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Veleda (ca. 70 C.E.)

Veleda (ca. 70 C.E.)

A prophetess among the ancient Germans, of whom the historian Tacitus stated:

"She exercises a great authority, for women have been held here from the most ancient times to be prophetic, and, by excessive superstition, as divine. The fame of Veleda stood on the very highest elevation, for she foretold to the Germans a prosperous issue, but to the legions their destruction! Veleda dwelt upon a high tower, whence messengers were dispatched bearing her oracular counsels to those who sought them; but she herself was rarely seen, and none was allowed to approach her. Cercalis is said to have secretly begged her to let the Romans have better success in war. In the reign of the Emperor Vespa-sian she was honored as a goddess."

Veleda predicted the success of Claudius Civilis in the Batavian revolt against Rome (69-70 C.E.) and the fall of the Roman Empire.

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