Skip to main content
Select Source:

degree

de·gree / diˈgrē/ • n. 1. [in sing.] the amount, level, or extent to which something happens or is present: a degree of caution. 2. a unit of measurement of angles, one three-hundred-and-sixtieth of the circumference of a circle. (Symbol: °) 3. a stage in a scale or series, in particular: ∎  a unit in any of various scales of temperature, intensity, or hardness: water boils at 100 degrees Celsius. (Symbol: °) ∎  [in comb.] each of a set of grades (usually three) used to classify burns according to their severity. See first-degree, second-degree, third-degree. ∎  [in comb.] a legal grade of crime or offense, esp. murder: second-degree murder. ∎  Mus. a position in a musical scale, counting upward from the tonic or fundamental note: the lowered third degree of the scale. ∎  Math. the class into which an equation falls according to the highest power of unknowns or variables present: an equation of the second degree. ∎  Gram. any of the three steps on the scale of comparison of gradable adjectives and adverbs, namely positive, comparative, and superlative. ∎ archaic a thing placed like a step in a series; a tier or row. 4. an academic rank conferred by a college or university after examination or after completion of a course of study, or conferred as an honor on a distinguished person. ∎ archaic social or official rank: persons of unequal degree. ∎  a rank in an order of Freemasonry. PHRASES: by degrees a little at a time; gradually. to a degree to some extent: to a degree, it is possible to educate oneself.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"degree." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Oct. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"degree." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 23, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/degree-1

"degree." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved October 23, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/degree-1

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

DEGREE

DEGREE.
1. A grammatical category for items of language used to express relative intensity: very much, of a verb in I admire them very much; highly, of an adjective in highly intelligent; very, of an adverb in very often; big, of a noun in a big fool; dead, of a preposition in They're dead against it. Such intensifiers or words of degree are used with other words that are gradable (that is, on a scale of intensity). They may indicate a relatively high or low point: slightly, somewhat, hardly, a bit.

2. Three types of comparison applied to gradable adjectives and adverbs: to a high degree (bigger, biggest); to the same degree (as big as), and with a preceding negative (not so big as); to a lower degree (less big, least big). Non-extreme forms may be followed by comparative clauses: ‘Jeremy is taller than his parents (are)’; ‘Naomi is less tall than Ruth (is)’; ‘Doreen is as tall as Leslie (is).’ Higher-degree comparisons may be expressed by inflections (the absolute or positive degree happy, the comparative degree happier, and the superlative degree happiest) or periphrastically, in combination with more for comparatives (more happy) and most for superlatives (most happy). Monosyllabic adjectives (young, sad, small) generally take inflections, polysyllabic adjectives (beautiful) periphrastic more/most. Many disyllabic adjectives take either form: commoner/more common, commonest/most common. Most adverbs allow only periphrastic comparison (happily/more happily/most happily), but a few are suppletive: badly/worse/worst; well/better/best. See PERIPHRASIS, SUPPLETION.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"DEGREE." Concise Oxford Companion to the English Language. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Oct. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"DEGREE." Concise Oxford Companion to the English Language. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 23, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/degree

"DEGREE." Concise Oxford Companion to the English Language. . Retrieved October 23, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/degree

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

degree

degree
1. of a vertex of a graph. The number of edges incident with the vertex, i.e. that emanate from that vertex. In a directed graph, the indegree is the number of edges entering a vertex while the outdegree is the number leaving a vertex.

2. of a node in a tree. The number of children of that node, i.e. the number of subtrees rooted at that node. More correctly, this is the outdegree of the node.

3. of a tree. The maximum degree of all the nodes in the tree.

4. of a polynomial. See polynomial.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"degree." A Dictionary of Computing. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Oct. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"degree." A Dictionary of Computing. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 23, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/computing/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/degree

"degree." A Dictionary of Computing. . Retrieved October 23, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/computing/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/degree

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

Degree

DEGREE

Extent, measure, or scope of an action, condition, or relation. Legal extent of guilt ornegligence. Title conferred on graduates of school, college, or university. The state or civil condition of a person. The grade or distance one thing may be removed from another; i.e., the distance, or number of removes that separate two persons who are related by consanguinity. Thus, a sibling is in the second degree of kinship but a parent is in the first degree of kinship.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Degree." West's Encyclopedia of American Law. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Oct. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Degree." West's Encyclopedia of American Law. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 23, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/law/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/degree

"Degree." West's Encyclopedia of American Law. . Retrieved October 23, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/law/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/degree

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

degree

degree In mathematics, unit of angular measure equal to 1/360 of a complete revolution. One degree is written 1°, and can be divided into 60 parts called minutes (e.g. 20′), which may in turn be divided into 60 parts called seconds (e.g. 25″). Three-hundred-and-sixty degrees are equal to 2p radians. In physics and engineering, a degree is one unit on any of various scales, such as the Celsius temperature scale.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"degree." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Oct. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"degree." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 23, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/degree

"degree." World Encyclopedia. . Retrieved October 23, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/degree

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

degree

degree. A note's classification regarding its position in the scale. When a note is 3 degrees from another, the interval separating them is a 4th. The notes of the major scale are called the 1st, 2nd, etc. degrees of the scale, returning to the first degree. Alternative names for the 7 degrees are tonic, supertonic, mediant, subdominant, dominant, submediant, and leading-note.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"degree." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Music. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Oct. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"degree." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Music. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 23, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/arts/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/degree

"degree." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Music. . Retrieved October 23, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/arts/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/degree

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

degree

degree degree of freedom each of a number of independently variable factors affecting the range of states in which a system may exist, in particular any of the directions in which independent motion can occur.
prohibited degrees the number of steps of consanguinity or affinity within which marriage is not allowed.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"degree." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Oct. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"degree." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 23, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/degree

"degree." The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. . Retrieved October 23, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/degree

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

degree

degree step (now only her. in lit. sense); relative rank XIII; unit of geometrical measurement XIV; musical interval XVII; unit of temperature XVIII. — (O)F. degré :- Rom. *dēgradus, f. L. DE- 1 + gradus step, GRADE.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"degree." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Oct. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"degree." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 23, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/degree-2

"degree." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved October 23, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/degree-2

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

Degree

Degree

a rank or class of persons in society.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Degree." Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Oct. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Degree." Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 23, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/degree

"Degree." Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. . Retrieved October 23, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/education/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/degree

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

degree

degreeabsentee, addressee, adoptee, agree, allottee, amputee, appellee, appointee, appraisee, après-ski, assignee, attendee, bailee, bain-marie, Bangui, bargee, bawbee, be, Bea, bee, bootee, bouquet garni, bourgeoisie, Brie, BSc, buckshee, Capri, cc, chimpanzee, cohabitee, conferee, consignee, consultee, Cree, debauchee, decree, dedicatee, Dee, degree, deportee, dernier cri, detainee, devisee, devotee, divorcee, draftee, dree, Dundee, dungaree, eau-de-vie, emcee, employee, endorsee, en famille, ennui, enrollee, escapee, esprit, evacuee, examinee, expellee, fee, fiddle-de-dee, flea, flee, fleur-de-lis, foresee, franchisee, free, fusee (US fuzee), Gardaí, garnishee, gee, ghee, glee, goatee, grandee, Grand Prix, grantee, Guarani, guarantee, he, indictee, inductee, internee, interviewee, invitee, jamboree, Jaycee, jeu d'esprit, key, knee, Lea, lee, legatee, Leigh, lessee, Ley, licensee, loanee, lychee, manatee, Manichee, maquis, Marie, marquee, me, Midi, mortgagee, MSc, nominee, obligee, Otomi, parolee, Parsee, parti pris, patentee, Pawnee, payee, pea, pee, permittee, plc, plea, pledgee, pollee, presentee, promisee, quay, ratatouille, referee, refugee, releasee, repartee, retiree, returnee, rupee, scot-free, scree, sea, secondee, see, settee, Shanxi, Shawnee, shchi, she, shea, si, sirree, ski, spree, standee, suttee, tant pis, tea, tee, tee-hee, Tennessee, testee, the, thee, three, thuggee, Tiree, Torquay, trainee, Tralee, transferee, tree, Trincomalee, trustee, tutee, twee, Twi, undersea, vestee, vis-à-vis, wagon-lit, Waikiki, warrantee, we, wee, whee, whoopee, ye, yippee, Zuider Zee

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"degree." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Oct. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"degree." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 23, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/degree-0

"degree." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved October 23, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/degree-0

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

Degree

Degree

The word degree has several distinct meanings in science and mathematics. First, in physics, it refers to a unit of temperature. Common units of temperature are degrees Celsius (°C) and degrees Fahrenheit (°F). Absolute temperature is measured in Kelvins (not degrees Kelvin).

Second, in geometry, a degree is a unit of angle. A right angle is 90 degrees, the interior angles of a triangle always add to 180 degrees, and so on. Alternative units of angle are grads and radians.

Third, in algebra, degree refers to a property of polynomials. The degree of a polynomial in one variable (a monomial), such as 5x3, is the exponent, 3, of the variable. The degree of a monomial involving more than one variable, such as 3x2y, is the sum of the exponents; in this case, 2 + 1 = 3. The degree of a polynomial with more than one term is the highest degree among its monomial terms. Thus the degree of 5 x2y + 7 x3y2z2 + 8x4y is 3 + 2 + 2 = 7.

The degree of a polynomial equation is the highest degree among its terms. Thus the degree of the equation 5x3 3x2 = x + 1 is 3.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Degree." The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Oct. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Degree." The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 23, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/science/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/degree

"Degree." The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. . Retrieved October 23, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/science/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/degree

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

Degree

Degree

The word "degree" as used in algebra refers to a property of polynomials . The degree of a polynomial in one variable (a monomial), such as 5x3, is the exponent , 3, of the variable. The degree of a monomial involving more than one variable, such as 3x2y, is the sum of the exponents; in this case, 2 + 1 = 3. The degree of a polynomial with more than one term is the highest degree among its monomial terms. Thus the degree of 5x2y + 7x3y2z2 + 8x4y is 3 + 2 + 2 = 7.

The degree of a polynomial equation is the highest degree among its terms. Thus the degree of the equation 5x3 - 3x2 = x + 1 is 3.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Degree." The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. . Encyclopedia.com. 23 Oct. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Degree." The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. . Encyclopedia.com. (October 23, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/science/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/degree-0

"Degree." The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. . Retrieved October 23, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/science/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/degree-0

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.