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Computer Chess

COMPUTER CHESS

Video game technology has contributed to such monumental events as the Deep Blue Chess Competition. In 1997 IBM challenged then-current world chess champion Garry Kasparov to a match against the company's deep parallel supercomputer Deep Blue, to test the abilities of modern artificial intelligence. The entire match and a subsequent rematch were played online in real time.

Deep Blue won game six of the second match and defeated Kasparov before a hugely impressed global community. This pitting of man against a machine with a massive parallel search system matched a human being who makes perhaps two chess moves each second against an opponent who makes a quarter billion chess position decisions every second.

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computer chess

computer chess The development of computer game playing methods to produce high-quality chess playing programs. Most programs are based on search techniques with sophisticated enhancements (see minimax). Theoretical work on search has benefited from computer-chess experience – for example, through experiments on heuristics. Commercial and research systems of very high performance are now available.

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"computer chess." A Dictionary of Computing. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Feb. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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"computer chess." A Dictionary of Computing. . Retrieved February 20, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/computing/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/computer-chess

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