Skip to main content
Select Source:

cantilever

cantilever (kăn´təlēvər), beam supported rigidly at one end to carry a load along the free arm or at the free end. A slanting beam fixed at the base is often used to support the free end, as in a common bracket. The springboard is a simple cantilever beam, and the cantilever design is often used for canopies, balconies, sidewalks outside the trusses of bridges, and large cranes such as those used in shipyards. By the use of cantilever trusses, obstructing columns are eliminated in theaters. The cantilever principle is one of the methods that may be used in constructing a bridge.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"cantilever." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 14 Dec. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"cantilever." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 14, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/cantilever

"cantilever." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved December 14, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/cantilever

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

cantilever

can·ti·le·ver / ˈkantlˌēvər; -ˌevər/ • n. a long projecting beam or girder fixed at only one end, used chiefly in bridge construction. ∎  a long bracket or beam projecting from a wall to support a balcony, cornice, or similar structure. • v. [tr.] [usu. as adj.] (cantilevered) support by a cantilever or cantilevers: a cantilevered deck. ∎  [intr.] project as or like a cantilever: a conveyor cantilevered out over the river.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"cantilever." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 14 Dec. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"cantilever." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 14, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/cantilever-0

"cantilever." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved December 14, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/cantilever-0

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

cantilever

cantilever. Horizontal member projecting from a wall, etc., without supports at any point in its entire projection, capable of sustaining loads, and prevented from falling by means of a heavy dead-weight at the other end to the projection, i.e. on the opposite side of its fulcrum. Any bracket, corbel, modillion, or mutule carrying a canopy, cornice, or eaves (for example) is essentially a cantilever.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"cantilever." A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. . Encyclopedia.com. 14 Dec. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"cantilever." A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 14, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/cantilever

"cantilever." A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. . Retrieved December 14, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/cantilever

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

Cantilever

Cantilever

A theory of the physical action of ectoplasm during the phenomenon of telekinesis, or the movement of objects without contact or other physical means. The theory was developed by the psychical investigator Dr. W. J. Crawford, who attempted to measure the movement of ectoplasm during his investigations of the Goligher Circle in Belfast, Ireland, between 1917 and 1920.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Cantilever." Encyclopedia of Occultism and Parapsychology. . Encyclopedia.com. 14 Dec. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Cantilever." Encyclopedia of Occultism and Parapsychology. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 14, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/science/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/cantilever-0

"Cantilever." Encyclopedia of Occultism and Parapsychology. . Retrieved December 14, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/science/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/cantilever-0

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

cantilever

cantilever bracket of stone, etc. XVII; projecting support in bridge-building XIX. Earliest forms cantlapper, candilever; of unkn. orig.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"cantilever." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 14 Dec. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"cantilever." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 14, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/cantilever-1

"cantilever." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved December 14, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/cantilever-1

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

cantilever

cantilevercadaver, slaver •halva, salver, salvor •balaclava, Bratislava, carver, cassava, Costa Brava, guava, Java, kava, larva, lava, palaver •woodcarver •clever, endeavour (US endeavor), ever, forever, however, howsoever, never, never-never, sever, Trevor, whatever, whatsoever, whenever, whensoever, wheresoever, wherever, whichever, whichsoever, whoever, whomever, whomsoever, whosoever •delver, elver •Denver •Ava, caver, craver, deva, engraver, enslaver, favour (US favor), flavour (US flavor), graver, haver, laver, paver, quaver, raver, saver, savour (US savor), shaver, vena cava, waiver, waver •lifesaver • semiquaver •achiever, beaver, believer, cleaver, deceiver, diva, Eva, fever, Geneva, griever, heaver, leaver, lever, Neva, perceiver, receiver, reiver, reliever, retriever, Shiva, underachiever, viva, weaver, weever •cantilever

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"cantilever." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 14 Dec. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"cantilever." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 14, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/cantilever

"cantilever." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved December 14, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/cantilever

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

Cantilever

Cantilever

A cantilever, also called a fixed-end beam, is a beam supported only at one end. A cantilevered beam cannot rotate in any direction, and so creates a solid support. The cantilever is one of the three basic structural methods, the other two being post-and-beam construction and arch construction.

Cantilevers did not become widely feasible in architecture until the invention of steel and its widespread adoption in construction, because the combined strength of steel and cement is needed to create an effective cantilever. A building using cantilevers has an internal skeleton from which the walls hang like curtains. Unlike more traditional building methods, where the walls are used as load-bearing supports for the ceilings, here they are dividers of space. This allows the interior of the building to be designed almost arbitrarily, for utility, whim, or both. The most famous architect to use the cantilever system was Frank Lloyd Wright (18671959). He first used it in the 1906 construction of the Robie House in Chicago. With the use of steel and concrete, Wright was able to extend the roof 20 ft (6 m) beyond its support. With the cantilever and Wrights belief in the use of the nature in which the building resided, an entire new school of architecture was created, called the Prairie School.

Before cantilevers were used in buildings, they were used to create bridges. The first cantilever bridge was built in the late 1800s by Heinrich Gerber in Germany. He based his ideas on ancient Chinese bridges which, much earlier, used the concept of the cantilever. By using the cantilever, bridges would no longer need supports in their middles and, thus, could span deep ravines or rivers. In addition, bridges could be built across extremely wide bodies of water, or valleys, because fewer supports are needed, and the supports which are used can be further apart. Thus, the incorporation of steel, cement, and cantilevers changed the world of architecture and civil engineering.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Cantilever." The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. . Encyclopedia.com. 14 Dec. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Cantilever." The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 14, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/science/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/cantilever

"Cantilever." The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. . Retrieved December 14, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/science/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/cantilever

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

Cantilever

Cantilever

A cantilever, also called a fixed end beam, is a beam supported only at one end. The beam cannot rotate in any direction; thus it creates a solid support. The cantilever is considered the third of the three great structural methods, the other two being post-and-beam construction and arch construction. The cantilever thrusts down which is different from the thrust of an arch which is outward against its supports.

Cantilevers did not become popular in architecture until the invention of steel and its widespread adoption in construction, because the combined strength of steel and cement is needed to create an effective cantilever system. A building using cantilevers has an internal skeleton, from which the walls hang very much like curtains. Unlike more traditional building methods where the walls are used as support for the ceiling and walls, here they are dividers of space . This allows the interior of the building to be designed for purpose and creative architecture, rather than on where columns and other structural supports must be. The most famous architect to use the cantilever system was Frank Lloyd Wright. He first used it in the 1906 construction of the Robie House in Chicago. With the use of steel and concrete , Wright was able to extend the roof 20 ft (6 m) beyond its support. With the cantilever and Wright's belief in the use of the nature in which the building resided, an entire new school of architecture was created called the Prairie School.

Before cantilevers were used in buildings, they were used to create bridges . The first cantilever bridge was built in the late 1800s by Heinrich Gerber in Germany. He based his ideas on ancient Chinese bridges which, much earlier, used the concept of the cantilever. By using the cantilever, bridges would no longer need supports in their middles and, thus, could span deep ravines or rivers . In addition, bridges could be built across extremely wide bodies of water , or valleys, because fewer supports are needed, and the supports which are used can be further apart. Thus, the incorporation of steel, cement, and cantilevers changed the world of architecture and civil engineering .

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Cantilever." The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. . Encyclopedia.com. 14 Dec. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Cantilever." The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. . Encyclopedia.com. (December 14, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/science/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/cantilever-1

"Cantilever." The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. . Retrieved December 14, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/science/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/cantilever-1

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.