Skip to main content
Select Source:

impression

im·pres·sion / imˈpreshən/ • n. 1. an idea, feeling, or opinion about something or someone, esp. one formed without conscious thought or on the basis of little evidence: his first impressions of Manchester were very positive they give the impression that all is sweetness and light. ∎  an effect produced on someone: her courtesy and quick wit had made a good impression. ∎  a difference made by the action or presence of someone or something: the floor was too dirty for the mop to make much impression. 2. an imitation of a person or thing, esp. one done to entertain: he did an impression of Frank Sinatra. ∎  a graphic or pictorial representation of someone or something: the police have issued an artist's impression of the attacker. 3. a mark impressed on a surface by something: the impression of his body on the leaves. ∎  Dentistry a negative copy of the teeth or mouth made by pressing them into a soft substance. 4. the printing of a number of copies of a book, periodical, or picture for issue at one time. ∎  a particular printed version of a book or other publication, esp. one reprinted from existing type, plates, or film with no or only minor alteration.Compare with edition. ∎  a print taken from an engraving. 5. an instance of a pop-up or other Web advertisement being seen on computer users' monitors: Nielsen/NetRatings reported Web publishers served 7.3 billion pop-up ad impressions. PHRASES: under the impression that believing, mistakenly or on the basis of little evidence, that something is the case: he was under the impression that they had become friends.DERIVATIVES: im·pres·sion·al / -shənl/ adj.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"impression." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 19 Nov. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"impression." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 19, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/impression

"impression." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved November 19, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/impression

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

impression

impression (im-presh-ŏn) n. (in dentistry) a mould made of the teeth and surrounding soft tissues or of a toothless jaw. An impression is used in the construction of orthodontic appliances, restorations, and dentures.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"impression." A Dictionary of Nursing. . Encyclopedia.com. 19 Nov. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"impression." A Dictionary of Nursing. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 19, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/caregiving/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/impression

"impression." A Dictionary of Nursing. . Retrieved November 19, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/caregiving/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/impression

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.