Albert popular servants name: assistant, manservant, page-boy. [Br. Lit.: Loving; By The Pricking of My Thumbs; A Damsel in Distress ]
  3. Brighella prototype of interfering servant; meddles and gossips. [Ital. Drama: Walsh Classical, 62]
  4. Despina her stratagems control and resolve the plot. [Ital. Opera: Mozart, Cosi fan tutte, Scholes, 259]
  5. Figaro valet who outwits everyone by his cunning. [Fr. Lit.: Marriage of Figaro ]
  6. Friday young Indian rescued by Crusoe and kept as servant and companion. [Br. Lit.: Robinson Crusoe ]
  7. Ganymede mortal lad, taken by Zeus to be cupbearer to the gods. [Gk. Myth.: Howe, 106]
  8. golem automaton homunculus performs duties not permissible for Jews. [Jew. Legend: Jobes, 674]
  9. Hazel meddling maid in the Baxter house. [TV and Comics: Terrace, I, 343]
  10. Hebe cupbearer to the gods; succeeded by Ganymede. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 117]
  11. Ithamore purchased by Barabas to betray Governor of Malta. [Br. Drama: The Jew of Malta ]
  12. Jeeves stereotypical English valet of Wodehouse stories. [Brit. Lit.: NCE, 2997]
  13. Lichas Hercules attendant; unknowingly delivers poisoned robe to him. [Rom. Lit.: Metamorphoses ]
  14. Notburga, St. Bavarian patroness of domestics; beneficent, though poor. [Christian Hagiog.: Attwater, 257]
  15. Passepartout Phileas Foggs rash valet. [Fr. Lit.: Around the World in Eighty Days ]
  16. Thing Addams family servant; a disembodied right hand. [TV: The Addams Family in Terrace, I, 29]
  17. Xanthias carries Bacchuss heavy bundles. [Gk. Lit.: The Frogs ]
  18. Zita, St. devout and generous domestic; patron saint. [Christian Hagiog.: Attwater, 348]

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servant

serv·ant / ˈsərvənt/ • n. a person who performs duties for others, esp. a person employed in a house on domestic duties or as a personal attendant. ∎  a person employed in the service of a government. See also civil servant, public servant. ∎  a devoted and helpful follower or supporter: a tireless servant of God. DERIVATIVES: serv·ant·hood / -ˌhoŏd/ n.

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servant

servant is thy servant a dog? a biblical saying, with reference to 2 Kings 8:13, in which the Syrian Hazael protests against Elisha's prophecy that he will do harm to Israel.
servant of the servants of God a translation of Latin servus servorum Dei, is a title of the Pope, first assumed by Gregory the Great.

See also fire is a good servant.

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servant

servant personal or domestic attendant XIII; one under obligation to work for (and obey) another XIV. — OF. servant m. and fem. (now only fem. -ante), sb. use of prp. of servir SERVE; see -ANT and cf. SERGEANT.

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servant

servantabeyant, mayn't •ambient, circumambient •gradient, irradiant, radiant •expedient, ingredient, mediant, obedient •valiant • salient • resilient • emollient •defoliant • ebullient • suppliant •convenient, intervenient, lenient, prevenient •sapient •impercipient, incipient, percipient, recipient •recreant • variant • miscreant •Orient • nutrient •esurient, luxuriant, parturient, prurient •nescient, prescient •omniscient • insouciant • renunciant •officiant • negotiant • deviant •subservient • transient •affiant, Bryant, client, compliant, defiant, giant, pliant, reliant •buoyant, clairvoyant, flamboyant •fluent, pursuant, truant •affluent • effluent • mellifluent •confluent • circumfluent • congruent •issuant • continuant • constituent •lambent • absorbent •incumbent, recumbent •couchant • merchant • hadn't •ardent, guardant, regardant •pedant •appendant, ascendant, attendant, codependent, defendant, descendant, descendent, intendant, interdependent, pendant, pendent, splendent, superintendent, transcendent •antecedent, decedent, needn't, precedent •didn't • diffident • confident •accident • dissident •coincident, incident •oxidant • evident •improvident, provident •president, resident •strident, trident •co-respondent, correspondent, despondent, fondant, respondent •accordant, concordant, discordant, mordant, mordent •rodent •imprudent, jurisprudent, prudent, student •couldn't, shouldn't, wouldn't •impudent •abundant, redundant •decadent • verdant • infant • elephant •triumphant • sycophant • elegant •fumigant • congregant • litigant •termagant • arrogant • extravagant •pageant •cotangent, plangent, tangent •argent, Sargent, sergeant •agent • newsagent • regent •astringent, contingent, stringent •indigent • intelligent • negligent •diligent • intransigent • exigent •cogent •effulgent, fulgent, indulgent •pungent •convergent, detergent, divergent, emergent, insurgent, resurgent, urgent •bacchant • peccant • vacant • piquant •predicant • mendicant • significant •applicant • supplicant • communicant •lubricant • desiccant • intoxicant •gallant, talent •appellant, propellant, propellent, repellent, water-repellent •resemblant •assailant, inhalant •sealant • sibilant • jubilant •flagellant • vigilant • pestilent •silent •Solent, volant •coolant • virulent • purulent •ambulant, somnambulant •coagulant • crapulent • flatulent •feculent • esculent • petulant •stimulant • flocculent • opulent •postulant • fraudulent • corpulent •undulant •succulent, truculent •turbulent • violent • redolent •indolent • somnolent • excellent •insolent • nonchalant •benevolent, malevolent, prevalent •ambivalent, equivalent •garment • clement • segment •claimant, clamant, payment, raiment •ailment •figment, pigment •fitment • aliment • element •oddment •dormant, informant •moment • adamant • stagnant •lieutenant, pennant, subtenant, tenant •pregnant, regnant •remnant • complainant •benignant, indignant, malignant •recombinant • contaminant •eminent •discriminant, imminent •dominant, prominent •illuminant, ruminant •determinant • abstinent •continent, subcontinent •appurtenant, impertinent, pertinent •revenant •component, deponent, exponent, opponent, proponent •oppugnant, repugnant •immanent •impermanent, permanent •dissonant • consonant • alternant •covenant • resonant • rampant •discrepant • flippant • participant •occupant • serpent •apparent, arrant, transparent •Arendt •aberrant, deterrent, errant, inherent, knight-errant •entrant •declarant, parent •grandparent • step-parent •godparent •flagrant, fragrant, vagrant •registrant • celebrant • emigrant •immigrant • ministrant • aspirant •antiperspirant • recalcitrant •integrant • tyrant • vibrant • hydrant •migrant, transmigrant •abhorrent, torrent, warrant •quadrant • figurant • obscurant •blackcurrant, concurrent, currant, current, occurrent, redcurrant •white currant • cross-current •undercurrent •adherent, coherent, sederunt •exuberant, protuberant •reverberant • denaturant •preponderant • deodorant •different, vociferant •belligerent, refrigerant •accelerant • tolerant • cormorant •itinerant • ignorant • cooperant •expectorant • adulterant •irreverent, reverent •nascent, passant •absent •accent, relaxant •acquiescent, adolescent, albescent, Besant, coalescent, confessant, convalescent, crescent, depressant, effervescent, erubescent, evanescent, excrescent, flavescent, fluorescent, immunosuppressant, incandescent, incessant, iridescent, juvenescent, lactescent, liquescent, luminescent, nigrescent, obsolescent, opalescent, pearlescent, phosphorescent, pubescent, putrescent, quiescent, suppressant, tumescent, turgescent, virescent, viridescent •adjacent, complacent, obeisant •decent, recent •impuissant, reminiscent •Vincent • puissant •beneficent, maleficent •magnificent, munificent •Millicent • concupiscent • reticent •docent •lucent, translucent •discussant, mustn't •innocent •conversant, versant •consentient, sentient, trenchant •impatient, patient •ancient • outpatient •coefficient, deficient, efficient, proficient, sufficient •quotient • patent •interactant, reactant •disinfectant, expectant, protectant •repentant • acceptant •contestant, decongestant •sextant •blatant, latent •intermittent •assistant, coexistent, consistent, distant, equidistant, existent, insistent, persistent, resistant, subsistent, water-resistant •instant •cohabitant, habitant •exorbitant • militant • concomitant •impenitent, penitent •palpitant • crepitant • precipitant •competent, omnicompetent •irritant • incapacitant • Protestant •hesitant • visitant • mightn't • octant •remontant • constant •important, oughtn't •accountant • potent •mutant, pollutant •adjutant • executant • disputant •reluctant •consultant, exultant, resultant •combatant • omnipotent • impotent •inadvertent •Havant, haven't, savant, savante •advent •irrelevant, relevant •pursuivant • solvent • convent •adjuvant •fervent, observant, servant •manservant • maidservant •frequent, sequent •delinquent • consequent •subsequent • unguent • eloquent •grandiloquent, magniloquent •brilliant • poignant • hasn't •bezant, omnipresent, peasant, pheasant, pleasant, present •complaisant • malfeasant • isn't •cognizant • wasn't • recusant •doesn't

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