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saturation

sat·u·ra·tion / ˌsachəˈrāshən/ • n. the state or process that occurs when no more of something can be absorbed, combined with, or added. ∎  Chem. the degree or extent to which something is dissolved or absorbed compared with the maximum possible, usually expressed as a percentage. ∎  [as adj.] to a very full extent, esp. beyond the point regarded as necessary or desirable: saturation bombing. ∎  (also col·or sat·u·ra·tion) (esp. in photography) the intensity of a color, expressed as the degree to which it differs from white.

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saturation (of an organic compound)

saturation, of an organic compound, condition occurring when its molecules contain no double or triple bonds and thus cannot undergo addition reactions. For example, ethane (H3C-CH3) is a saturated compound. A compound is called unsaturated if it can undergo addition reactions. In the unsaturated compound ethene (H2C[symbol]CH2), the carbon-carbon double bond readily reacts, e.g., with hydrogen to form ethane.

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saturation

saturation In remote sensing:
1. the maximum digital number value which can be assigned to a pixel;

2. a point between the achromatic line and a pure hue of a pixel colour corresponding to the relative mixture of hues going to make up a colour.

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saturation

saturation
1. A psycho-physiological measurement of the degree to which a color appears to be free of white.

2. of a transistor. See bipolar transistor.

3. of an amplifier. A state in which the signal level exceeds the dynamic range.

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saturation (of a solution)

saturation, of a solution: see solution.

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